Tag Archives: April

“April Revenant”

“April Revenant”

“The ghosts of winter cling stubbornly to thin branches, fluttering as bright reminders of days gone by.”
– Ed Lehming

As the days warm, the ghostly and diaphanous leaves of the beech begin to fade. Throughout the winter their brightness was a welcome respite from the cold, gray, and seemingly lifeless forest.

They have survived the winter winds, snow, and ice, though the season has clearly taken its toll. The leaves, once a bright coppery gold, are now thin, bleached, and ragged. Yet, as we await the freshness of spring, even these tatters provide a most welcome brightness to the otherwise drab forest.

This particular beech tree, with its now faded and ghostly leaves, stands before a tree which fell to the ground over the winter, evidenced by the bright, exposed wood on the stump. The limited sunlight played on the ground and the last remnants of snow lay in the shadows. It’s a snapshot which nicely captures a very brief moment in the forest. A scene which plays out for me year after year and also provides a real challenge in lighting, contrast, and composition to communicate the mood adequately.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/29.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Winter Hold Out”

“Winter Hold Out”

“I know it is difficult to believe in your own courage or fortitude when everything inside of you feels weak and shattered. But do not believe what you feel. You will not be easily broken.” 
― Rachel L. Schade

This has been a brutal start to spring. April, as you may have noticed from my lack of photos, has presented my with conditions that were just plain dangerous or miserable to be outdoors in.

We’ve had rain , and snow, and deep freezes. Just went the temperatures seems to be climbing, they would drop again and the world would turn a muddy gray. If found myself anxiously looking out the window, wondering of this might be the day to get out and explore.

The weather has also paid a toll on the forest vegetation. Plants that should be blooming now are not even emerged yet. And others, surprisingly, are earlier than I would have expected. Yet, that is the nature of nature, always finding ways of getting the cycle back on track. Today, I did find some surprises, which I will be posting later in the week.

Yet, the first item that caught my eye today was this  fluffy seed pod, which, despite a vast 3 day ice storm, two weeks ago, has managed to hold onto its seeds and the fluff is nicely drying, preparing to deliver the seeds to the surrounding forest floor, just as it thaws out. It amazed me how this survived, without being broken off by the elements, which seem to have flattened everything else around them.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm

1/250 sec, f/8.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Monochrome Mondays

“April Oak and Moon”

“I saw it written and I saw it say
Pink moon is on its way
And none of you stand so tall
Pink Moon gonna get you all”
― Nick Drake

“April Oak and Moon”

While not a full Pink Moon (first full moon of April), I just had to stop and make this photo. The old oak, is probably the most photographed tree in the area. Its unique position on a hilltop and easy access by road makes it one of those iconic locations that begs for a photograph.

I decided to try it as a mono shot today, and I think it works. But just in case, here’s teh colour version to compare.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 70 mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Spring’s First Daffodils” – Niagara-on-the Lake

“Spring’s First Daffodils”  -Niagara-on-the-Lake

“I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills
When all at once I saw a crowd
A host of golden daffodils
Beside the lake beneath the trees
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.”
― William Wordsworth

At long last, I feel I might be able to say that spring and warmer weather are here to stay? I’ve posted about ‘false starts‘ and the change of seasons, the endless repeating cycles, yet consistent warm days elude me. This image was made nearly two weeks ago, a mere 50 kilometers south of my home, yet my own daffodils are reluctant to bloom.

Daffodils, like peonies, are one of those marvelous plants that keep spreading every year. I often see large patches and imagine them being planted many years ago and just spreading out, covering larger areas over time.

Judging the forecast and their current state, I’d say they will open in the next day and it ‘should’ be warmer every day next week. Here’s hoping.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 98 mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Morning Light at Burleigh Falls”

“Morning Light at Burleigh Falls”

“Water that never moves.” I say to him. “It’s fine for a little while. You can drink from it and it’ll sustain you. But if it sits too long it goes bad. It grows stale. It becomes toxic.” I shake my head. “I need waves. I need waterfalls. I want rushing currents.”
— Tahereh Mafi

I’ve always enjoyed moving water and photographing it. I gain energy from it, as the quote above says so well, still water is fine for a while, but eventually it stagnates. Like the water, though it’s tempting to live in the calm, life is about movement and change, wheather by choice or circumstance.

Earlier this week I saw a Facebook post from a fellow photographer who had visited this beautiful chute mid week. I was astounded, looking at the posted photo, by the sheer volume of water rushing through the channel between Stoney Lake and Lower Buckhorn Lake in central Ontario’s Kawartha Region. We did not have much snow this past winter but despite this, the waters of the feeder lakes had overwhelmed the control dam above the Falls.

Needless to say, I had to check it out myself, on my way to Bancroft, where I show my photographs at a artist co-op called A Place for the Arts.

I arrived at the falls around 9:15 am and the light for the east was stunning, lighting up the water and the opposite shore. I took some time and made a few photos, with the intention of returning late afternoon, on my way back home. The image above is from my morning visit and I’ll post a few more at a later date from my afternoon stop, which was equally impressive.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm
1/10 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“April Icicles over Duffins Creek”

“April Icicles over Duffins Creek”

“Whenever there is stillness there is the still small voice, God’s speaking from the whirlwind, nature’s old song, and dance…”
― Annie Dillard

Chilly water flows beneath icicles formed by the spray of the creek below. I found this to be an odd sight. April in my area has been ‘confusing’. We had beautiful sunshine and mild temperatures, followed by a deep freeze, snow, freezing rain, and strong winds, all within a few days. This has made it difficult to get out and enjoy the outdoors.

This small chute is located just below the Whitevale dam, north of Pickering, Ontario. It has become a fairly regular destination for me over the past few years. Primarily because I’m drawn to moving water and the serenity I find there, even as the water surges and churns over the rocks below the dam. It’s here that I make many of my winter photos of water flowing beneath the ice, or frozen in great icicles at the dam itself.

In this case, I found a lovely composition created by the tight combination of mist and air temperature. The moderately cold night had created conditions whereby spray from the water had splashed onto an overhanging branch and slowly frozen into these delicate icicle.  There was no wind, which provided me an opportunity to do a long exposure, which showed off the icicles and allowed me to put the water in the background into motion, as contrast between stillness and movement. Very much how I feel when I’m at the waterside.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 135 mm
1/10 sec, f/20.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com