Monthly Archives: June 2017

“Air Traffic”

"Air Traffic"

“He imagines a necessary joy in things that must fly to eat.”
― Wendell Berry

A final look at this fleabane plant and accompanying wildlife. The Crescent butterfly, now satisfied, flies off to its next destination, while a small bee arrives to repeat the cycle.

I like the movement in this image. It nicely illustrates the activity that goes on, even around a single plant, all day long. Each visitor, in its turn, partaking of what the plant has to offer; in return, the plant sends its pollen along to neighbouring plants, a hitchhiker tagging along with the hungry visitors, anther cycle. It’s quite a thing to watch, and much of it is missed, since the smaller flies and bees are so small and fast, that they are merely blurs to the naked eye, frozen here, to enjoy and wonder at.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/500sec, f/7.1 ISO 400

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“Crescent Posing on Fleabane”

“Crescent Posing on Fleabane”

“Silence

It has a sound, a fullness.
It’s heavy with sigh of tree,
and space between breaths.
It’s ripe with pause between birdsong
and crash of surf.
It’s golden they say.
But no one tells us it’s addictive.”
― Angela Long

I’m revisiting a Crescent which posed on a clump of Fleabane. My previous post had the butterfly drinking nectar from the flower, with an accompanying bee. In this image, the butterfly simply sits, its wings spread wide, warming in the sunshine. The image also serves to illustrate that even slight changes in a composition can change the whole feel of the image.

While the prior post was filled with activity, this one is quite serene and just pretty to look at. It brings a sense of calm with the pink flowers and the soft green background. Plus, there seems to be something about butterflies at rest that invokes that same restfulness in the observer.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/500sec, f/7.1 ISO 400

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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Thursday Doors | June 29, 2017

“Zaragoza 20 - San Jose del Cabo”

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Zaragoza 20 – San Jose del Cabo”

These weather worn doors are the entrance to La Panga Antigua, a restaurant in the Art District of San Jose del Cabo in Baja California, Mexico. See here for what lies behind these ‘rustic’ doors. You’ll be surprised. I was and now will have to return to sample the interior. I’m also including a Streetview link so you have some context of the neighbourhood.

When I made the image I was simply intrigued by the chunk of wood suspended above the door. It just seemed odd and out of place. Now, as I look up the address and the name of the establishment, it all makes sense, sort of. A Panga, modern derivation traditional dugout fishing boat. Generally, if you say panga, it’s simply interpreted as ‘boat’.

Now it makes sense, La Panga Antigua means “the old boat” and the chunk of wood is actually a piece of an old wooden dugout. Anyways, that mystery is now solved and I can reflect back on the numerous interesting and unique doors in this area of San Jose del Cabo, the Art District. Each vendor trying to differentiate themselves from others, often through the use of doors.

Nikon D800
AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G IF- @ 112mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6 ISO 200

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Field Bindweed – Convolvulus arvenis”

“Field Bindweed - Convolvulus arvenis”

“The miracle is that the brilliance of the miraculous can live in the blandness of the mundane. The greater miracle is that we have enough brilliance in our own blandness to see it.”
― Craig D. Lounsbrough

I’m finding even common items fascinating lately, as I get ‘close’ to them. The image above is of a common wildflower, or to gardeners, an invasive and prolific weed. I’ve seen entire lawns infested with this plant, yet along a hiking trail, it’s lovely. When composing this image, I realized that it reminded my one of those hugh Georgia O’Keeffe paintings and I think it would translate nicely from photo to painting, something I may do when the snow flies once more. But, for now, I think I’ll set the brushes aside and take in all that nature has to offer my lens and me.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/500 sec, f/7.1 ISO 400

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Orange Skipper on Dogwood Leaf”

“Orange Skipper on Dogwood”

“You lift your head, you’re on your way, but really just to be walking, to be out of doors. That’s it, that’s all, and you’re there. Outdoors is our element: the exact sensation of living there.”
― Frédéric Gros

By far the most common of local meadow butterflies are skippers. Once you spot one, you suddenly see dozens. The name skipper is so appropriate too, as they move quickly from flower to flower. They do sit still long enough to snap a photo or two, then they are on the move again.

Like I said, once you see one it seems the meadow is filled with them. If I stand and carefully observe, there are time where a single plant may have two or three on it at any given time. I’m not sure of the precise species and have not done an exhaustive study of them. They have become a fallback when the dragonflies are too active.

As in previous shots, this is my first foray into outdoor macro photography of insects and I have to say it’s a lot of fun, yet has its own challenges. When I photograph butterflies with my 70-300 zoom, I don’t have to be overly close and depth of field is not such an issue. With the macro, I have to move close and hopefully, not disturb by subject. I’m sure other insect photographers are smiling at this point. It’s not as easy as it seems, but I’m learning and loving every minute of it, especially when processing the images and noticing all the fine details.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/400 sec, f/11 ISO 400

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Sweet Pea Blossoms”

“Sweet Pea Blossoms”

“Like all sweet dreams, it will be brief, but brevity makes sweetness, doesn’t it?”
― Stephen King

Much of the conservation land surrounding my home, including parks and hiking trails, was, at some not too distant time, farmland. It’s difficult to visualize, as I walk through now forested areas. Every now and then though, evidence of former use makes itself known.

On one particular site, many perennial sweet peas can be found at the perimeter of meadows, especially now that they are beginning to bloom. They are quite lovely and I thought worth sharing.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/320 sec, f/7.1 ISO 400

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Perching Blue”

“Perching Blue”

“There are 365 days in a year and you will meet all the colours of life throughout the year: The blue, the black, the pink… Only blue is not a life, only pink is not a life, only black is not a life! Life is all the colours!”
― Mehmet Murat ildan

The outdoors is filled with unexpected gifts. As I set out to photograph the Lady Slipper Orchids last Saturday, that was my only goal. I had no intention of stopping on the way in, nor on my way out of the forest where they grow. I suppose such is the nature of a fixed agenda, no room for anything else.

As those who follow this blog on a regular basis will have noticed, there has been a recent shift from flowers to insects. Fear not, I will continue with flowers as well, but there have been great opportunities presented to photograph some of the local wildlife, primarily insects as well. I photograph because I enjoy being able to share my experiences and learn new things along the way.

One of those learning opportunities occurred when I photographed this “Blue”, or more precisely, a Spring Azure butterfly. These tiny, quick moving, and skittish butterflies are often sitting on the trail, but seldom stick around long enough to photograph. This one was considerate enough to pose on a blade of grass, long enough to get this image, as well as a side shot, which helped me identify it when I got home.

The learning piece of the story comes from having a clear macro image of the butterfly, revealing the fine blue hairs on it’s torso and being able to see the tiny, blue, iridescent scales on its wings, which give it that slightly metallic look. If I had to do it again, I would have narrowed the aperture a bit more, but I was also fighting a breeze that day, which limited me to a higher shutter speed and I did not want to bump the ISO much more.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/500 sec, f/11.0 ISO 400

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com