Category Archives: Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors | July 13, 2017

“Private Parking”

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Private Parking – Bath Ontario”

This door caught my attention, as do the many unusual doors I pass on a daily basis. This one struck me as funny. The door is the entrance to what looks to have been a small residence or business at one point. It’s now a storage shed, completely full of junk.

I am often left wondering at the stories doors can tell. At some point in time, somebody took the time to make a fairly unique door, or they purchased a unique door and made it fit the door frame. What made me grin is the fact that this ‘junk shed’ is posted as “Private Parking”. Though the building is along the Main Street of Bath, Ontario, a small town of some two thousand residents in south-east Ontario, it is unlikely that parking will be at a premium or that anybody in the near future will be parking there.

The reason I ended up in Bath, a town with Loyalist roots dating back to the late seventeen hundreds, and was the recent  Tall Ships Regatta (see my previous posts few if you like old sailing vessels). The town was, at one point, a major port and trading centre, till roads and railways bypassed the town, taking commerce with them. It now has a small dock and sheltered harbour, making it the ideal venue for the sailing ships to anchor.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 200 mm
1/200 sec, f/7.1 ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Thursday Doors | July 06, 2017

“Belanger House Doors - Royal Ontario Museum”

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Belanger House Doors – Royal Ontario Museum”

This is yet another museum door. Not a door to a museum, but a door ‘within’ a museum. I shared another one a few weeks ago. The Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto has a section devoted to Canada and included in that collection are several doors of historical significance.

This door came from Belanger House and dates back to the early 18th century. The house itself was situated outside the Quebec village of Saint-Jean-Port-Joli, on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River. The town itself is now well known for its wood carvers and it would appear that has been the case for several centuries now.

This door highlights the elaborate woodwork that adorned the main room or common room. The museum acquired the entire room around 1931 through ethnologist Marius Barbeau. The museum has two of the four walls on display. In addition to the wall panels they also have three doors, four windows, a fireplace opening, three cupboards, three boxed ceiling beams and three fluted columns.

As I mentioned in my previous post about this display, it shows that doors play an important part in our history and it’s good to see that someone had the foresight to preserve them for all to admire and enjoy.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/13sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 100

Thursday Doors | June 29, 2017

“Zaragoza 20 - San Jose del Cabo”

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Zaragoza 20 – San Jose del Cabo”

These weather worn doors are the entrance to La Panga Antigua, a restaurant in the Art District of San Jose del Cabo in Baja California, Mexico. See here for what lies behind these ‘rustic’ doors. You’ll be surprised. I was and now will have to return to sample the interior. I’m also including a Streetview link so you have some context of the neighbourhood.

When I made the image I was simply intrigued by the chunk of wood suspended above the door. It just seemed odd and out of place. Now, as I look up the address and the name of the establishment, it all makes sense, sort of. A Panga, modern derivation traditional dugout fishing boat. Generally, if you say panga, it’s simply interpreted as ‘boat’.

Now it makes sense, La Panga Antigua means “the old boat” and the chunk of wood is actually a piece of an old wooden dugout. Anyways, that mystery is now solved and I can reflect back on the numerous interesting and unique doors in this area of San Jose del Cabo, the Art District. Each vendor trying to differentiate themselves from others, often through the use of doors.

Nikon D800
AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G IF- @ 112mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6 ISO 200

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Thursday Doors | June 22, 2017

“322 Dundas Street West” - Toronto

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“322 Dundas Street West” – Toronto

In this image, it’s the doorway, not so much the doors that draw my attention. Along this stretch of Toronto heritage buildings, and across from the Art Gallery of Ontario, this one really stands out, with its fuchsia columns and yellow brick. I had to go through my media library to verify I had not posted it previously and it turns out that I have not.

I found that odd, that I have not yet posted an image of doors that I have enjoyed for several years. As it turns out, my oldest daughter’s friend lived here for a few years. It is a small world.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/300 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 80

Thursday Doors | June 15, 2017

Beverly House Doors - Royal Ontario Museum

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Beverly House Doors” – Royal Ontario Museum

Doors in a museum? Imagine my surprise.

On a visit to the Royal Ontario Museum a few months back, I entered a section of the museum tucked away from most of the traffic and discovered an entire section dedicated to the history of Canada. Why was I not previously aware of this?

Among this collection, I was surprised to see several historic doors on display. This was quite a surprise, that someone cared enough about doors to preserve them.

The above door , circa 1822, belonged to Beverly House, the residence of Sir John Beverley Robinson (1791 -1863), Chief Justice of Upper Canada, was one of the most impressive residences in early Toronto. It was located at the northeast corner of John and Richmond Streets. Robinson, the son of a Loyalist from Virginia, was one of the most powerful men in Ontario in his time. The house was demolished around 1913.

The door was a gift to the museum from the Ursuline Religious of the Chatham Union in Toronto.

Thank goodness someone had the foresight to preserve this door for generations to enjoy.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/7 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 80

 

Thursday Doors | June 08, 2017

"Abandoned"

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Abandoned”

This image is a far departure from my usual images of stately, ornate doors, yet they are still doors and I found them quite intriguing.

As I was out hiking earlier this year, I came across an abandoned maple sap evaporator, sitting in the middle of a mature forest. It seemed so out-of-place that I had to make a photo of it to show to friends and thought Thursday Doors might be another place to share it.

For those unfamiliar with maple syrup production, the ‘sap’, which is a sweet, watery liquid produced by Sugar Maple trees, is gathered, either in buckets attached to the trees or, for more modern facilities, via a ‘pipeline’ of plastic hoses, and boiled down in an ‘evaporator’, like this one (but not full of holes). A large fire is kept going under the evaporator to boil off most of the water in the maple sap. The remaining syrup, is then further boiled in a smaller finishing tank. At the end of the process, the maple syrup, is about 1/40th the volume of the original sap. So, it takes a lot of sap to produce even a small amount of syrup. This boiling process occurs late February to early March, just as days begin to warm and the sap rises into the tree, which requires cold nights and days above freezing. The cycle usually runs for just over a week.

So, I look at this image and can imagine someone, in days gone by, harvesting the sap and boiling it here in the forest. The tank would likely have been covered or enclosed in a large ‘sugar shack’ to protect the producer from the elements and keep foreign matter from surrounding trees from falling into the evaporator.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/50 sec, f/10.0 ISO 200

or more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Thursday Doors | May 25, 2017

“Royal Ontario Museum - Events Entrance”

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Royal Ontario Museum – Events Entrance”

Today, A return to the east side, and the former main entrance of the Royal Ontario, or ROM, as it is known locally. This image was made at the same time as my previous ROM door image back in March. These doors, are a closer view of the right hand door of the three sets of doors that make up this entrance. This image shows off a bit more of the beautiful carving above the door. On further inspection, which was not possible from the wider image, the iron florets  and handles are also very interesting and it would appear that the right handle door handle was broken and repaired at one time.

As the sign says, the doors are used for, or were at one time used for special events, though I can’t recall ever seeing anyone use them.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/120 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 32

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com