Monthly Archives: January 2017

Thursday Doors – January 26, 2017

West Doors - St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Toronto

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

West Doors of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Toronto, Canada

Another view of this downtown Toronto church. I posted a photo of the front doors last week. A habit I have been in for some time now is to walk around the structure. WHile the front doors are grand and beautiful, many historical buildings have very interesting side and back doors. They tend to be a bit more ‘distressed’ than their welcoming counterparts, but this also makes them very interesting.

I do find it interesting though, that alternate doors (sorry, unintentional humour here), are not very well maintained. Less maintained may be the more correct expression here, as they are not, generally, in total disrepair. This west facing door is of the exact same design as the front doors, yet stonework is cracked and the door quite faded. I’m sure much is driven by budget decisions but, for me, it says a lot about priorities. I’m sure at one point, all the doors were equally important. After all, a lot of work went into the stunning stonework which frames the door itself. It just seems less important now. Just an impression.

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“Chess Set”

chess-set-white

“Chess Set - Black”

“Sharing tales of those we’ve lost is how we keep from really losing them.”
― Mitch Albom

One of the treasures my father left me is this beautiful chess set. As a child I used to look at them closely, admiring the fine details of this cast iron, the white players nickel plated and the black being copper plated, chess set.

I have no idea where he got them, only that he brought the set with him from Germany when he immigrated. In my imagination, they came from some old castle or a grand house where nobles used to play with them. An unlikely source, but part of the childhood memory.

Given the marvelous details, I thought they might make a nice subject to document with a photo. It’s also a chance to play with macros settings and lighting some more.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro @90mm
1.0 sec, f/29.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

 

Tuesdays of Texture – January 24, 2017

“Icy Shell”

“Ice contains no future , just the past, sealed away. As if they’re alive, everything in the world is sealed up inside, clear and distinct. Ice can preserve all kinds of things that way- cleanly, clearly. That’s the essence of ice, the role it plays.”
― Haruki Murakami

The image I chose for today was made a few days ago, as I hiked through a local conservation area. I came across a log which was coated with a thick layer of ice. The temperature was just above freezing, which caused a thin film of water to form on the ice. What really interested me was looking at the ice itself and being able to see the individual ice crystals, each a miniature lens to view the wood beneath the ice.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/50 sec, f/3.5, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Coral Geranium”

“Coral Geranium”

“Everyday gratitude sweetens what appears flavorless and brightens all that appears dim.”
― Amy Leigh Mercree

The floral photography adventure continues. As I keep making these images, I’m trying a few different techniques. In this instance, the blossoms were at the end of a long stalk. Including the stalk lengthwise made the photo, and the plant itself look awkward. So, I spun the plant around and photographed it end-on.

A further challenge with this angle was trying to show the entire flower in focus and bright while allowing the light to gradually fall off, so that the blossom appears to be coming from the darkness. The challenge here is that the blossoms are very bright and the leaves quite dark. I’m also getting used to a newly acquired macro lense, which gives me far more aperture flexibility than my previous extension tube setup.

To get the entire blossom in focus, as well as most of the leaves required a very narrow aperture of f/29, but since I had abundant light, I was able to keep the shutter speed a bit faster at 1/4 sec. Still learning, but enjoying the journey.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
0.4 sec, f/29.0, ISO 200

Hi Resolution image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Diaphanous”

“Diaphanous”

“Time leaches the colors from the best of visions. The world becomes grayer. Entropy beats us down. Everything fades. Everything goes. Everything dies.”
― Robert Silverberg

Back outdoors again, in the midst of a January thaw, too much of a thaw, actually. As I set out on the trails, expecting ice, which I was prepared for, I was faced with deep, slushy, wet snow, tough to walk in and impossible to grip, even with my ice cleats. It made for a fairly exhausting hike, but I was determined to complete my usual five kilometer loop today and make some photos along the way, if they offered themselves.

The day started out moody, dull, and foggy, which inspired me to get out to photograph for of this atmosphere, but by the time I drove to my destination, the fog had dissipated, so I proceeded to hike.

Mild temperatures and showers over the past few days had knocked many of the last remaining leaves to the ground and they rested on the grainy, wet snow. An interesting effect of the moisture and changing temperatures was that many of them seemed very ‘thin’, diaphanous, as they littered the snowy forest floor, slowly decaying. The snow itself was not a pure white either, rather, spotted with particles of dirt and dust which had accumulated so far this winter. I would have prefered a pure white background, but the spots enhance the image a bit by showing through the leaf.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com