Monthly Archives: August 2018

“Tenacious”

“Tenacious”

“Most of the things worth doing in the world had been declared impossible before they were done.” 
― Louis D. Brandeis

I find myself drawn to anomalies, things that are out of place. This boulder amid the tumult of Bancroft’s Egan Chute is no exception. I have a feeling I have photographed it before, in slightly different conditions, but haven’t checked back to older photos. I’m certain the light on that occasion was not as nice and the waters a bit calmer.

It surprises me that this rock can hang on with the constant rush of water around it. Sure, it’s heavy, but the current is a force to be reckoned with. I also consider the force of ice in the winter, yet it hangs on.

I had a great day at Egan Chute, photographing the powerful churning waters and a few gentle side rivulets. Standing there, watching the might of this cascade, as the York River squeezes through a narrow defile and drops some 30 meters is simply breathtaking. A return visit in the autumn is definitely in order.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 100mm
1/3 sec, f/20.0 ISO 64

 

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“On the Edge”

“On the Edge”

“I liked watching more than I liked being part of it and for the first time I realized that it was OK to just be an observer. Some of us were actors and some of us were the audience. Both were important roles.” 
― Peter Monn

This photograph caused me a lot of conflict. As a photographer, ‘selfies’ really irk me. I’ve stood overlooking beautiful vistas only to be roughly shoved by crowds of tourists, each bearing a ‘selfie-stick’. There does not seem to be any appreciation for the beautiful views, rather, a desire to show that they were there, with no regard for the place itself.

In this case, I had returned to a beautiful waterfall near my camper. I went to enjoy the raw beauty of the place and capture some of this through photos.

When I arrived, a group of women pull up behind me and we greeted each other. I hiked in, hoping to get ahead of them to enjoy the place privately for a few minutes and then to make some photos.

Shortly after my arrival, the women and their daughters arrived and proceeded to spend the next hour taking pictures of each other, in various poses, with the beautiful waterfall in the background. They then proceeded down the steep slope and edged closer to the water, clambering over the sharp and slippery rocks to get Instagram worthy images. They even went so far as to get into various yoga poses among the raging waters. It was quite nerve-racking to witness this risky behaviour.

Despite this, I was able to make some quite interesting images from my vantage point. That’s where I’m conflicted. Despite the danger present before me, the opportunity for some very beautiful images also presented itself. To the point where I was not sure if I would post the photo at all. In the end I have decided to post the image, with my observations, since it is quite a lovely image.

It should be noted that this is a single, time exposed, image. Because the girl was sitting relatively still, she appears fairly sharp, the water is blurred by its rapid movement.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 100mm
1/3 sec, f/32.0 ISO 64

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“End of the Day” -Sauble Beach, Ontario

“End of the Day” - Sauble Beach, Ontario

“A large drop of sun lingered on the horizon and then dripped over and was gone, and the sky was brilliant over the spot where it had gone, and a torn cloud, like a bloody rag, hung over the spot of its going. And dusk crept over the sky from the eastern horizon, and darkness crept over the land from the east.” 
― John Steinbeck

Today’s post will be simple and short, accompanied by one of my favourite Steinbeck quotes. The image above was made two weekends ago at the end of a beautiful, hot day at the beach. The crowds are gone and a few people remain to enjoy the last few moments of sunlight.

One mad stands at the shore , the waves lapping at his feet and in the distance, a paddle boarder enjoys the relatively calm waters beyond the sandbars, which extend out almost that far. A very nice way to end the day.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/750 sec; f/1.8; ISO 20

“Sauble Sunset 2018”

“Sauble Sunset 2018”

“There’s a sunrise and a sunset every single day, and they’re absolutely free. Don’t miss so many of them.” 
― Jo Walton

I never get tired of sunsets, though I have to admit, I often miss sunrises.

This sunset, simply titled “Sauble Sunset 2018” is one of many photos of the sunset that evening, mere days ago, and is now one of many in an annual series.

Sauble Beach has been as summer destination for my family for the past few years and always delivers at least one spectacular sunset. This was no exception. We spent early evening and dusk playing various sports on the beech and swimming in the surf, our eyes on the sky, awaiting this moment. Many of the beach visitors had already left, heading home to distant towns and cities, leaving only a handful of observers on the shoreline to enjoy this in relative peace.

Despite the slight ‘chop’ on the water from the persistent winds, it was still hot, well into the evening, so a refreshing swim in the sunset was in order.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/250sec, f/8.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Warm Silk”

“Warm Silk”

“The summer waters caressed the shore,
like a lover, gently stroking the beach,
in sheets of warm silk”
– Ed Lehming

I fell in love with this image almost as soon as I made it. It captured the feeling of that hot August dusk along the shores of Lake Huron.

What had been quite a windy day throughout most of the daytime hours, turned soft and gentle, as the sun began to set slowly in the west. A calm descended and the throngs of beach goers departed, leaving a handful of us to revel in the final, beautiful, moments of the day.

It was still very hot, even for early August, and the retreat of the winds made this heat more evident. Yet a gentle breeze carried pockets of cool lake air over the sunset watchers arrayed along the beach. It was a time of quiet reflection, each in their own world, recalling the events of the day. It was also a time of cell phones and cameras as the observers tried to capture a piece of this singular moment to take with them into their busy work-weeks.

For me, reflecting back on this photo, brings me back to that exact time and place, where land, and water, and sky combined to create something so wonderfully soothing. I am so thankful for these moments.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Sunset Swell”

“Sunset Swell”

“One day, all your worries will set like the sun does and deserved happiness will come gushing like waves at the beach do. All you need to make sure is that your trips to beach never end.” 
― Jasleen Kaur Gumber

Another glorious end of day at Sauble Beach. Even the gentlest dusk breezes move the water into waves that endlessly lap at the shore. Some, a bit more aggressively than others.

I spent the day at the lakeshore, watching the character of the waves shift throughout the day; from powerful, rolling, two meter swells to the gentle rollers of twilight. It was, basically, a day for doing nothing other than experiencing the movement of water and sharing that time with friends and family. A rather nice way to spend the day.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/4 sec, f/16.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Churning”

“Churning”

“I love to feel the temperature drop and the wind increase just before a thunderstorm. Then I climb in bed with the thunder.” 
― Amanda Mosher

I wanted to revisit this storm cloud. This image was made mere seconds after my previously posted photo. Seconds make all the difference in the nature of these clouds. The form changes and the light shiftsdramatically. The other thing that changes rapidly, as noted in the quote I chose for this image, is the temperature. One minute its hot and humid and within seconds the wind whips harsh and chilly.

I simply loved watching this cloud change form. It was a rapid and significant change and I’m committed to trying my hand at time-lapse next time I get the opportunity. Even the tonal shift is startling, yet barely noticeable while observing it live. Yet, the photos show a big difference across a span of mere seconds. This cloud just boiled and seethed as the winds within it pulled and churned inside it. It makes me wonder just how intense those internal winds really are, given how fast things changed?

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 100mm
1/400 sec, f/10.0 ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com