Monthly Archives: October 2017

Happy Halloween 

“A Many Splendoured Thing”

“Living with love for all humankind and worshiping nature’s immense beauty cures heartache and restores bliss. Respecting the splendor of nature awakens us to the beauty inscribing our own humanity.” 
― Kilroy J. Oldster

Every now and then, a quote just ‘fits’ the photo so well. The ‘aliveness’ experienced at moments like this, standing on a trail and bearing witness to such simple marvels is a spiritual experience. Even looking back on the image, during a busy, stress filled workday, calms me, knowing just how temporary it all is.

To think that this ‘moment’ is merely a single stopping place along the way further enriches me.

I’m really enjoying the creation of this “Golden Paths” series, as I’m deliberately progressing along the trail and through time. Reflecting back on these places is therapeutic for me. Recalling the feelings on being on the trails, in this case, with my wife and oldest daughter, especially as I write at the end of long workdays. The act of reviewing the photos, recalling the moment, and writing about it offers a wonderful respite from the day’s stresses. I hope the effect is contagious.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/20.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Standing Tall”

“But give thanks, at least, that you still have Frost’s poems; and when you feel the need of solitude, retreat to the companionship of moon, water, hills and trees. Retreat, he reminds us, should not be confused with escape. And take these poems along for good luck!” 
― Robert Graves

Atop a shallow slop, a tight cluster of trees rises straight and tall, a competition for sunlight and the nourishment it brings. Some less hearty members, namely the birches, lie extinguished on the forest floor, a testament to the nature of nature.

Among the fallen birches, delicate saplings and ferns rise up, surviving on the sparse light that seeps through the tight canopy high above. The forest floor, as noted in earlier posts is sparse, something I believe to be the result of the warm yet wet summer, which provided a thick and lush canopy but deprived the low ground plants of much-needed light. I’m hoping this is just part of a natural cycle which I have not witnessed till now.

As in previous posts, the bright gold of the maple trees dominates the background, broken up by patches of green. Yet, the green fades day by day, hour by hour, and all will soon be yellow and gold.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/10.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Hillside Shift”

“Hillside Shift”

“That quotation about not having time to stand and stare has never applied to me. I seem to have spent a good part of my life – probably too much – in just standing and staring and I was at it again this morning.” 
― James Herriot

I thoroughly enjoyed just standing and staring at this scene. I liked the transition or ‘shift’ from deep green ferns at my feet to the bright golds at the top of the hill. There’s also a shift from shadows to light and a delicate glow produced in the foreground from the bright light behind.

As the “Golden Paths” series continues, you will notice a shift from green to yellow, to orange. Some of this is due to the gradual change in the leaf colours and some due to the composition of the forest itself, as I hike from the immature maple saplings, through larger beech, and into rolling hills, dominated by mature oak and maple. That transition, within a relatively small area fascinates me. I pass through tight clusters of slender saplings and into hills lined with large, mature hardwoods.

It’s this forest diversity that is so appealing to me. I find myself going to these areas rather than those dominated by a particular species. It’s colourful, but monotonous, if that makes sense at all? I like the variety offered to me by specific trails. After all, if I’m going to stand in on place and stare, I want a good reason to do so.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/10.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“All That Glitters…”

“All That Glitters...”

“All that glisters is not gold—
Often have you heard that told.”
– William Shakespeare

Indeed, all that glitters is not gold, but often beautiful, nonetheless. These young poplars along the edge of a meadow actually glimmered as the gentle breeze shifted through the golden leaves, making them shimmer in the sunlight.

This image is still a part of my “Golden Paths” series. It’s the only one that was made, thus far, outside of the forest, though still a stop on the path, as it emerged from the forest. The bright wood of the tall tree trunks are what drew my attention at first, but it was the movement and brightness of the leaves that caused me to make the image, hoping to capture this moment effectively.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/18.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Our Winding Ways”

“Our Winding Ways”

“The best part of the journey is the surprise and wonder along the way.” 
― Ken Poirot

The quote I chose for this image is quite simple, yet has such depth to me. As I hike and make images, I am constantly surprised at what lies before me. My path is seldom straight, and I can’t always see what’s ahead, though I journey in anticipation. Every bend yields something new and often unexpected. The light plays in different ways, making familiar scenes change before our eyes. The forest, is always shifting, changing, adapting.

At some point, someone created this path. It may have started as a game trail or been deliberately carved through the forest. It often makes sense, winding around objects or following the contours of the land. Straight paths speed the journey, but often take us far from the many beautiful places the forest has to offer. Personally, I prefer the winding path. A path where I can take my time and enjoy as much of my surroundings as possible.

As this path winds its way through the forest, the canopy takes on more or the golden hues that inspired this series of images, the “Golden Paths” series. Some of the paths in this series are straight, some curved, and some, barely discernible, but all are the ways I have travelled and each holds its own experience for me. Something I’m trying to communicate with this series.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/10.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Like a Distant Fire”

“Like a Distant Fire”

“Art doesn’t give rise to anything in us that isn’t already there. It simply stirs our curious consciousness and sparks a fire that illuminates who we have always wanted to be.” 
― Kamand Kojouri

Deeper into the woods the path winds, the canopy ablaze with brightness and surreal colour. Ahead, a wall of shimmering orange and yellow, like ethereal flames, dances in the breeze, amidst dark tree trunks, filling my eyes with the magic of autumn light.

It’s this light that inspired the “Golden Paths” series and my desire to capture some of this wonderful experience in words and images. Words fall short, but the images approximate feelings. Every turn of the path fills my soul with delight. After a dull, rainy summer, the extended and mild autumn more than makes up for it. I expect every day on the trails to be a final opportunity, but it keeps giving, though I’m restricted to weekend walks. I find the leaves turning gradually, a transition from summer greens to autumn yellow and orange. Red makes an appearance in subtle ways, never quite overpowering. A handful of leaves are scattered on the ground, the rest, still hanging on, despite rain and wind. It’s difficult to believe that November is only a week away.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/11.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com