Monthly Archives: January 2017

Tuesdays of Texture – January 31, 2017

“Enrobed in Ice”

“Real Canada is where people wear sweaters for survival, not style.”
― Mark Leiren-Young

Ice, ice, and more ice. The surreal effects of freezing rain on delicate branches. Beautiful, yet treacherous in even mall doses, making a single misstep dangerous, we soon miss the effects of friction in our world.

The curious thing I’ve found when faced with this spectacle is that when everything is beautiful, it becomes difficult to separate single compositions as the whole scene competes for my attention.

Nikon D300
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 145mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Advertisements

Monochrome Mondays – “Peruvian Lilies in Mono”

“Peruvian Lilies in Mono”

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/29.0, ISO 100

Hi Resolution image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Underside”

“Underside”

“Thus the man who is responsive to artistic stimuli reacts to the reality of dreams as does the philosopher to the reality of existence; he observes closely, and he enjoys his observation: for it is out of these images that he interprets life, out of these processes that he trains himself for life.”
― Friedrich Nietzsche

On these cool, blustery winter days, it’s a nice to be able to head to the studio and play with some macro photography. Under the studio lights, fine details, often missed start to reveal themselves. I find myself pulled deeper and deeper into the image, almost shocked at structures my eye did not consciously see. I chose the word ‘consciously’ deliberately, because I know that our eyes are capturing all this visual data, but our brain filters it, selectively.

The fern is a good example. Not that I sat staring wild eyed at ferns, because I had not noticed the spores (the round cones under the leave for the non-botany folks) on the underside until researching  local fern varieties.

Now I sit in awe at the exquisite textures and details of this fern frond, frozen in time for me to observe more carefully.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/29.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“York River Reflections”

“York River Reflections”

“Abstraction allows man to see with his mind what he cannot see physically with his eyes….Abstract art enables the artist to perceive beyond the tangible, to extract the infinite out of the finite. It is the emancipation of the mind. It is an exploration into unknown areas.”
― Arshile Gorky

This is where is started, my fascination with photo abstractions. Back in March 0f 2012, I was hiking the shores of the York River, near Bancroft, Ontario when I noticed a beautiful reflection on the slightly rippled river surface. I made a few images and was pleased with the outcome. Then, I did something different: I cropped hem to remove the shoreline and flipped the image upside down, producing this beautiful ‘painterly’ abstract of the trees on the far shore. The slight flash of orange near the centre of the photo was an interesting and unexpected bonus.

A close friend of mine commented that it looked like a painting and I ran with that, making my first 24 x 36 canvas print, and yes, it did look like a painting then. It sold quickly and I’m considering reprinting it, larger, for my office wall, since it really has been a pivotal piece for me.

I’m thinking this may serve as the model for my next attempt at painting. Stay tuned.

Nikon D200
Tamron 17-50 mm f/2.8 @ 50mm
1/100 sec, f/4.5, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“It’s Been a While”

“If you see a tree as blue, then make it blue”.
– Paul Gauguin

I posted this image to my Facebook page last week. It’s my first attempt at painting, of the non-digital type, in thirty five or so years. The last time I picked up a paintbrush to create art was back in high school and honestly, I was not very good at acrylics, favouring sketching and watercolours. Primarily because I could not get the colours right. I over processed and turned everything gray or brown. Of course, it was art class too, so it had to meet certain parameters. Creativity my my art class was not encouraged. Wow, that sounds odd, doesn’t it? And that, was the end of that. I much prefered to express myself through photography, which I was more comfortable with.

I recent posts, I have taken images that I composed with the camera that did not result in the image as I envisioned it. Some of those, I processed through digital art programs and was very pleased with the outcomes.

Last week, I went to an Impressionist exhibit in Toronto, called “Mystical Landscapes”, presented by the Art Gallery of Ontario. I’m drawn by the impressionist form and style myself a bit of a photo-impressionist, focussing on the feel of a place, rather than precision. I’ll often visit the same place over and over in different times and light, much like Monet did. I see different colours, like the Gauguin quote. I’ve seen lots of blue trees, in early evening light. You’ll notice, many of my trees in this painting are blue.

I’ve had this quote in my head for a few months now and it challenged me:

If you hear a voice within you say, ‘you can’t paint,’ then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced.
— Vincent Van Gogh

So, I finally felt inspired to pick up a brush to see what happens, silence that voice. If it was a total disaster, I could just toss it and go back to photography, if it was half-good, I might pursue it.

Well, the result shocked me, as I stepped away and looked back at the painting on the easel I got quite emotional. I’d found something within myself that I did not know existed. This was something created out of nothing, just an image I had made, transformed into something new. I shared it with some friends who responded back positively, most asking me why I had not painted before this and encouraging me to continue with this, which I will do. My biggest surprise was that this 11 x 14 acrylic painting was done in about 2 hours, so I think I will continue, maybe take a lesson or two, since I’m relearning brush strokes for my youth.

Life sure is an interesting journey 🙂

“Golden Memories”

“Golden Memories”

I’ve had a few people ask recently how I’m able to pick up the golden glow in some of my forest images. One of my recent images, “November’s Golden Litter” – Hermon, Ontario, is an example of their fabulous effect on a large scale. When conditions are just right: the right light, the angel of that light, the condition and colour of the leaves, and a contrasting background, the effect is almost magical. If you have stood on a forest trail and experienced this, you will know what I mean. It is tough to describe.

Many times I’ve seen this phenomenon and tried to capture it as a photo, only to be disappointed in the results, the surreal glow muted down to a dull orange or yellow. Over the years, and many failures, I’ve found ways of capturing the moment fairly consistently.

During one of those moments I picked up a few unsullied oak leaves to photograph in my little studio. Well, today was the day, and the result is shown above. Once again, with the right light and the right angle, I was able to reproduce this golden effect successfully in a single leaf. Now, imagine thousands of these littering the forest floor, interspersed with other yellow and bronze leaves like maple and beech, and you will understand where this stunning golden light comes from. I’m so very pleased this little experiment turned out so well.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/29.0, ISO 100

Hi Resolution image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Big Bite” – Chickadee with Seed

“Big Bite” - Chickadee with Seed

“There is no mundane dimension really, if you have the eyes to see it, it is all transcendental.”
― Terence McKenna

The view from my back window yesterday afternoon, as the birds returned for a feed. I posted several images of other local birds in late December and the simple chickadees, who are frequent visitors, were omitted. I began questioning myself on that. Why was I ‘editing’ what I shared? Is the humble chickadee less worthy than the bright cardinal or more elusive nuthatch? Will the photo not impress and get more likes. Have I gotten to that point? I certainly hope not. I’ve always enjoyed seeing beauty in the mundane and sharing those moments; I don’t ever want to lose that gift, especially in these superficial times.

So, as I considered the  image again, and looked at all the wonderful details in this ‘common’ bird, I found myself seeing it anew. The soft pastel orange of the belly feathers, the fine details in the delicate wings, and incredible details in and around the eyes, often missed because they move around so quickly.

The other thing that struck me, and inspired the title of the photo was the size of the seeds that the chickadee choose. He’d land, pick one, and then fly away with it, as another bird took his place. Never once did more than one bird occupy the dish. They waited, swooped in, took a seed, and departed, for the better part of the afternoon. Then, the cycle stopped and none returned, even though there was still food in the dish.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 300mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com