“Blue Birches”

Blue Birches

“The world is full of magic things, patiently waiting for our senses to grow sharper.” 
― W.B. Yeats

I wanted to post one more of my ‘artsy’ interpretations. This time, the predominant color is blue, very appropriate for this late March day. The image was made around noon yesterday and I applied a filter to enhance the tones and textures. I had no idea just how much blue was preset in this scene. And then, looking back, it is true. My brain just knows that snow and birches are white, right? Yes, but it filters out all information on the reflected light it is seen in.

Part of this exercise is my desire to interpret the image as more than a simple photo, to add a feel through colour and texture. SInce I’m not a great painter, I let the computer help me in this aspect, till my painting improves. One day, I hope to be able to create this image from scratch, but that will take much practice and patience.

What strikes me, as I noted in yesterday’s post, is just how much our brain filters our vision to match our perception. This has broader implications than a brief post would cover, but it plants the seeds for us to consider our perceptions and the strong effect they have on our interaction with the world we live in.

Something to consider…

Apple iPhone 7
iPhone 7 back camera 3.99mm f/1.8
1/900 sec, f/1.8, ISO 20

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5 thoughts on ““Blue Birches”

  1. lynnwiles

    Interesting. I always reduce the saturation of the blue and sometimes purple to make the images match my vision of what the scene looked like to me.

    Reply
  2. Amy

    It’s interesting how the colors were interpreted. I do like the blues in this scene, but I’m sure that I wouldn’t have noticed those tones while standing there. 🙂

    Reply
  3. jillslawit

    Different and interesting. It really is just like artwork, and makes you view things on another level. I don’t understand technology much, but this is cool how computers can interpret things.

    Reply
  4. Pazlo

    Ditto on the fascination of the brain’s interpretive powers. So trained to recognize patterns, hence the development of the Rorschach’s ink-blot game.
    In photography, I’m often surprised myself when my brain sees this great image through the viewfinder, then upon review I note the image is not level and I recorded it differently than I composed it.
    I did a painting in oil once, rolling clouds of an occluded storm front. One day I saw it resting upside down, and was fooled by my own work, as it looked like waves rushing the shore.
    Combining the two potentials, I titled it “Squall Line Island”.

    Seek peace,

    Paz

    Reply

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