“Lily of the Valley – Convallaria majalis”

“Lily of the Valley - Convallaria majalis”

“I miss your fragrance, sometimes I miss it this much that I can clearly smell you in the air.” 
― Qaisar Iqbal Janjua

Just in time for the last day of May. This has been a very delayed year for many of our spring flowers, here in Ontario. These just started blooming last week and I was happy to see a few remained for me to photograph.

The fragrance of lily of the valley is among my favourite scents and the memory of that smell brings back so many special times for me: gardening as a child, with my grandmother and father, my wedding day (we had lilacs and lily of the valley from our home and my wife’s family home as our flower arrangements and in the bouquet), as well as the birth of our first child, in May, 26 years ago. Lily of the valley and its wonderful sweetness was part of all those moments. I do miss it, when it’s not blooming, but the memory remains.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
3.0sec, f/29.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

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“The Greening”

“The Greening”

“Time moves forward don’t live backwards” 
― E’yen A. Gardner

Spring, that time of year when the Earth groans and stretches after a winter slumber. Freshness is everywhere and the forest is transformed as branches begin to fill with fresh green leaves. Buds open and expand their contents to the sun, reaching for nourishment.

This ‘greening’ only seems to last a few days and the forest is a soft canvas of greens and yellows and every shade between. It’s a few days of completed freshness, before the insects begin feasting and the sun slowly dries and bleaches the colours. Many of the leaves, like these, will darken more as chlorophyll fills the cells. But for now, for this brief time, I will revel in the soft ‘greening’ of spring.

It’s a reminder to me, as the quote states, that life and time move forward, without exception, as the cycle continues toward summer, never the same, always new and slightly different.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/1000 sec, f/7.1, ISO 400 

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Marble Lake Columbine”

“Marble Lake Columbine”

“Even the tiniest of flowers can have the toughest roots.” 
― Shannon Mullen

Wildflowers constantly amaze me, in their endless forms and the environments they thrive it.

The columbine above, is a native to Ontario and this particular plant was growing from a thin crack in the bedrock. I suppose there was just enough organic mater accumulated in that crack to create the rich soil the columbine prefers and a seed from nearby pants happened to land in just the right place. It’s surprising that such a seemingly delicate plant can thrive in the northern wilderness, in a region where there was still frost in the forest when I made this image.

My biggest challenge in creating this image, as with most macro images, is trying to get a shot between the breezes that kept moving the flower back and forth. Even slight movement makes the shot blurry.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/40sec, f/7.1, ISO 400 

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Star of Bethlehem – 2018”

“Star of Bethlehem -2018”

“If only these treasures were not so fragile as they are precious and beautiful.” 
― Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

I find myself surveying my gardens, as the cycle of spring takes a firm hold. Tulips and daffodils are now dried remnants, these once beautiful ‘first’ colours. They welcomed the first few mild days with their bright faces and filled our sense of smell with their sweet fragrance.

Now, the next wave of flowers fills these spaces. Among them, Star of Bethlehem, with its delicate white blossoms. This is one of many plants retrieved from my mother-in-law’s gardens when she moved out of her house a few years ago. We really had no idea what we were bringing home, only that her plants were a very essential part of her and we welcomed them to our gardens.

Since then, every spring, a new mystery blossom would surface and wait to be identified. This plant was among them and is a very lovely addition to our flower beds.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1.6 sec, f/40.0, ISO 400 

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Cody at the Lake”

“Dogs are our link to paradise. They don’t know evil or jealousy or discontent. To sit with a dog on a hillside on a glorious afternoon is to be back in Eden, where doing nothing was not boring–it was peace.”
― Milan Kundera

This is a more personal image for me. It’s an image of our dog, Cody, as he stands at the edge of Marble Lake, where we camp. We picked him up as a rescue some ten years ago and he has been a part of our lives ever since.

I simply love this pose and happened to have my camera with me at that moment to capture this pose. I did use a plug-in to get the painterly effect, which just seems to work on this particular image. It reminds me of the paintings of English hunting dogs.

Though Cody has been limited to hunting the squirrels in our back yard, I still like to picture him this way. He looks quite majestic and is in his element. Though he is starting to show signs of his age, he’s still amazingly active and a pleasure to have around, always wanting attention, and of course, his meals 🙂

“Spring Fire”

“Keep a little fire burning; however small, however hidden.”

― Cormac McCarthy

It’s not often that I revisit a subject, especially a flower. However, I felt this one needed to be viewed a bit closer in a slightly different composition. So, here it is. The slightly different angle even changed the title for me. I see more of the ‘fire’ in this lovely tulip than I had before.

I find it interesting what even a slight shift in vantage point an do to things. In fact, I think I prefer this composition more than my previous version from a few days ago. There seems to be more energy and depth in this version and the light seems to play off the foliage a bit more.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
3 sec, f/29.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Purple Tulip”

“Purple Tulip”

“There is no greatness where there is not simplicity, goodness, and truth.” 
― Leo Tolstoy

As the world becomes more complex, on a seemingly daily basis, I find myself drawn to simplicity.

Even the title of the image, while quite simple, suffices. This is a single blossom from a larger bouquet and a found myself liking the isolated flower more than the whole arrangement

I enjoy spending time with the subjects of my photos, often moving around them and finding the angle and light most pleasing to me. I may be breaking some composition rule, but if it resonates with me then, hopefully, somebody else sees it for its beauty as well.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm

3 sec, f/29.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com