Monthly Archives: September 2016

Thursday Doors – Sept 22, 2016

“St. Patrick’s Parish” - Toronto

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

 

Today, a break from my University of Toronto doors, though the photo was part of that same day’s photo shoot. After leaving the University grounds and on my way to the Art Gallery of Ontario, my wife and I stopped by a nearby pub for a bite to eat. The image above is the view we had from our seats as we ate. I could not resist these wonderful doors of St. Patrick’s Parish in downtown Toronto. Moments after I made this image, the service let out and the steps were filled with people.

Once more, the light this day was beautiful and nicely reflected from the concrete to fill all the shadows and highlight the rich colour of the doors and surrounding stonework.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Sedum”

“Sedum”

“Life is amazing, and it’s awful, and it’s ordinary, mundane and routine, but like the sun behind the clouds, amazing is always there regardless of what is momentarily obscuring it.”
― Maximus Freeman

Once more, I’m not sure of the specific species of this plant, known generally as Sedum, which we affectionately call “Lives Forever”. The name was handed down by various family members and I can understand the rationale for it. This plant is virtually ‘neglect proof’. You can drop a clump of it almost any location and it will grow. It withstands downpours and droughts with no visible sign of stress.

This particular specimen comes from my adopted mother’s garden and I acquired it many years ago when she downsized to an apartment. Numerous portions of that same small clump have been passed on to friends, neighbors, and family. It’s quite funny visiting other gardens and knowing the ‘mother’ plant is in our garden. So, though my mother has passed away, a piece of her remains in our memory and in our gardens.

We like it , particularly in the late summer and mid autumn, when it’s really the only source of colour in the garden, long after other blossoms have died off. Even when it finally succumbs to a heavy frost itself, it still offers interest as the string stems still hold the dead flower-heads erect, even in heavy snows.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200mm
10sec, f/25.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Pink Dahlias”

“Pink Dahlias”

“If the world were merely seductive, that would be easy. If it were merely challenging, that would be no problem. But I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan the day.”
― E.B. White

I simply had to revisit these beauties. I posted a similar photo earlier this week but was so pleased with the results that I went back for a second look and the outcome is the photo above. The unique way light plays on the flowers with the black background continues to mesmerize me and I honestly have to pinch myself to remind myself that the photo was something that I created. Yes, they have that effect on me.

What started as a bit of an experiment has been so enjoyable and virtually effortless for me. I’m now constantly on the lookout for new plants to photograph this way and am always amazed at the results. I find myself in that Georgia O’Keefe state where I’m drawn deeper into the flower and it temporarily becomes my world. I completely understand where she was coming from.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 62mm
1/6 sec, f/20.0, ISO 400

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Begonia Close Up”

begonia-close-up

“Let the colours of your ideas be red so that all can easily notice them! And what is red? Red is a scream, red is power, red is assertion!”
― Mehmet Murat Ildan

A bit of a journey into the world of macro photography today. I’m still getting the hang of it but enjoying the results. This red begonia blossom is part of a floral display along the main street in my town. I was walking by and noticed them, immediately wanting to capture and image. It’s a less than perfect specimen, but beautiful nonetheless.

Needless to say, I will have to go back and try again. Stay tuned 🙂

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200mm with 20mm macro extender
10 sec, f/16.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“With Love”

with-love

“I am the lover’s gift; I am the wedding wreath;
I am the memory of a moment of happiness;
I am the last gift of the living to the dead;
I am a part of joy and a part of sorrow.”
― Kahlil Gibran

In this case, a gift of love. This time of year, as the days shorten and the nights cool, I am reminded of my first date with my now wife, Betty. Many times we drive past familiar landmarks and recall our firsts and our milestones.

We’ve been through all of life’s ups and downs, raised three wonderful children, watched parents, grandparents, and loved ones pass to whatever lies beyond. We’ve had times that nearly broke us, but our love has, and continues to, sustain us through even the worst of times.

Flowers, as the quote above states so well, have been a part of many of those moments and I’m finding my recent fascination with them uplifting and wanted to share this gift, with love.

Nikon D800
Nikor 24-70mm f/3.5-4.6 @ 35mm
1/2 sec, f/20.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Dahlias”

“Dahlias"

“If you take a flower in your hand and really look at it, it’s your world for a moment.”
― Georgia O’Keeffe

I’m continuing to enjoy these studio images. Isolating the flower against the black just keeps the attention on the flower. Even when composing the shot, I see shapes and textures I had not noticed before. I’ve also done a few more macro shots, which I will share at some point. It seems the deeper and closer I go the more incredible the shapes, colours, and textures are.

I can’t recall if I’ve used the Georgia O’Keefe quote before, but it is so true to me, especially when the flower is presented this way. I find myself drawn into that world and I love it.

This grouping shows the flowers at various stages of maturity, with the exception of bud and seed head. It’s been suggested I start using these images for gifts cards, which is what I already do with many of my images.

Nikon D800
Nikor 24-70mm f/3.5-4.6 @ 62mm
1/6 sec, f/20.0, ISO 400

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Late Summer Asters”

“Late Summer Asters”

“One realized all sorts of things. The value of an illusion, for instance, and that the shadow can be more important than the substance. All sorts of things.”
― Jean Rhys

This is the second image I have made of an aster using the black background technique and is a bit darker and moodier than the previous image but I did not want to wash out the intense purple of the petals by increasing the exposure.

A notable effect of it being late summer is that the aster has sustained fairly significant insect damage to its leaves. Yet, the extreme heat we’ve had the past few weeks does not seem to have browned and wilted it like so many of its companion plants.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200mm with 20mm macro extender
1/6 sec, f/18.0, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Home”

“Home”

“It is very important that we have the capacity to love many different things or people at the same time. Our love should radiate like the sun, warming everything it touches.”
― Peggy Toney Horton

The sun is less intense, nights are cool, and mornings full of mist and promise. The fields are filled with late summer wildflowers: goldenrod, purple asters, fleabane, and the shells of mid-summer blossoms, now gone to seed. And, the butterflies, oh, the butterflies abound. Yellow sulphurs and cabbage butterflies dart around nervously, and the monarchs perch upon their milkweed.

As is evident with this singular monarch butterfly, they certainly have an affinity for milkweed, it’s where they chose to lay their eggs and seems to be their nectar of choice, till the blossoms fade and seed-pods form, then they seem to favour goldenrod, at least in this area, and the goldenrod is plentiful and healthy this time of year.

Despite all the bright colours competing with her, this monarch still stands out as she perches atop her pedestal, her home, surveying the world around her. It was interesting that she remained still and let me approach, quite closely, without alarming her. She just sat there, basking in the sun and fanning her wings; drinking in the final warmth of the day.

I took  multiple shots as she fanned her wings, trying to capture that exact moment when the late afternoon sun illuminated her wings from behind. All the elements came together, provided the effect I wanted to convey, and made the image look almost three dimensional.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/200 sec, f/7.1, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Thursday Doors – September 15, 2016

%22low-overhead%22-trinity-college-toronto

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

Yet another return to the University of Toronto and its doors. Today, I have chosen a peculiar doorway to Trinity College. Though it’s difficult to show the scale on the photo, the doorway is quite short, only about five feet tall. I’m not sure what the significance is, perhaps it forces you to bow on entering?

This portion of the building is a more recent addition, as indicated by the cornerstone, though it still had the same wonderful architecture as the main building it was added to.

Once again, this day offered me superb natural light which shone from the stones, illumination the wonderful oak doors.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Icheumon” – Scorpion Wasp

“Ichneumon”

“You notice, by the way, that we never have a meeting with an alien. It’s always an encounter.”
― Jack McDevitt

Also known as a Scorpion Wasp due to their appearance, or more correctly, American Pelecinid Wasp. These alien looking creatures look like they may have come from a child’s nightmare, but the long tail, which resembles a scorpion’s stinger as actually used by the wasp to deposit its egg on grubs underground.

So, from a human standpoint it’s no real threat. But to a grub, it’s a horror story. You see, the long stinger allows the wasp to deposit eggs on grubs while they are still underground, by poking through the dirt and inserting the eggs onto the living grub. As the single egg hatches, the wasp’s own grub begins to eat the host from inside.

The wasp itself is a nectar feeder, usually flying low and can often be seen on bushes and low growing plants. It’s primary benefit is the control of beetle populations by using their grubs as hosts.

iPhone 5s back camera 4.15mm f/2.2
1/30 sec;   f/2.2;   ISO 50

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com