Category Archives: Plants & Flowers

TUESDAYS OF TEXTURE | WEEK 17 OF 2017

“Warm Fuzzies of Spring”

“Warm Fuzzies of Spring”

Here is my entry for Del Monte Y Mar’s Tuesdays of Texture Challenge Week 17 of 2017

I could not help myself with the title of this image of an emerging bud, covered in soft hairs, which actually protect the tender leaves from frosty mornings by retaining warmth. It was also a wonderful, warm spring day, so the warm and fuzzy just made sense. It automatically became my go-to image for texture this week.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0 ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“First Wake-Robin of the Season”

“First Wake-Robin of the Season”

“We are living a life full of first experiences, from a first kiss, to the first time giving blood, to conceptual and philosophical explanations of humanity’s firsts.”
― Kat Lahr

I should call this series of photographs “Firsts”, since most of my recent posts have been of the first blossoms of local wildflowers. It’s been a bit of a strange season, with a few vigorous specimens blooming a few days ahead of their neighbouring companions.

That has made me wonder why those few are so much more advanced. It’s not anything obvious like more sunlight, less competition, or better soil that seems to be the cause. Though I do enjoy the isolation of the single blossoms, as they are not drowned out by a large bloom. Perhaps that’s why I’ve been so drawn to creating my studio images of flowers in isolation. It allows the viewer to focus on the details of the individual flower.

This Wake Robin, or red trillium, as it is commonly know here, was a single blossom surrounded by a large patch of Wild Ginger, which I intend to return to, since it is also about to bloom. The lighting was a bit harsher and more direct than I had wanted, despite being in a fairly dense forest glade. The bright lighting actually enhanced the petals, giving them an almost metallic appearance. There were many more plants close to blooming. I figure they will be in full show in the next day or two, if temperatures remain as mild as they have been the past few days.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/40 sec, f/32.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Hepatica”

“Hepatica”

“Oh, the joy, the joy of Spring, a joy so grand, so absolute, so lavish and engaging, dipping my humble soul in magic, uplifting and exhilarating, instilling beauty and virtue into my days.”
― Amelia Dashwood

Here’s another one of my region’s ‘early bloomers’, Hepatica or Sharp Lobed Liver-Leaf. It seems to manage well in the cool spring temperatures because of the long hairs on the stem. As you may be able to see from this image, the leaves are just starting to develop.

I had an interesting conversation yesterday with my mother-in-law who’s approaching her 90th birthday and grew up in this area. She told me they called these May Flowers and that they were plentiful and sought after by the young girls for bouquets because of their long stems. And, of course, they were one of the first blooming flowers available in the spring.

These are quite a bit ahead this year and are just a few days ahead of their companion trout lilies, trilliums, and wild ginger, though I did spot an early Wake-Robin, which I will post tomorrow.

I had to shot at a slightly higher ISO than I prefer, since there was a bit of a breeze in the forest, forcing me into a higher shutter speed.

Can you tell, I love spring flowers?

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/100 sec, f/40.0 ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Trailside Periwinkle”

“Trailside Periwinkle”“It’s an odd thing, happiness. Some people take happiness from gold. Or black pearls. And some of us, far more fortunate, take their happiness from periwinkles.”
– Patricia A. McKillip

While hiking into the forest this past weekend, I came across a patch of periwinkle, still green even after the winter snows, though showing some wear. As I looked closer, I noticed a few blossoms had already opened. That’s a bit earlier than previous years. Though only a few blossoms where open, you can see plenty of buds waiting to open in the next few days.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/36.0 ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Blue Cohosh Buds and Flowers”

“Think of all the beauty still left around you and be happy.”
― Anne Frank

A few days a ago I went to a large grove of these early spring bloomers for a few more shots of the unusual tiny purple flowers. This particular grove contains thousands of these plants and the forest floor almost looks burnt with the density of Cohosh growing here, interspersed with freshly emerging trillium and wild leeks.

I had no idea just how complex the structures were until I started shooting them with my 90 mm macro lens and can’t seem to get enough of them.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/50 sec, f/11.0 ISO 100

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“European Butterbur”

“Northern Sweet Coltsfoot”

“The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.”
― Marcel Proust

I found this interesting plant last year, growing in an isolated patch. There are no other instances of this plant in the area, so I’m wondering if it hitchhiked to its current location. It’s a beautiful but strange-looking plant. Like the common yellow coltsfoot which grows in the same area, it blooms before putting out leaves, though the one I photographed is showing a full leaf, just developed and another emerging from the ground.

The biggest joy for me, when exploring the paths and riverways around my home is discovering these little gems and getting to understand the incredible diversity of plants and wildlife in an area that many would consider mundane, even boring, from a photographer’s point of view.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/8 sec, f/32.0 ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“First Trout Lily of the Season”

“First Trout Lily of the Season”

“Life is a first impression. You get one shot at it. Make it everlasting.”
― J.R. Rim

Another ‘first’ flower. This one was completely unexpected, which makes it all the more special. I had set out to make some more photos of the newly emerged bloodroot, which went quite well, despite wind gusts that interfered in my making the exposures as long as I prefer.

As I finished photographing a nice cluster of bloodroot, I noticed a small flash of yellow in my periphery. It turned out to be an early blooming Trout Lily. In fact, a very early trout lily. I was not expecting to see them for at least another week or so and this one is far more advanced than any of its neighbouring plants, which have just started to leaf out. Why it’s so far ahead will remain a mystery. Perhaps all the condition were just right and that small plot of soil got a bit more heat from the sun than the rest of the forest?

There was one more plant just starting to bud a few feet away but these two were the exception. I have a real fondness for trout lily, with their mottled leaves and delicate nodding yellow flowers.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/80 sec, f/20.0 ISO 320

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com