Category Archives: Art

“The Edge of Autumn”

“The Edge of Autumn”

“There was no sudden, striking, and emotional transition. Like the warming of a room or the coming of daylight. When you first notice them they have already been going on for some time.” 
― C.S. Lewis

I’m starting a new series of images documenting the transition from late summer to autumn. The series will be titled “In the Blink” and begins with this image of pine trees, stripped bare of much of their bark and bordered by a field of Goldenrod.

As the quote says, this change is not sudden, it’s gradual and you barely notice it until you are in it. That was so much the case as I went on an extended 24 km hike, on a glorious mid September day.

I’ve been noticing some very slight changes in foliage around my house, though at first glance, everything is still very lush and green. Yet, flecks of yellow and red are starting to show through and many trees have dry, brown leaf edges. The summer started out hot and dry and stressed many plants, which recovered fairly well over the past few hot, rainy, and humid weeks. Still, the effects of the drought stress manifest in some early colour changes. Of course, all the late summer plants, like goldenrod and asters are in full bloom.

There’s still a lot of green and summer is not quite done with us, though the evenings are cooling off, days are not as hot as recently, and the light in the forest is simply beautiful for photography, another gentle, largely unnoticed shift towards autumn, which has been going on, for some time.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/4 sec, f/32.0 ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Egan Strata 3”

“Egan Strata 3”

“I went into geology because I like being outdoors, and because everybody in geology seemed, well, they all seemed like free spirits or renegades or something. You know, climbing mountains and hiking deserts and stuff.” 
― Kathy B. Steele

This is photo number three in the series. The image has much more water than the other images and shows much more structure than the prior images, yet all the elements of the image are similar.

The pooled water reminded me of a three dimensional topographic map of the area, with lakes filling the deep valleys between the ancient rocks of the Canadian Shield. I would have prefered an image looking straight down to further enhance this effect, but I could not get a satisfactory composition.

You’ll also note that some of the rocks are still wet and that the water has already begun to evaporate after a heavy overnight rainfall.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/210 sec; f/1.8; ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Egan Strata 2”

“Egan Strata 2”

“Everything dreams. The play of form, of being, is the dreaming of substance. Rocks have their dreams, and the earth changes….” 
― Ursula K. Le Guin

Image two of this series of photos of the wonderful rock formations at Egan Chute. I found it interesting, despite my education in geology, that the form and flow of the rock really resonated with me, not for the first time, but very strongly. Enough to make this series of images.

I find myself enjoying these images and really appreciating the detail, the small clumps of moss, fallen leaves, and the layering of the rock itself. All things I observed when making the image, but diluted by the vastness of the stone itself and the constant roar of rushing water at my side. The little triangular pool of water is the focus of the image, so temporary within the seeming permanence of the rock, yet it’s the water which wears the rock down, trapped with no escape, except through evaporation in the hot summer sun.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/250 sec; f/1.8; ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Egan Strata 1”

“Egan Strata 1”

“It was during my enchanted days of travel that the idea came to me, which, through the years, has come into my thoughts again and again and always happily—the idea that geology is the music of the earth.” 
― Hans Cloos

A few weeks back, I visited Egan Chutes, a beautiful series of elongated waterfalls near Bancroft, Ontario. I simply love the raw power of the chutes, as the waters of the York River plummet through a narrow defile in the rocks. The rocks themselves are heavily metamorphosed volcanic rock, part of the Canadian Shield and among the oldest rocks in the world.

And so, my inner geologist emerges and become one with the artist and photographer. You see, my background is actually in Mining Engineering, though I never found work in that field, yet I remain fascinated by rocks and geological structures. To me, the rhythms and folds of the rock are nature’s canvas.

Over the next few days, I will share a series of images titles “Egan Strata”, a documentary on the wonderful folds and complex structures that form the base of Egan Chute, the highest and foremost of the three chutes that make up this natural wonder.

I was blessed by several days of rain prior to my arrival, and the water that fills the creases and cracks in the rock further enhancing the rugged beauty found here. Perhaps it’s just me and my admiration for natural forms, but I find them quite stunning and I hope you enjoy them as well.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/120 sec; f/1.8; ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Web-World”

“Web-World”

“Sometimes strands spend a long time seeking each other, fumbling without light, and interweave without knowing that it is exactly what the web wants.” 
― Emmi Itäranta

I can’t even comprehend the connections in this tent caterpillar nest that I discovered along the trail today. As a child, I recall poking and prodding at them, breaking them open and watching the caterpillars fall out in numbers too large to count. This nest was unmolested by young boys with sticks and the light caught it in such a way that it twinkled against the dark bushes behind it.

I stood transfixed by the complexity of it, as if a microscopic universe danced before me, small particles trapped within the weave of filaments, including a spiky seed which must have floated into the nest and became trapped. I’d never considered just how beautiful a caterpillar nest could be, but the right light made it into something completely different, especially close up.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/250 sec, f/8.0 ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Warm Silk”

“Warm Silk”

“The summer waters caressed the shore,
like a lover, gently stroking the beach,
in sheets of warm silk”
– Ed Lehming

I fell in love with this image almost as soon as I made it. It captured the feeling of that hot August dusk along the shores of Lake Huron.

What had been quite a windy day throughout most of the daytime hours, turned soft and gentle, as the sun began to set slowly in the west. A calm descended and the throngs of beach goers departed, leaving a handful of us to revel in the final, beautiful, moments of the day.

It was still very hot, even for early August, and the retreat of the winds made this heat more evident. Yet a gentle breeze carried pockets of cool lake air over the sunset watchers arrayed along the beach. It was a time of quiet reflection, each in their own world, recalling the events of the day. It was also a time of cell phones and cameras as the observers tried to capture a piece of this singular moment to take with them into their busy work-weeks.

For me, reflecting back on this photo, brings me back to that exact time and place, where land, and water, and sky combined to create something so wonderfully soothing. I am so thankful for these moments.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Looming”

“Looming”

“There is peace even in the storm” 
― Vincent van Gogh

I’m one of those people who loves storms. There is something in the unbridled power of them that fascinates me. I love the many forms that the clouds take as the winds whip and shape them. There is also something glorious in the way the storm changes the light.

A few days ago, after coming home from a nice dinner with my wife, I saw this storm cloud forming behind my house. I ran inside, grabbed my camera, and made a few images as it quickly billowed higher into the sky, changing form every second, hoping to capture it at it’s peak, before it tore itself apart or diffused. I was also working with great light and did not want to miss the bright rays playing off the sky behind it and within the cloud itself.

My goal is always to capture an image representative of what I saw, as well as how I perceived it. Here, I was trying to capture the play of early evening light within the cloud as well as the ominous feeling of the deep tones within the cloud. I think I succeeded in both and am very pleased with the results of a quickly composed shot.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 100mm
1/400 sec, f/10.0 ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com