Category Archives: Cityscapes

Thursday Doors | September 28, 2017

“Blacksmith Shop” Black Creek Pioneer Village

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Blacksmith Shop” Black Creek Pioneer Village

It’s been a while since I’ve posted on Thursday Doors. Getting ready for a local Studio Tour has taken much of my time, as well as an expanded work role. In fact my blog posts in general have dropped off, so I find myself with a little time to go through my accumulated images, of which doors are always an element.

This image was made a full two weeks ago, at Toronto’s Black Creek Pioneer Village, where I volunteer every year for the annual Pioneer Fest. Unlike the past few years of rain and cold, this year was hot and bright, yet leaves had started turning, which made for some interesting images.

I’ve always admired this blacksmith shop, with its large inviting doors. They are also functional in helping with ventilation, as this place gets pretty hot and smokey. I made this composition by deliberately positioning the tree in the foreground, to hide a junk pile along the side of the building. It also creates a nice ‘frame’ as the branches drape across the roof.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/370 sec; f/1.8; ISO 20

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Thursday Doors | August 17, 2017

“582 Sherbourne Street” James Copper House, Toronto

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors. 

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“582 Sherbourne Street” James Cooper House, Toronto

Today, a return to another of the grand old houses of Toronto’s Sherbourne Street. This one has fascinated me for some time now. Whenever I drive by, I’m drawn to the interesting statues installed on the property. So, when I had the opportunity to walk the area a few weeks ago, this was definitely on my list of places to check out.

I had no idea of the history of this majestic “Second Empire” style building. The building was built in 1881 for James Cooper, a wealthy merchant and show retailer. This area was one of the wealthiest places in Toronto at the time the house was built and it’s in the best condition. After Cooper departed, the building became home to the Keeley Institute for Nervous Diseases, an organization assisting those with alcohol and substance abuse problems. In 1910, it became home to the Toronto Knights of Columbus, who used the facility as a meeting and fundraising venue for almost a century. In 2008 the property was purchased by the Tridel Group, with the intention of building a condominium tower on the site, which is designated by the City of Toronto as a heritage building, so it had to be preserved. Or, in this case, moved.

It turns out, it’s also one of the heaviest moves of a building in Canadian history. In 2008, the 800 ton building was moved twenty feet east and five feet south from its original location, to make room for a condominium tower being built on the same property. The move cost the developer a reported $1M but preserved an architectural treasure from Toronto’s past. The developer has taken great care to maintain the house, which serves as an amenities centre for the adjacent condominium tower.

Oh, yes, and back to the statues, the property has several, all in a wildlife motif, with wolves, stags, and foxes attached to metal bases, with a reflected statue beneath it. The wolf and the fox sit horizontal, but the stag is a vertical installation, quite eye catching. I’ve included the Google Streetview link, though it does not do it justice, as well as an image of the house being moved.

The things you learn when you look for nice doors.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/120 sec; f/1.8; ISO 32

Thursday Doors | August 10, 2017

“572 Sherbourne Street” - Toronto

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“572 Sherbourne Street” – Toronto

Nestled among tall apartment buildings and office towers along Toronto’s Sherbourne Street, sits a small group of eight houses, in various states of repair. All are slightly different, but would have been built in the same time period. Over the years, different owners would add or remove features, making the houses even more dissimilar. That is part of what I find appealing about older parts of the city. Every building has its own character, its own story.

This one in particular still has what I assume is the original door, based on the width and millwork. I’m sure it has more than one coat of paint. The brickwork closer to the ground is starting to show the effects of many winters exposed to road salt and the numerous holes above the handrail are evidence of accessories added and removed over time.

It would be interesting to find other photos, across the years to see just how many changes these doorways overgo across time.

For those interested, here’s a Google Streetview image of the location.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/140 sec; f/1.8; ISO 25

Thursday Doors | June 22, 2017

“322 Dundas Street West” - Toronto

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“322 Dundas Street West” – Toronto

In this image, it’s the doorway, not so much the doors that draw my attention. Along this stretch of Toronto heritage buildings, and across from the Art Gallery of Ontario, this one really stands out, with its fuchsia columns and yellow brick. I had to go through my media library to verify I had not posted it previously and it turns out that I have not.

I found that odd, that I have not yet posted an image of doors that I have enjoyed for several years. As it turns out, my oldest daughter’s friend lived here for a few years. It is a small world.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/300 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 80

Thursday Doors | May 25, 2017

“Royal Ontario Museum - Events Entrance”

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Royal Ontario Museum – Events Entrance”

Today, A return to the east side, and the former main entrance of the Royal Ontario, or ROM, as it is known locally. This image was made at the same time as my previous ROM door image back in March. These doors, are a closer view of the right hand door of the three sets of doors that make up this entrance. This image shows off a bit more of the beautiful carving above the door. On further inspection, which was not possible from the wider image, the iron florets  and handles are also very interesting and it would appear that the right handle door handle was broken and repaired at one time.

As the sign says, the doors are used for, or were at one time used for special events, though I can’t recall ever seeing anyone use them.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/120 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 32

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

Thursday Doors – May 11, 2017

“St. Marys Anglican Church” - Richmond Hill

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“St. Mary’s Anglican Church” – Richmond Hill

Today’s ‘doors’ post is multipurpose. First of all, this church has a beautiful original door, circa 1874. I’ve shared the door, close up, previously, but wanted to share it again in a different season, when the building is not obscured by trees. Secondly, in small towns around Ontario, there is an event called “Doors Open Ontario“. It’s an opportunity for the public to go inside many buildings, be they historical, specialized, or just interesting, as see what’s behind the doors they pass daily. The Doors Open event for the town of Richmond Hill is this Saturday, May 13th, and I made the image for the church to use for the event as well as their service bulletins.

The final reason, for those in the Richmond Hill area, is that I have been asked to show some of my photography, alongside other artists who attend this church. So, it’s a good chance to see behind the doors, meet new people, and purchase some art.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/3700 sec;   f/1.8;  ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Thursday Doors – May 04, 2017

“Dundas Street West” - Toronto

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Dundas Street West” – Toronto

These doors are conveniently located across from Toronto’s Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO). I see them every time I visit the gallery and am always meaning to snap a shot. So, this past weekend, after seeing a wonderful Georgia O’Keeffe exhibit, I did just that.

There are a number of wonderful old houses on this block of Dundas Street West, most have become boutiques or galleries, catering to the AGO patrons, but several have remained as residences.

I do enjoy observing ‘paired’ doors, as each tenant seems to have a slightly different slant on what the entranceway to their home should look like. These to are quite similar, with a few subtle differences.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/340 sec;   f/1.8;  ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com