Monthly Archives: September 2018

“Warm September Breezes”

“Warm September Breezes”

“We know that in September, we will wander through the warm winds of summer’s wreckage. We will welcome summer’s ghost.” 
― Heny Rollins

It struck me, as I considered this image, that the day I made it started out cool and calm, and gradually became quite warm breezy. Sometimes, we miss those gradual changes, even in the span of a few hours, let alone days. That gradual change also aligns to the theme of this series “In the Blink”, those changes that happen so gradually that we almost miss them, until some event reminds of what was.

The day I made this photo, as I mentioned in a previous post, I hiked some 24 km throughout the wonderful conservation areas so close to my home. These forests, meadows, farms and wetlands cover a vast area and I am deeply indebted to those who had the foresight to preserve them as natural spaces, many years ago.

Were t not for these spaces, I’m not sure what I would to find peace and solace after a busy workweek. I would not have a place close by to enjoy the diverse flora and fauna, a place to simply walk for hours, each turn a new wonder. Foremost, I would not have these wonderful scenes to photograph and share. In may cases, these refuges disappear forever, also in the blink of an eye, though, as with the changing of seasons, it’s a gradual thing, barely noticed, till one day, they are gone, ghosts of what was.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/4 sec, f/32.0 ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Bright Boundary”

“Bright Boundary”

“Ah, September! You are the doorway to the season that awakens my soul… but I must confess that I love you only because you are a prelude to my beloved October.” 
― Peggy Toney Horton

I like this image for its allusion to transition. The image fades from bright yellow, to the brooding darkness of the pine forest behind it. For me, it symbolises the shift from bright, sunny days, to the cool of autumn and, eventually, winter.

I prefer the boundary times, spring and autumn, because there is an accelerated shift in the environment, and ever present change. Summer and winter seem more steady and stable, with only slight changes. Summer is a time of warmth, bright greens, flowers, and activities, and winter is a time of cold, gray skies, ice and rest. Whereas autumn seems like it is changing daily. Leaves change colour and eventually fall to the ground, the temperature varies from warm to cold, rarely the same for more than a few days in a row.

This ‘doorway’ between seasons is, like the photo, a threshold to be crossed, and I hope to remain between the two seasons as long as they allow me to.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 112mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“September’s Yellow Sea”

“September’s Yellow Sea”

“That old September feeling, left over from school days, of summer passing, vacation nearly done, obligations gathering, books and football in the air … Another fall, another turned page: there was something of jubilee in that annual autumnal beginning, as if last year’s mistakes had been wiped clean by summer.” 
― Wallace Stegner

This image makes me grin. The pine trees appear to be awash or dancing in a sea of yellow created by the profusion of Goldenrod, unsteady on their feet. I say awash, because the various angles of the trunks makes them seem to be swaying in water, further enhanced by the deliberate camera motion.

They seemed a bit out-of-place, not quite part of the forest, yet not part of the meadow either. It’s a very bright scene further enhanced by the soft morning sunlight. The Goldenrod fills this meadow with bright and pure yellow, a sure sign that summer is winding down.

Yet, yellow is just a temporary thing, the yellow will eventually fade to orange and rust, and then be gone for months, its warm brightness replaced by the harsh whites of winter. So, I’ll drink it in, while I can, letting the sun warm me for a few more weeks and looking forward to the cool gentleness and bright colours of autumn.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 112mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0 ISO 280

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“The Edge of Autumn”

“The Edge of Autumn”

“There was no sudden, striking, and emotional transition. Like the warming of a room or the coming of daylight. When you first notice them they have already been going on for some time.” 
― C.S. Lewis

I’m starting a new series of images documenting the transition from late summer to autumn. The series will be titled “In the Blink” and begins with this image of pine trees, stripped bare of much of their bark and bordered by a field of Goldenrod.

As the quote says, this change is not sudden, it’s gradual and you barely notice it until you are in it. That was so much the case as I went on an extended 24 km hike, on a glorious mid September day.

I’ve been noticing some very slight changes in foliage around my house, though at first glance, everything is still very lush and green. Yet, flecks of yellow and red are starting to show through and many trees have dry, brown leaf edges. The summer started out hot and dry and stressed many plants, which recovered fairly well over the past few hot, rainy, and humid weeks. Still, the effects of the drought stress manifest in some early colour changes. Of course, all the late summer plants, like goldenrod and asters are in full bloom.

There’s still a lot of green and summer is not quite done with us, though the evenings are cooling off, days are not as hot as recently, and the light in the forest is simply beautiful for photography, another gentle, largely unnoticed shift towards autumn, which has been going on, for some time.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/4 sec, f/32.0 ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Egan Strata 4”

“Egan Strata 4”

“A thought that stayed with me was that I had entered a private place in the earth. I had seen exposed nearly its oldest part. I had lost my sense of urgency, rekindled a sense of what people were, clambering to gain access to high waterfalls and a sense of our endless struggle as a species to understand time and to estimate the consequences of our acts.” 
― Barry López

My final image, this one even more “map-like” than the previous posts. Were it not for the reflection of trees in the pooled water and the stray leaf in the foreground, it could be mistaken for an aerial photo of a mountain range.

I really like the flow, colour, and form of the rocks in this image. It feels like I have pulled up from the closer views and details to a broader vantage point.

Of the four images, I can’t pick a favourite. Each has its own unique character and feel. I’m looking forward to printing them and showing them as a collection.

“Egan Strata 3”

“Egan Strata 3”

“I went into geology because I like being outdoors, and because everybody in geology seemed, well, they all seemed like free spirits or renegades or something. You know, climbing mountains and hiking deserts and stuff.” 
― Kathy B. Steele

This is photo number three in the series. The image has much more water than the other images and shows much more structure than the prior images, yet all the elements of the image are similar.

The pooled water reminded me of a three dimensional topographic map of the area, with lakes filling the deep valleys between the ancient rocks of the Canadian Shield. I would have prefered an image looking straight down to further enhance this effect, but I could not get a satisfactory composition.

You’ll also note that some of the rocks are still wet and that the water has already begun to evaporate after a heavy overnight rainfall.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/210 sec; f/1.8; ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Egan Strata 2”

“Egan Strata 2”

“Everything dreams. The play of form, of being, is the dreaming of substance. Rocks have their dreams, and the earth changes….” 
― Ursula K. Le Guin

Image two of this series of photos of the wonderful rock formations at Egan Chute. I found it interesting, despite my education in geology, that the form and flow of the rock really resonated with me, not for the first time, but very strongly. Enough to make this series of images.

I find myself enjoying these images and really appreciating the detail, the small clumps of moss, fallen leaves, and the layering of the rock itself. All things I observed when making the image, but diluted by the vastness of the stone itself and the constant roar of rushing water at my side. The little triangular pool of water is the focus of the image, so temporary within the seeming permanence of the rock, yet it’s the water which wears the rock down, trapped with no escape, except through evaporation in the hot summer sun.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/250 sec; f/1.8; ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com