“Common Tansy”

“Common Tansy”

“What we do see depends mainly on what we look for. … In the same field the farmer will notice the crop, the geologists the fossils, botanists the flowers, artists the colouring, sportsmen the cover for the game. Though we may all look at the same things, it does not all follow that we should see them.”
― John Lubbock

It’s strange how some of these fairly common wildflowers grow only in specific areas. Recently I was travelling north and saw immense patches of tansy and recalled that I had seen some closer to home. Travelling the local back roads, I kept looking for a patch, without success. Then, last week I saw two big patches of them, growing in complete isolation. I suppose the soil conditions were just right in only this particular spot.

I find myself noting these unique micro-environments when I’m driving. I may not always have the opportunity to stop, but I do take note, in case the opportunity to return arises. Lately, I’m seeing new and unique wildflowers with more frequency, given the drought-like conditions around here lately, even that is fading quickly, as I’m seeing plants, in leaf, wilting in the sun. Some of my go-to locations are now filled only with hearty grasses and dry stems. It seems only the deep-rooted plants are able to survive the constant heat and dryness.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/2 sec, f/16.0, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

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6 thoughts on ““Common Tansy”

  1. Midwestern Plant Girl

    I totally know what you’re saying, as I am always on the hunt for flowers for my “Blooming Flowers” posts.
    This is also why I link back to the previous years, sometimes things don’t bloom at the same time or are even found the next year.
    Seeds can lay dormant for many, many years, waiting for the right conditions to germinate and grow. I find this fascinating.
    Everything has a cycle, IMO. I haven’t seen thistles growing in my garden since a decade ago. This year is my main weed. I can site many cycles I’ve noticed, however not going to list them now. It would be a whole post!!
    Nature is such entertainment! 😃

    Reply
  2. joannesisco

    I’m going to echo scifihammy … so that’s what those yellow button flowers are called!! I’ve always called them Yellow Button flowers 😉
    I just came back from a trip up North and the sides of the road were shouting yellows and purples. I’ve never seen a summer when the open spaces were so alive with colour in the North.
    This was a very interesting post. I had no idea that plants could be dormant waiting for the right growing conditions. I assumed they were either dead or alive. Obviously I’m not a very good gardener 😉

    Reply

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