Monthly Archives: December 2015

“Reflections”

Bright Morning Walk on Mill Street, Stouffville

This year’s final post is a reflection on a winter past. As I noted throughout the fall, it has been a particularly mild year and we had no significant snow or cold weather till a few days ago, and even that was fairly insignificant.

Two years ago, we got hammered with an ice storm that buried us in a combination of wet snow and ice. This mixture quickly froze into solid ice and remained frozen for weeks. Power for hundreds of thousands was knocked out, mature trees toppled under the weight of the snow and ice, and our world was locked into the land of winter. Due to the extreme cold temperatures we experienced such things as ‘frost-quakes’ where the rapid cooling of ice caused the ground to boom as it contracted and the ice accumulations on the rooftops echoed with similar thuds which sounded like the roof was collapsing.

It was, a winter wonderland, and beautiful, for those who were not contending with power outages or downed trees. This image above was made looking down my street as a neighbour walks her dogs under a canopy of snow and ice.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6, @155 mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com

Advertisements

“Curl” – Point Clarke, Ontario

“November Waves” - Point Clarke, Ontario

As my fingers froze inside my gloves, I still took the time to look at the wind driven waves in awe. With 50 km/h winds pushing the waters toward the beach, long ribbons of water rolled over themselves, pulling sand from the shallow waters below them.

Such is the case here. A long wave, about a meter high, rolls in and carries strange forms within it, as the darker sand is lifted from the lakebed and mixed inside the wave as they are driven ashore.

I was trying to capture the variations inside these waves but only have a few images to share, as it was too cold to remain on the exposed beech more for more than a few minutes. If I let my imagination wander, this one remains me of some of the prehistoric cave paintings of bison, which I can almost see moving inside the wave.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @200 mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com

“Stormy December on Lake Huron” – Point Clarke

“Stormy December on Lake Huron” - Point Clarke

In stark contrast to the past few weeks, the final remaining days of December are reminding us that, despite the delay, the inevitable cycle of autumn to winter has continued.

The past weekend I had an opportunity to visit the shores of Lake Huron once more. I was there in January of this year and there is a significant difference. In January, the lakeshore was a wonderland of bizarre and outlandish shapes and structures, ranging for ice-volcanoes to vast sheets of clear blue ice strewn with soccer-ball sized spheres of ice, as far as the eye could see.

Due to our extremely mild fall, the lake remains ice-free, yet starkly cold looking. Yesterday, the winds came in from the North around 50 km/h with an air temperature around  minus three degrees Celsius. In the time it took to set up my tripod, the combination of damp wind from the lake and cold temperatures, had removed the feeling from my fingers. The wind howled and raged around me as I made a few photos of the Point Clarke lighthouse and the adjacent shoreline, before packing up and heading inland and out of the biting wind.

The photo above is one of several I made of this scene. I believe it captures the violent movement of the wind-whipped waves, the sale blue December sky and the brilliance of the pale white lighthouse nicely. It looks like I’m moving into winter photography mode now.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8, @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com

“South of Altona” – Sideline 30, Pickering

“South from Altona” - Sideline 30, Pickering

Close to the last post of the year. Another fall photograph. Why, I simply have so many good images from the fall. This photo was made looking south on Sideline 30 south of Altona, a hamlet of Pickering.

It’s hard to believe this was once a thriving community, with a hotel, several churches and a school. The hamlet lost it’s life to the “Pickering Airport project”, a topic of a previous post. Al that remains of the hamlet are a few building and a pre 20th century Mennonite meeting house. The only reason the meetin house has survived is because of the efforts of volunteers who wanted to preserve this important heritage site. Almost all the remaining building, including the school/community centre were demolished last year, to make way for an airport that will likely never be built in my lifetime. In the meanwhile,an important part of Durham region’s history has, effectively, been erased.

The hamlet of Altona will only live on in the memories of those who were once a part of its life and rhythms. I did i bit of research and could not believe the stark contrast between present day Altona and what it once was. A brief history, by Joseph Nighswander, is included here, for your further reading. What has become of this hamlet, is a sad testament to our values and the price we pay for ‘progress’.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 70mm
1/160 sec, F/6.3, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com

“Autumn Delight” – Durham Forest

“Autumn Delight”  -Durham Forest

A final (possibly) view to the autumn of 2015, though there are so many more memories to share. The image above was made on one of the many wide trails that criss-cross through the Durham Forest. I like the feel of this scene. The wide trail meanders through the forest, following the general contours of the land. There is something about a meandering trail that I like. Perhaps it’s that there is a destination, but the straight line may deprive you of some deeper experience. I enjoy ‘wandering’ through the forest and taking in all it has to offer. It’s a deliberate wandering though. I always have a destination in mind and am generally in no hurry, other than when sunset nears. As J.R.R.Tolkien said, “Not all who wander are lost.”

There certainly was no hurry on this particular day. The trails were uncrowded, at least not where I was, and it was absolutely beautiful and mild, the late day sun glowing between the branches and warming the ground. This past fall will be well remembered as one of the nicest I have experienced.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm

1/100 sec, f/5.0 -0.33, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com

“Cardinal & Red Berries” – Lynde Shores Conservation Area

Cardinal and Red Berries

Two years ago, southern Ontario, Quebec, and much of the north-eastern United States was hit hard with an exceptional ice storm. In its wake, the storm left hundreds of thousands without power and a literal wonderland of ice and sub-zero temperatures that lasted for days.

This storm was an exception in many ways. One of these was that the ice, which normally melts off shortly after the storm remained intact and stayed for many days. The wonderland I mentioned earlier was everywhere. I thick coat of beautiful, clear ice clung to everything. Large branches broke off under the weight, as well as power lines. People could not get into their cars and walking was treacherous because the ice would not break, it simply sat atop the snow and made everything into an ice rink. In fact, we witnessed people skating down our street. Not in their shoes, but wearing skates!

It was so beautiful, in fact, that it was hard to find any one thing that stood out from others. Since the ice remained for several days, it gave me time to pick my subjects for the bounty the ice offered.

The cardinal above was photographed at Lynde Shores, a local conservation area, known for it multitude of birds. The female cardinal pictured is not as bright as her male counterpart but she looked wonderful surrounded by the ice and red berries. You can get a sense of how thick the ice was by looking at the small branches. It’s a far cry from this year with fog, showers and temperatures more suited to light sweaters and running shoes than winter coats and boots.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/160 sec, f/5.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com

Merry Christmas 2015

Merry Christmas 2015

Merry Christmas, to all who follow and interact with me. It’s been a year of learning and progress. I have successfully written a book based on my photos and blog posts and I have many of you to thank for your insights and words of encouragement.

The photo above was made at a small building in Whitevale, Ontario after a very productive hike along the Seaton Trail.

May this season find you happy, healthy and filled with joy!

Ed

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 135 mm
1/2-sec, f/2.8, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com