Tag Archives: abstract

“Green Haze”

“Sometimes life is hard … so we have to squeeze it, touch it, play with it, and make it soft like a dough! Now it’s soft enough to be shaped in any way we want! Keep moving, touching life, as this will keep it smooth and fun!”

― Karina Fonseca Azevedo

This photo as sat in my draft folder for many months. I made it with my iPhone, as I hiked a favourite trail with my wife and daughters. I’m not sure what it is about this image that has kept it ‘on hold’ for so long.

I was experimenting with long exposure with my iPhone, seeing if I could recreate the abstracts that I make with my main camera. The resulting image is a bit softer, without the saturation I get with my Nikon, bit the image is still pleasing and effective. The real trick to achieve the effect I enjoy so much is in the movement of the camera itself. Basic settings remain the same, but the ‘feel’ of the pan or vertical ‘sweep’ that I use is different. With more practice I could probably get close.

iPhone 7

Advertisements

“York River Reflections”

“York River Reflections”

“Abstraction allows man to see with his mind what he cannot see physically with his eyes….Abstract art enables the artist to perceive beyond the tangible, to extract the infinite out of the finite. It is the emancipation of the mind. It is an exploration into unknown areas.”
― Arshile Gorky

This is where is started, my fascination with photo abstractions. Back in March 0f 2012, I was hiking the shores of the York River, near Bancroft, Ontario when I noticed a beautiful reflection on the slightly rippled river surface. I made a few images and was pleased with the outcome. Then, I did something different: I cropped hem to remove the shoreline and flipped the image upside down, producing this beautiful ‘painterly’ abstract of the trees on the far shore. The slight flash of orange near the centre of the photo was an interesting and unexpected bonus.

A close friend of mine commented that it looked like a painting and I ran with that, making my first 24 x 36 canvas print, and yes, it did look like a painting then. It sold quickly and I’m considering reprinting it, larger, for my office wall, since it really has been a pivotal piece for me.

I’m thinking this may serve as the model for my next attempt at painting. Stay tuned.

Nikon D200
Tamron 17-50 mm f/2.8 @ 50mm
1/100 sec, f/4.5, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“The Light from Within”

“The Light from Within”

Why we love with close hearts
Why we love with souls apart
Let the love flow from hearts to souls,
Let the world glow”
― Megha Khare

For the past few years I have found great pleasure in creating these photo abstractions, all done in camera, no Photoshop blur effects.

Several years ago, I was introduced to this technique by a photographer friend who did these for a brief period. She was kind enough to give me some pointers and I took that technique and personalized it. Since I make these images free-standing, each image is slightly different and unique. I usually make three or four and decide on which I like best. I always have a vision in mind but they are always a surprise. The light plays in such unique ways that it is hard to fully predict the outcome, though I have gotten better , I think, in my initial composition.

The image above was made as I was on the inner edge of a pine forest. The sun was shining brightly on the maples and birches just outside, creating this gorgeous glow, which reflected onto the forest floor. Many of the details are missed in the viewfinder, like the green grasses in the foreground and the solitary green leaf, glowing in front of the pines.

The forest, though seemingly dark, is alight with this reflected glow which seems to come from the ground itself, despite the cooling temperatures as we approach the inevitable winter time. You’d almost think it could melt the snow. I’m hoping for a few more days of this warm fall light.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 80 mm
1/4 sec, f/25.0, ISO 200

High resolution image can be viewed on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Papineau Creek Guardian”

Papineau Creek Guardian

“Solitary. But not in the sense of being alone. Not solitary in the way Thoreau was, for example, exiling himself in order to find out where he was; not solitary in the way Jonah was, praying for deliverance in the belly of the whale. Solitary in the sense of retreat. In the sense of not having to see himself, of not having to see himself being seen by anyone else.”
― Paul Auster

I have admitted before that I have a love of solitary trees. They stand alone, each with a story. They stand as silent witnesses to the world that moves around them, with no apparent support from their peers. I’m especially fond of trees that cling to the edge of water. The roots holding firm to land while being provided abundant water from below.

This beautiful red pine captivated me. The forest floor was littered with its needles, blocking off invading weeds. The creek seemed to bend towards it, just far enough to make contact with the roots. I know, the creek was there first and took advantage of the creek but that was the image my mind saw.

At this point in its course, Papineau creek has just come through a series of beautiful rapids and has slowed as it passes the pine. It’s a very serene image that I wanted to share here.

I came across this place in the fall a few years ago and returned this past weekend. It’s a very peaceful little park, with no signage leading you to it. I like to look at it as a private retreat, though I’m sure local residents know about it.

iPhone 5s back camera 4.15mm f/2.2
1/220 sec, f/2.2, ISO 32

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Algae Art” – Secord Pond, Uxbridge

“Algea Art” - Secord Pond, Uxbridge

“The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance.”
― Aristotle

Art is everywhere. Sometimes, in the most surprising places, and with unexpected elements. Case in point, this algal bloom on a local pond. It looks a bit like a satellite image of some tropical forest and smells just like a horse stable. In fact, I was wondering if the local trail riding association was having a meeting close by.

In any case, these wonderful layered patterns in various shades of glowing greens and dull brown were a sight to see and it would have been interesting to watch them form.The bloom was likely caused by the sudden heat up we had this past weekend and the waves and layers caused by winds blowing  from the east and forcing the progressive layers of the bloom into one end of the pond. It’s also quite thick but I had no desire to touch it to check consistency.

And that, is why I enjoy nature so much; there is always something new to see and discover that is beyond the imagination.

Nikon D800
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm
1/80 sec, f/4.5, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Spring Poplars on the Bend” – Stouffville

“Spring Poplars on the Bend”

“See that path in front of you? That path has been laid before you, the one that you’re supposed to take, the one you’re told to take through life…just like everyone else. If you follow that path, you’ll be following all the rules, you’ll always know that you did what everyone wanted you to do and you’ll make it through…
See that path in front of you? I dare you to step off and make your own.”
― Travis Culliton

Looking out my home office window yesterday, as the dark clouds cleared and the sky brightened, I could not help but get outside for a few minutes to stretch my legs and get some fresh air. There is a nice trail system 5 minutes from home. So I took my camera to see what this day offered.

I’ve walked this path hundreds of times and there is always some slight variation in light, foliage, and viewpoint that makes each walk unique. I’ve also photographed these poplars on numerous occasions, including vertical pan shots like this.

However, this day, that slight play of light, new growth, and the bright green grass (including dandelions) made the element s align for this lovely spring image. It seems far too long since I’ve created one of these ‘painterly’ images, which I enjoy so much. Hopefully, this image of a bright spring day brightens someone else’s day.

Nikon D800
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Study in Wood #6” – Seaton Trail, Whitvale

“Study in Wood #6”

“The tree which moves some to tears of joy is in the eyes of others only a green thing that stands in the way. Some see nature all ridicule and deformity… and some scarce see nature at all. But to the eyes of the man of imagination, nature is imagination itself.”
― William Blake

I absolutely love the William Blake quote above. It goes beyond simply this image.

Number 6 in the series and growing. I keep coming across these gnarly old specimens, standing along the trails, or in city parks. I find myself staring at them, immersed in their story, while others pass them by as merely ‘stumps’. They all remind me of abstract paintings or deeply furrowed sculptures. Their lives recorded; marked out in intricate patterns, each unique.This particular tree had been recently stripped of its bark, revealing smooth undulating wood, with only tinges of moss taking hold.

Winter winds had embedded a few stray cedar and spruce needles in a hollow. I was not sure if I wanted to include them in this composition, but they are part of the image in front of me, so I decided to leave them in.

The smooth surface of this tree is so different from most trees I see. It reveals all the curves and bumps of a slow growing hardwood. Though the bark is gone, I expect it’s a member of the maple family. tree aficionados, feel free to help me on this one. By the end of summer, I expect this old fellow will be darkened with moss, it’s surface transforming from a solid, almost ivory-like texture to one mottled with mildew and softening as the decay process takes hold. Yet, here he is preserved as a photo for me to enjoy even when he’s gone back to the ground that birthed him, so many years ago.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 82 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com