Monthly Archives: July 2017

“Japanese Beetle on Queen Anne’s Lace”

“Japanese Beetle on Queen Anne’s Lace”

“Nature will bear the closest inspection. She invites us to lay our eye level with her smallest leaf, and take an insect view of its plain. “
– Henry David Thoreau

There is no shortage of insect life on the Queen Anne’s Lace this summer. It seems to be especially popular to various bugs and beetles. Here, a Japanese Beetle tours the outer flowerettes, I’m assuming looking for a meal of nectar.

I found it interesting, while editing the image, that the reflection of my red tee-shirt shows up on the beetle’s metallic shell. I’ve got to be more careful in the future.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/640 sec, f/10.0 ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Top of Jarvis”

“Top of Jarvis”

“Art is not a handicraft, it is the transmission of feeling the artist has experienced.”
– Leo Tolstoy

This is a very non-typical photo for me, but I do have a habit of making images of things that I find interesting or unusual.

Yesterday, I spend a few hours touring the area of Bloor Street and Church Street in Toronto. It’s an area which I drive through frequently when visiting my daughter, who lives in the area. During these drives, I have noticed some interesting architecture and have made note of them for a future walking visit. That opportunity presented itself and I went to see some of these features close up.

One of the features that I’ve been intrigued with is this art installation at the very top of Jarvis street. It’s a series of tall red tubbes, which stand about ten to fifteen meters tall. There is a complimentary installation just south of it, consisting of thinner blue tubes on an angel. I prefer these red tubes, which appear to be reaching up the side of the building like some subterranean monster.

Like I said, this type of photography is not my  forte, but I was please at how the resulting photo portrayed the scene I witnessed.

For those interested, here’s a Google Streetview image of the location.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/670 sec; f/1.8; ISO 20

 

 

 

 

“The Reach”

“The Reach”“Stretching his hand up to reach the stars, too often man forgets the flowers at his feet.”
– Jeremy Bentham

A quick shot today of a honey bee stretching for the nectar of a milkweed blossom.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/160 sec, f/16.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Hoverfly on Timothy Grass Blossom”

“Hoverfly on Timothy Grass Blossom”

The more often we see the things around us – even the beautiful and wonderful things – the more they become invisible to us. That is why we often take for granted the beauty of this world: the flowers, the trees, the birds, the clouds – even those we love. Because we see things so often, we see them less and less.
– Joseph B. Wirthlin

The quote above really resonates with me. I have often commented about how my brain has learned to ‘filter’ out so much of what I see. Just how clever our brains can be came to light in a very real way a few months ago when I underwent a surgical procedure on both my eyes called an iridotomy. Essentially, a laser is used to drill small drain holes in my irises to prevent pressure build up behind the lense, which is a hereditary trait in my family, and a real issue for me as a photographer.

After the surgery, these small holes allowed additional light into my eyes and caused bright lights to create a secondary ‘ghost’ image. This ‘ghosting ‘ lasted about four week and my brain gradually filtered it out. Now, I can’t see the ‘ghost’ even when I try. The brain is that powerful.

So, I am making it a point to re-see the world around me and try to remove some of those filters. Photography is a huge enabler to the process.

If you look closely, you’ll see the tiny purple blossoms, which are clearly attracting yet another hoverfly. A whole new world is opening to me this summer, as I make images of the flora and fauna in the small meadow at the end of my street.

I’m discovering a complex network of life in this mundane place, which is mundane no more. Even on a quiet morning, the place is alive with activity and colour, you have bt to look for it and once you see it, there is no going back.

It does look odd to the outside observer, as I focus my camera on a stem of grass, but that observer would have no idea of the wonder I am seeing. So be it. Too often I hear photographers saying they live in an area that is boring, that there is nothing worth photographing. Well, this small meadow is an example of just how untrue statements like that are. They have stopped seeing. I am learning to re-see, with the same fascination I had as a child and it feels great.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/100 sec, f/16.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“A Touch of Pink”

“A Touch of Pink”

A soul mate’s purpose is to shake you up, tear apart your ego a little bit, show you your obstacles and addictions, break your heart open so new light can get in, make you so desperate and out of control that you have to transform your life, then introduce you to your spiritual master…” 
― Elizabeth Gilbert

I gazed at this Queen Anne’s Lace flower in amazement. I had never noticed the pink frill. As I observed other, it became apparent that this was unique to one small patch, all the others were plain white.

What made this one particularly special was the slight heart shape, or am I imagining this?

The shape caused me to drift into the realm of emotion and life. My wife simply loves Queen Anne’s Lace and has made several lovely photos of the blossoms. That makes my photography expeditions so much nicer; having someone who also appreciates nature and photography, and is so incredibly supportive and encouraging of my journey into this art. This, of course, means infinite patience on drives, as I pull over to capture some roadside image, though she may not see it as I do. It means helping me overcome my self-doubt about my abilities, as she challenges me to be better than I believe I can be. As in the quote above from Eat, Pray, Love, she pushes me to be more, and for this, I am eternally grateful.

I truly believe that if it were not for her I would still be taking snapshots, suitable only for the family album, and nothing more. Instead, she has opened me up to sense the life and energy around me, by being a part of it. Thus enabling me to focus on the essence of what I am photographing.

Which brings me back to the image of the Queen Anne’s Lace blossoms, with its unusual pink frills, encircling an incredibly complex cluster of sub-blossoms. Each of the ‘pinks’ are small flower clusters as are the component bundles they surround.

Be sure you have a close look at this lovely blossom, go deep, and enjoy this moment captured on a recent summer morning. From the heart.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/320 sec, f/16.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

 

“Box Elder Beetle on Canada Thistle”

“Box Elder Beetle on Canada Thistle”

“Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul. “
– John Muir

Simple beauty will suffice for me. In this case, a brightly coloured Box Elder beetle, one of many insects partaking in the bounty of nectar within this patch of Canada thistles I’m spending a lot of time with.

Soon, they will fade and go to seed and other plants will dominate, but for now, I’m finding beauty aplenty right here.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Thursday Doors | July 27, 2017

“SV Blackjack” - Cabin Door

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“SV Blackjack” – Cabin Door

This image is quite a departure from my regular ‘doors’ images. A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to see a Tall Ship Regatta stop in the small port town of Bath, Ontario. Bath, is a small village on the south shores of Lake Ontario and made an ideal spot for these magnificent vessels to harbour for the night.

I have a very real love for sailing ships. I love the sound of rigging creaking, the snap of the sails as they fill with wind, and water sloshing against the hull. I’m a bit of romantic, picturing these ships plying the lakes and seas in bygone days. Most of the older vessels still have a lot of brass and wood on their trim and fittings, including this cabin door, though not ideally lit, it was an opportunity for me to add another door to my collection.

Though I posted images of other ships earlier this month, I’m including an image of this particular ship for your enjoyment.

Black Jack

 

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 200 mm
1/320sec, f/9.0 ISO 200

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com