Author Archives: Ed Lehming Photography

About Ed Lehming Photography

My photography focuses primarily on nature and landscapes, though I have ventured into the world of abstraction, architecture, portraiture, and street photography. To me, photography is the art of observation. It’s about finding beautiful things in ordinary places. My photography has very little to do with what I see and everything to do with how I see them as well as how they make me feel. Call me a photographic impressionist, if you will. I want people to look at my photos and say, “What am I looking at, what’s happening here, and how was this done?” Lately, my focus has been on pursuing the art of photographic abstractions, using lighting, motion, and strong vertical elements to create the “Trees & Forests” series of photographs. Joining the recently formed “A Place for the Arts”, artist’s co-op in Bancroft has allowed me to show many of my work in a beautiful creative space where other artists share their works and ideas. Many of my photos have been featured in magazine articles, web sites, and church bulletin covers. Over the past few years, I have entered several pieces in the Markham Fair where they have garnered many first place ribbons, in various categories, as well as “Best in Show” for my Black and White entry in 2014. My intent, through blogging is to share my photographs with a broader audience and be able to share, in words, some of my thoughts about the actual photo. I hope you enjoy your visits to this blog and recognise that all the photos are available for purchase via my web-site. Your support through purchases enables me to keep my equipment in good order and affords more opportunity to advance my passion.

“Honeybee and Oregano Blossoms”

“Honey Bee and Oregano Blossoms”

We have to know our place in the ecosystem of which we are a part, and this means living ‘consciously’: being aware of nature and how it affects us and how we, in turn, affect nature.” 
― Sebastian Pole

I am so pleased lately to see so many bees. For the past few years they have been scarce, especially honeybees. There are many pollinators out there, but honeybees have been exceptionally rare around here. It’s a frightening thought, to lose our bees, though I know many efforts have been made to preserve and increase the population. Thankfully, those efforts seem to be paying off.

When I went out today to check on my herb garden, it was with great pleasure that I noted the many honeybees flying from flower to flower. Purple, seems to be the draw this month.

Of the many images I made today, this one pleased me the most. The bee itself is in sharp focus yet even at 1/400 sof a second, the wings are still a blur, emphasizing the speed with which these bees move. It was, despite the bright light, tough to get a clear shot. But, here it is, a moment in the garden, the cycle of life, captured.

One of the pleasures of gardening is having these processes close by. The oregano plant itself is from last year’s planting, asi t winters over quite well. This garden also has basil, mint, and rosemary, but the oregano is the one with the bright, fragrant blossoms. Of course, bees were not the only participants, numerous flies, wasps, and beetles joined in the feast, but the honeybee stole the show for me.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/200 sec, f/16.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Tuesdays of Texture | Week 30 of 2017

“Nodding in the Garden”

“If it comes, let it come. If it goes, it’s ok, let it go. Let things come and go. Don’t let anything disturb your peace. Stay calm and carry on.” 
― Germany Kent

“Nodding in the Garden”

Here is my entry for Del Monte Y Mar’s Tuesdays of Texture Challenge Week 30 of 2017

 I had no particular reason for making this image, other than it was peaceful. That’s often the way of it; I have no intention of making a particular image, it’s simply there, and it appeals to me. Often, I don’t even know why at the time, I just know I need to capture this moment. It’s not till I sit down to review the images of the day that I become aware of the ‘why’.
In the case of this image of purple hosta blossoms, the ‘why’ is still not revealing itself to me. So, I sit and enjoy it, for what it is, taking in the colours and textures, reveling in the memory of a soft, summer day.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/125 sec, f/16.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Common Yellow Wood Sorrel”

“Common Yellow Wood Sorrel”

“When you overlook the small blessings in your life, chances are that no amount of blessings would ever make you happy.” 
― Edmond Mbiaka

I thought today I’d go out and capture a very simple image of a flower, which sadly, flourishes in my gardens. I have no idea where it came from, but I do know it loves to call my gardens home, despite me constantly weeding it out.

The plant is known as common yellow wood sorrel and starts out looking like a three leafed clover, till it blooms with it’s pretty yellow flowers. Yet, after a while it shows up everywhere and I can hardly keep up with it by the end of the summer.

In the good soil of my gardens it grows to a height of nearly 20 centimeters and seems to fill every vacant patch of garden, if not quickly removed. It’s doing particularly well this year, with our non-stop rainfalls.

So, I decided to make a photo of it, close up, so that I could “try’ to appreciate it. And I do, it’s a beautiful little flower, but I’d appreciate it more if it was not so prolific in  my gardens.  🙂

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/200 sec, f/16.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Progression” – Hosta Blossom

“Progression”

“Peculiar I say, how so often the smallest, most seemingly insignificant details later unveil their faces as vital means for progression.” 
― Criss Jami

What struck me about this image of a stem of hosta blossoms was the progression of the flowers along the stem. The bottom three are spent flowers from the previous day, the next two above are in full bloom, and above, new blossoms are forming.

I’ve considered photographing them before, but they have not appealed to me, for some reason. Yet, this time around, I really noticed this pattern of blossoms, progressing up the stem and decided to document it and spend some time appreciating it. The individual blossoms are quite pretty as well, yet seem lost in the space between them.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.5 sec, f/32.0 ISO 200

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Purple Pillar”

“Purple Pillar”

“The possession of knowledge does not kill the sense of wonder and mystery. There is always more mystery.” 
― Anaïs Nin

An unknown butterfly on an unknown flower. It really bothers me not to be able to identify the subject matter of my photos, but I can’t figure out what either is. The purple flowers grow in a small cluster in a single location. I’m wondering if it’s an escapee from somebody’s garden. Standing over a meter tall this plant has six leaves coming from a central node and beautiful stalks of purple flowers. It may be Culver’s Root, but it seems out of place.

The butterfly may be a skipper, but I don’t recognise it from below.

It was, however, a brief opportunity to get a photo of the butterfly feeding on the flower, quickly composed and shot before the butterfly took off and the moment was gone, leaving me with a mystery to solve.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/80 sec, f/16.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Summer’s Splendour”

“Summer’s Splendour”

“Happiness is not a thing – it is a feeling; a way of joyful living and being. It comes from inner fulfilment and appreciating the world you live in.” 
― Rasheed Ogunlaru

I could not think of a more suitable title for this studio image of a purple coneflower from my garden. As I look at the flow of the petals and the incredible order of the disk florets, glowing in the light.

It’s something almost magical to behold and I find the isolation technique I use makes those details stand out even more. I’ve spent quite a bit of time with this image, simply enjoying the textures and structures of this beautiful blossom, dotted with tiny grains of pollen. Appreciating the whole by observing the component parts that make up the whole.

I’m finding these images and the time I spend composing the shots has made me more aware of many of these details as I observe the flowers and wildlife outdoors even more deliberately. I try to turn off the filters my brain has learned over the years, to see the blossom like this, naturally.

It’s becoming a journey to live life in the same manner. Some call it mindfulness, or living in the moment. I like to look at it is deliberate appreciation for the world around me. It’s also making it easier for me to compose better images, as I’m learning to see things for more than just an object to be photographed, but rather, an opportunity to preserve the essence of what I’m seeing. Writing about these experiences is helping tremendously, as the process of writing slows my brain down and causes me to more carefully consider the image and what I want to share about it and the process that led to its creation.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/200 sec, f/16.0 ISO 200

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Busy Bee”

“Busy Bee”

“Everyone is busy, yet we all have access to the same amount of time.” 
― Chris Guillebeau

The prevalent activity around here lately is bees and blooms. It’s so nice to see bees after a few years where bees, particularly honeybees, seemed to be quite scarce around here. I returned to my patch of Canada Thistle and simply stood for a while, watching all the activity, including the numerous species of pollinators.

From small to large, plump to thin, the bees, wasps, and various flies were busy collecting the bounty of nectar these wildflowers had to offer. It was not till I spent a few minutes standing there, observing, that I noticed the sweet smell emanating from the thistles. It’s something I had as yet been unaware of. As the fragrance drifted around me it is no small wonder that so many insects were drawn to this large patch.

Of all the harvesters, this mid sized bee is the one that caught my eye. Most bees and wasps would land on a blossom and spend quite a while going to each individual component flowerette and collecting the nectar. This bee, on the other hand, flitted from blossom to blossom, spending mere seconds on each. It truly was a busy bee. The image above represents a split second where it slowed long enough for me to capture a sharp image of it.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0 ISO 200

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com