Category Archives: Abstract

“Spring Thaw, but not quite”

“Spring Thaw, but not quite”

“Mist to mist, drops to drops. For water thou art, and unto water shalt thou return.”
― Kamand Kojouri

While the snow is gone in all but the deepest woodland areas near home, that’s not the case a few hours drive north of here.

Yesterday, I drove north to switch out some artwork in a co-op gallery I am associated with in Bancroft, Ontario and had the opportunity to drive around and make some photos. We also have a camper in the area, which we walked to, since the roads were still partially snow covered and the clear parts were soft, soupy much, as the frost was coming out of the ground. Interesting times many living in cities with paved roads never consider, but it’s a fact of life in the near north.

Marble Lake, the small spring fed lake that our camper is on was still frozen, but beginning to thaw on the surface, sort of. The mild days, with sunshine and above freezing temperatures, melt the surface, which re-freezes overnight. This freezing and thawing makes for some interesting effects.

This is exhibited in the attached photo. Apparently, the leaf had fallen onto the melted surface on a milder day and sunk to the ice beneath the water, that water froze overnight. Now, the slightly submerged leaf absorbs sunlight the next day, melting the ice around it, just a bit faster than the surrounding ice, creating an indentation, which capture other items blowing across the surface and freezing once more, as the temperatures drop. Bubbles of air rise from below and accumulate, getting bigger over time. I thought it made for an interesting composition and an opportunity to capture a small section of a process happening all over the area.

In a few days, the process will accelerate, the remaining ice will drop beneath the surface and the lake will be fully exposed. A process I would love to document one day, as I’ve only seen portions of it.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/2500 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“AGO Stairs in Mono”


This is perhaps the most photographed staircase in Toronto. The Douglas Fir clad stairs were designed by Frank Gehry as part of a major renovation of the Art Gallery of Ontario, known as the AGO and completed in 2008.

The curves, textures, and play of light are a photographer’s dream. I’ve made several images of the staircase, which extends up 5 stories and has 138 steps, but have never noticed this angle, which is shot from directly below the base. Had it not been for two small children looking up at it, I may have missed this opportunity. Ah, the eyes of children. They really do see things in the most wonderful ways.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/30 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 40

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“The Thaw”

“The Thaw”

“The common eye sees only the outside of things, and judges by that, but the seeing eye pierces through and reads the heart and the soul.”
― Mark Twain

I had no idea just how interesting something as mundane as melting ice could be.

The image I chose for today is a large slab of lake ice which had begun to melt. The gradual melting process showed some very intricate crystalline structures within the ice, made even more dramatic by the extreme purity of the ice. I keep finding myself staring deep into the clear columns, wishing I had something bright with me that I could have put behind the slab. That, would make it even more beautiful.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/60 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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Tuesdays of Texture – Week 14

“Frozen Movement”

“Frozen Movement”

“Dream delivers us to dream, and there is no end to illusion. Life is like a train of moods like a string of beads, and, as we pass through them, they prove to be many-colored lenses which paint the world their own hue. . . . ”
― Ralph Waldo Emerson

Here is my entry for Del Monte Y Mar’s Tuesdays of Texture Challenge Week 14 of 2017.

Please excuse the contradictory title of this image, but that is how I saw it. The frozen surface of the Lynde Shores Marsh, its protective coating of snow, blown away, looked just like waves, frozen in time.

Though the surface is quite smooth, patches of melted and refrozen snow, add bright highlights, small cracks and imperfections are slightly darker or lighter, depending on their nature. When viewed in isolation, without context, this could be gently rolling waves on a tropical sea, but is in reality, far from it.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 210mm
1/250sec, f/9.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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Monochrome Mondays -“Fractured”

“Fractured”

“One small crack does not mean that you are broken, it means that you were put to the test and you didn’t fall apart.”
― Linda Poindexter

This is photo of an ice sheet below a local dam. Because of the nature of the churning water and constant movement, the ice sheet becomes a visual record of the changes in water flow and temperature though its jagged surface. I thought it made for a nice piece of natural abstract art.

As I searched for an appropriate quote to compliment the image, none of the quotes seemed to align well with my feelings about this image. You’d think with the multitude of writings on fractures or brokenness, and there are more than I would have considered, very few focussed in breaking and healing as an ongoing and natural process.

In the case of the ice sheet, if the ice did not flex, break, and refreeze it would stop the waterflow and eventually release explosively as pressure built up below it. But the small cracks, which eventually seal up, prevent this from happening.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/500 sec, f/11.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“What Lies Beneath”

“What Lies Beneath”

“The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead: his eyes are closed.”
― Albert Einstein

There is something magical about ice, by times. During this past week’s thaw and freezing, some interesting effects were created. Far too many to share in a single post. Ice has formed into a myriad of shapes, forms, and textures.

As I went for a long needed hike today, along the familiar banks of Duffins Creek, a moderately sized creek that runs close to my home, I was greeted by a mix of flowing open water and frozen shorelines. Most of the scenes were fairly typical and not much stood out as unique, until I came to a bend in the creek where the ice had not quite formed yet. It was at that point where it was a very firm slush and still a bit transparent, allowing me to see the blurry outlines of the pebbles below. What made it more interesting, to me, was the chunks of ice included in this natural composition, as well as some trapped bubbles. That, and the beautiful February sunlight that lit the creek bed through the ice.

As I stood there, making the image, I realized that this spot is only a few meters away from where I made my favourite Rainbow Trout image this past spring. This beautiful creek has offered me many lovely memories, and photos, over the past few years.

It seems nature never runs out of unique combinations of elements in her toolkit with which to create artworks. I’m just happy to be able to participate in her latest showing.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com