Category Archives: Art

Iceland – Day 5

“Grjótárhnjúkur” - North Iceland

“Grjótárhnjúkur” – North Iceland 

“Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry it with us, or we find it not.” 
― Ralph Waldo Emerson

On a day that started out dull, and blanketed in low cloud and with little promise of sights to photograph, we set out on the still icy road which would lead us to a stop at Goðafoss, a much photographed waterfall just off the main highway, a lovely lunch in the city of Akureyri, and finally, our overnight stay at a guesthouse in Svinvatn, a small interior lake.

As we approached Goðafoss, the sky began to brighten, but a layer of cloud still blocked the sun, but made for good conditions to photograph the waterfall, post to follow at a later date.

With the highlight of our day completed, we headed out of Akureyri, the second largest city in Iceland, following a long valley through the mountain range that rises on the western edge of the Eyjafjörður fjord.

With the sky just slightly overcast, the drive through the valley was lovely, and yielded a few ‘decent’ photos. I the distance, we could see a mountain peak, a bit hazy in the distance, lit up by the sun. We kept watching, as the peak began to come into sharper view, snow whipping from its snow covered summit.

We pulled over along the road to make a few photos of this interesting vista before us. Then, suddenly, magic happened. As I stood ready to make a photo, the clouds overhead changed the light, ever so slightly and bathed the valley before me in a wonderful golden hue and the world before me was like a scene from a dream, then it was gone again. But, I was able to capture that one brief moment as a photo I will treasure for a long time. The long valley, with the snowy mountain. A miracle of light and timing.

So, a ho hum day, became a day of sheer joy. That seems to be the nature of Iceland, you always have to be prepared for something new and wonderful, despite icy roads and gray skies.

What an incredible change from yesterday’s icy drive.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 145 mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Three Along the Way”

“Three Along the Way”

“The tree which moves some to tears of joy is in the eyes of others only a green thing that stands in the way. Some see nature all ridicule and deformity… and some scarce see nature at all. But to the eyes of the man of imagination, nature is imagination itself.” 
― William Blake

As I walk the local trails, I’m often quite aware that, at some point, the trailblazers and foresters had to make choices about what trees remained and what trees needed to be felled. As the trails meander to and fro, it’s clear that conscious decisions were made to avoid having to cut certain trees.

I suppose, being a cluster of three, tightly grouped, makes you less vulnerable to the chainsaw, however well intentioned. There are many such clusters along the trails and the path always gently flexes around them. For me, each of the trees I pass tell a bit of the story about the formation of this trail system, so many years ago. As the story emerges, I am ever grateful to those who had the foresight to set these lands apart for our future enjoyment, one tree at a time.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/4 sec, f/22.0 ISO 400

“Another Season Done” – near Glasgow

Lone Tree in Plowed Field near Glasgow

“You expected to be sad in the fall. Part of you died each year when the leaves fell from the trees and their branches were bare against the wind and the cold, wintery light. But you knew there would always be the spring, as you knew the river would flow again after it was frozen”
– Ernest Hemingway

The theme of my posts, of late, has been leftover or left behind photos. All this because I’m preparing for a local Studio Tour and using my blog posts in my photo catalogue, because people like to hear some of the story and process behind the photos. That’s the reason I started blogging in the first place.

So, here I am reviewing one of my more popular photos from 2014, one I have as yet, not written about.

This “lone tree” stands in a farm field near Glasgow, Ontario, A few short moments drive from my house. I have made innumerable photos of this tree, in all seasons, yet this particular image remains my most popular. There is a warm glow from the clouds as the sun begins to set and the empty furrows lead the eye to this single tree. It’s quite a deliberate shot and all the elements combine to make it appealing to a wider audience.

Interestingly, though it was made in late November of 2012, it does not feel sad or cold. It simply feels at peace, as another season draws to a close and we look forward to the comfort of a warm heart as winter slowly approaches.

Nikon D300
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 80mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

“A Shift to Bronze”

“A Shift to Bronze”

“I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.” 
― L. M. Montgomery

As I prepare for my 2018 Studio Tour, it gives me time to reflect on present photos, as well as those from previous years and I am astounded about how many have been printed, yet I have not taken the time to comment on them.

This image is one of those photos that for one reason or another was set aside. Interestingly, as I was preparing images for the Studio Tour, this one was chosen by three different individuals to be included.

The photo was made last autumn, a week after last year’s Tour. It was interesting, because the Tour weekend falls on the weekend after Canadian Thanksgiving, usually a peak period for autumn colours and I was slightly bemoaning the fact that I was missing out on this.

The day was cool, and windy, but the leaves were still hanging on quite well, despite this. Much of the predominant green and yellow was starting to fade and oranges, golds and bronzes were taking hold. It was the start of my “Golden Paths” series and has become one of my more powerful series of autumn images.

Here, I’m hiking past a familiar cluster of birch trees, with their yellow leaves just starting to wither and backfilled with the golden bronzes of the many beech trees. It really represents that ‘shift’ in colours so prominent at that particular time of year.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/4 sec, f/32.0 ISO 100

“Light and Motion”

Light & Motion on Merced River (Happy Isles Area)

“Oh, these vast, calm, measureless mountain days, inciting at once to work and rest! Days in whose light everything seems equally divine, opening a thousand windows to show us God. Nevermore, however weary, should one faint by the way who gains the blessings of one mountain day; whatever his fate, long life, short life, stormy or calm, he is rich forever.” 
― John Muir

I simply had to quote John Muir for this image that I made several years ago, as I began to experiment with long exposures to communicate the ‘feel’ of a place. The image itself is of the Merced River in California’s Yosemite national Park. It’s become a sacred place for me, one I have made several pilgrimages back to over the years.

This is a simple composition, made at the “Happy Isles” portion of the river, as its icy waters flood over centuries old river rock. There is colour and life; light and motion here. It’s a place I could sit for hours, simply enjoying the freshness and listen to the waters rush over the stones.

The photograph, has sat on my computer, perhaps waiting till I was ready to present it. I believe it’s time, so I have printed it as a 48″ canvas print for my upcoming Studio Tour.

Nikon D300
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 70mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

“The Edge of Autumn”

“The Edge of Autumn”

“There was no sudden, striking, and emotional transition. Like the warming of a room or the coming of daylight. When you first notice them they have already been going on for some time.” 
― C.S. Lewis

I’m starting a new series of images documenting the transition from late summer to autumn. The series will be titled “In the Blink” and begins with this image of pine trees, stripped bare of much of their bark and bordered by a field of Goldenrod.

As the quote says, this change is not sudden, it’s gradual and you barely notice it until you are in it. That was so much the case as I went on an extended 24 km hike, on a glorious mid September day.

I’ve been noticing some very slight changes in foliage around my house, though at first glance, everything is still very lush and green. Yet, flecks of yellow and red are starting to show through and many trees have dry, brown leaf edges. The summer started out hot and dry and stressed many plants, which recovered fairly well over the past few hot, rainy, and humid weeks. Still, the effects of the drought stress manifest in some early colour changes. Of course, all the late summer plants, like goldenrod and asters are in full bloom.

There’s still a lot of green and summer is not quite done with us, though the evenings are cooling off, days are not as hot as recently, and the light in the forest is simply beautiful for photography, another gentle, largely unnoticed shift towards autumn, which has been going on, for some time.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/4 sec, f/32.0 ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Egan Strata 3”

“Egan Strata 3”

“I went into geology because I like being outdoors, and because everybody in geology seemed, well, they all seemed like free spirits or renegades or something. You know, climbing mountains and hiking deserts and stuff.” 
― Kathy B. Steele

This is photo number three in the series. The image has much more water than the other images and shows much more structure than the prior images, yet all the elements of the image are similar.

The pooled water reminded me of a three dimensional topographic map of the area, with lakes filling the deep valleys between the ancient rocks of the Canadian Shield. I would have prefered an image looking straight down to further enhance this effect, but I could not get a satisfactory composition.

You’ll also note that some of the rocks are still wet and that the water has already begun to evaporate after a heavy overnight rainfall.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/210 sec; f/1.8; ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com