Monthly Archives: August 2016

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Trees

“Poplars on the Trail” - Secord Forest Trail

The story behind this image was posted back in December 2015.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm

1/100 sec, f/5.0 -0.33, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Red Clover”

“Red Clover”

“Every form of art is another way of seeing the world. Another perspective, another window. And science –that’s the most spectacular window of all. You can see the entire universe from there.”
― Claudia Gray

One of the benefits of this style of photography, for me at least, is noticing the intricate details in commonplace plants and flowers. This clover was growing wild along my neighbour’s lawn, which is significantly overgrown enough for wildflowers and weeds to go unmolested. As I was cutting my grass, I looked over at this ‘weed’ and wondered how it would look as a fine art photo.

Once grass cutting was completed and the light was better, I took my portable backdrop with me and proceeded to make a few images of the clover from a few angles. This one is my favourite, as it incorporates the fresh blossom as well as a slightly out of focus spent flower, almost as a reflection of itself.

Isn’t perspective an interesting thing? This overgrown lawn is an eyesore, filled with tall grass and a multitude of weeds, yet, when isolated to its individual components, it can be such a thing of beauty. Something to think about.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm (manual macro tubes)
1/15 sec, f/2.8, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Claremont Skies”

%22Claremont Skies

“Rest is not idleness, and to lie sometimes on the grass under trees on a summer’s day, listening to the murmur of the water, or watching the clouds float across the sky, is by no means a waste of time.”
― John Lubbock

After perhaps the hottest day of the summer, and the date of my oldest daughter’s engagement party, the air shifted. Forecasts had predicted severe thunderstorms and torrential downpours, which made the outdoor event pretty much a moment by moment, hope for the best on the weather front event.

Well, the next morning the air quickly changed for hot and muggy to cool and fresh. The expected thunderstorms had passed just south of us and the skies were filled with the most wonderful clouds. So wonderful, I had to make a photo to keep that memory.

As I look back on that day I could not help but notice that the sky, as a subject of its own, is often over looked. Perhaps, as we mature, we spend less time looking up and appreciating just how beautiful a cloud filled sky can be. I experienced this same feeling a few years ago as I lay on my back next to a river in northern Ontario. I just lay there, looking straight up and noticing the multitude of dragonflies darting about, at significant height. It dawned on me that it had been too long since I did nothing but just drink it in. We smile in memory of the days where we sat in a park and named the shapes we saw in the clouds, but it’s ben far too long for many of us is this constantly busy world.

Just as I spend more time appreciating the fine details of the scenes I choose to photograph, it’s time for me to enjoy the larger things, like the sky, as well.

iPhone 5s back camera 4.15mm f/2.2
1/4600 sec;   f/2.2;   ISO 32

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Blowin’ in the Wind”

“Blowin’ in the Wind”

“Voiceless it cries,
Wingless flutters,
Toothless bites,
Mouthless mutters.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien

I think I’ve photographed this tree about a dozen times. Sometimes, it’s still and brightened by a golden sunset, other times, it’s filled with birds, darting to and fro. But on this occasion, the strong winds of a hot summer day tossed it’s branches from side to side.

I took the opportunity to capture this motion through a long exposure and the results are quite pleasing. As I look at the photo, I can almost feel the ht sun on my back and feel gusts of wind blowing past me into the outstretched branches.

The slight motion blur makes the image look a bit like a painting.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Pink Cosmos”

“Pink Cosmos”

“Those who are resilient can more quickly regain their equilibrium and spring back when they are thrown off kilter by the storms of life.”
― Mary Buchan

Yes, another flower. I’m simply enjoying this too much and am looking forward to going afield on my vacation time to capture more wildflowers, as opposed to plants from my gardens. But, they are handy and I like the results.

I deliberately chose a less than perfect specimen for this image. It’s showing some wear and tear from the past few days of heavy rain and some insect damage too. But despite all that has happened to it, its still beautiful to look at. There is something about the delicate nature of cosmos that I like. They seem almost to be made of tissue paper, yet they survive the elements and keep blooming.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200mm
1/10 sec, f/8, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“North Hastings Farm Field” – Fort Stewart

“North Hastings Farm Field” - Fort Stewart, Ontario

“There are times to stay put, and what you want will come to you, and there are times to go out into the world and find such a thing for yourself.”
― Lemony Snicket

This image was made last weekend in a small town in Central Ontario called Fort Stewart. It’s a small community in the high hills of the North Hastings Highlands that if it wasn’t for the ancient stands of pine and maple and dark rivers you would think you were in West Virginia. It’s a rugged part of Ontario and one would not think productive farms could exist, yet they do. Through ingenuity and sheer determination, the early settlers were able to produce scant crops among the rocks. Enough so to warrant the building of towns with schools and churches, which remain to this day.

Through it’s unique geology, a small area or arable land formed here. Most of the farms are used as pasture land or to grow hay, but I have seen a few decent corn fields as well.

This hay field caught my attention and is directly across the road from the colt image I shared yesterday and about a mile from the deer I posted the day before that. I suppose it’s the anomaly of a hay field in this northern community that resonated with me. It seems almost out of place and would seem better suited to ore southern climes.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Coleus”

“Coleus”

“A garden should make you feel you’ve entered privileged space — a place not just set apart but reverberant — and it seems to me that, to achieve this, the gardener must put some kind of twist on the existing landscape, turn its prose into something nearer poetry.”
― Michael Pollan

I thought I would try this technique on leafy plants and expand from my blossom photos. We have several varieties of coleus in our gardens, but this one has weathered the drought better than the rest.

The wonder of coleus is that you can take a little sprig of it, place it in water for a few weeks to root and grow a whole new plant. For me, that’s great, as they winter over well and offer nice colour all summer long.

I did cheat a bit on this image. Because the plant was quite dry and flat, I misted it with water before making the photo.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/5 sec, f/11.0, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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Thursday Doors – August 18, 2016

“Art Centre Doors” - University of Toronto

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

Another of many images made during my tour of the University of Toronto campus.

The door above belongs to the University of Toronto Art Museum. I did not know that the U of T had an art museum. Shortly after making this image, I went to the Art Gallery of Ontario for an exhibit of paintings by Lawren Harris and, sure enough, one of the paintings in the exhibit was on loan for the U of T Art Museum. Isn’t it strange how, shortly after discovering something new, you come across it in your life?

This door attracted my attention primarily because if the detailed carving above it, and it’s a wonderful dark oak door with lots of interest in the glass panels. The doors stops seem to have had better days and have not been gently used.
Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/200 sec, f/7.1, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“In Fields of Gold” – Fort Stewart, Ontario

“In Fields of Gold” - Fort Stewart, Ontario

“Now and then it’s good to pause in our pursuit of happiness and just be happy.”
― Guillaume Apollinaire

We came across this little filly in a farm field near Fort Stewart. We had stopped to enjoy the grand view this little town offers and beside our stop was this little gal who wandered over to greet us.

It was amazing how much joy seeing her, petting her velvety nose, and feeding her lush clumps of grass, gave to all of us. It’s that simple happiness in unexpected places that seems so rare nowadays. The view of the Little Mississippi Valley was still there, but the focus was on this small single horse who was equally happy to receive all our attention, for a few moments.

She made a nice subject for me to photograph, surrounded by tall clumps of goldenrod that stretched into the distance.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200mm
1/100 sec, f/5.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com