Tag Archives: Apsley

“Unburdened”

“Unburdened”

“These rocks are too heavy, can’t carry them any more,
don’t know why I ever picked them up before,
going to have to put them down where they don’t belong,
’cause I can’t get them back to where they came from.

These rocks belong to no one, except history.
Somewhere between the desert and the rolling sea,
or maybe up in the mountains blue and tall,
I picked them but now I’m going to let them fall.”
― Jay Woodman

This is one of those images that just created all sorts of thoughts for me. It’s not a typical shot for me, but the arrangement fascinated me at the time.

Along the shore of the Crowe River, near Apsley, Ontario, the river, which is really a large creek, dropped off its spring cargo of boulders. The river starts out at Paudash Lake, some 15 miles north. However, the Crowe is mainly a ‘meander’, meaning it snakes its way slowly through the surrounding countryside. So, how far from the source this point, just above “The Gut” is would be a guess.

What struck me is the size of these boulders (the small one in the centre is about bowling ball sized) and how a generally lazy river could move these. That got me wondering further on where they came from and how far they had travelled. At some point in the spring there must have been a substantial current and these boulders have had quite a journey to round and smooth them as much as they have been. Yet, at some point in the spring runoff, the force of water was no longer sufficient to move them any further and he river unburdened itself, till the cycle repeats next spring.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 180 mm
1/60sec, f/2.8, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“The Gut – Revisited”

"The Gut - Revisited"

“To my mind, a picture should be something pleasant, cheerful, and pretty, yes pretty! There are too many unpleasant things in life as it is without creating still more of them.”
― Pierre-Auguste Renoir

I’ve contemplated this image many times. The original photo was very dark. I was trying to capture this beautiful gorge, aptly named “The Gut“, near Apsley, Ontario this past summer. It’s a very challenging photo due to dark shadows caused by the deep canyon walls to the left and the intensely bright cliff walls on the right. Yet my eyes saw this beautiful verdant passageway and all its colours as one evenly lit image.

There’s the problem we often face as photographers. Our eyes see something and the camera is just not as versatile as our eyes and brain in interpreting the image. That’s a reason I’m quite clear in stating that my photos depict ‘how’ I saw it. A person standing with me might not see it the same. Different eyes, different brain.

The joy in owning my Nikon D300, even though it’s a few years older, is that the image sensor is able to pull so much detail out of the shadows, with very little noise, when I edit the RAW image. I spent a bit of time dodging and burning the image, trying to balance out the light, yet even then, the image was not quite close to my vision.

I pulled the image into my Topaz Impression plug-in and rendered the image as an Impasto painting, with no further adjustments and, Voila! I had an image that did justice to what I saw that day. I don’t see this as cheating, rather, it’s a way for me to communicate my personal experience in a way that others might appreciate it.

The final image above shows all the richness of the forest, the glow of the afternoon sun on the cliff face and the movement and shimmer of the river, as it winds its way through the gorge. Very close to how I saw it, that wonderful hot afternoon in July.

Nikon D300
Tamron 17-50 mm f/2.8 @ 17 mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“The Gut Falls” – Apsley, Ontario

“The Gut Falls” - Apsley, Ontario

“Light can be both friend and foe, too much or too little and the full story is not told, overexposed or unseen, parts are missing. Balance, deliberate balance of light, is the way to see the true scene. Our eyes are designed to create that balance, humans are created for balance, and I try to imitate that through my images. – Ed Lehming

Still on the topic of ‘The Gut” Conservation area, near Apsley, Ontario. I had to revisit this waterfall, through a slightly different image. This one is a bit wider than the previous post and shows the flow of the water much better, in my opinion. I arrived at the falls at about 4:30pm. The light was still very direct and I was concerned about getting balanced image, especially since I wanted to do some long exposures. I shot this in RAW format, as I do with all my photos and kept it slightly underexposed, knowing that I could compensate for that when I processed the image.

I was quite happy at how it turned out, retaining the details and showing off the patchy, forest filtered light, without it being a distraction, and I was still able to get a bit of ‘shimmer’ from the moving water, rather than it simply being soft and milky. I believe the image captures the energy and movement as I saw it, which is my goal.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/10 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Down the Gut” – Apsley, Ontario

“Down the Gut” - Apsley, Ontario

“The whole point of getting engrossed in something that interests you, is that you dissolve into it, the more the intensity…the more you become vapour – you dissolve. In fact, there is no you to judge, to see… only emptiness within, that is the whole purpose of life… at least my life!”
― Ramana Pemmaraju

Above, is another photo of “The Gut”, a location mentioned in an earlier post. This time, looking away from the falls and down the “Gut” itself. What was difficult to capture, in this extremely challenging light, is the height of this fissure, through which the Crowe River flows. Thirty meter high walls compress the river as it flows between the sheer rock walls. It would be a sight to behold in the spring runoff. Right now, we’re in a drought and the water levels are extremely low, which allowed me to access this vantage point, which would normally be submerged. I didn’t venture further in, as the rocks were wet and slippery.

What light was available, from this vantage point, created a wonderful ‘glow’ on the canyon walls, showing the jagged rock edges covered with patches of moss and ferns in the damp environment created by this formation. It was a bright, hot July day that found me here, yet the flow of the water, the mist from the falls behind me, and the shade offered here was refreshing.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Falls at “The Gut” – Apsley, Ontario

Falls at “The Gut” - Apsley, Ontario

“There is a hidden message in every waterfall. It says, if you are flexible, falling will not hurt you!”
― Mehmet Murat ildan

As many of you who follow my blog might know, I love moving water and waterfalls. A few years ago, I set out to discover and document the many waterfalls and cascades in the area where I camp.

My journeys have taken me down some long, little travelled trails, across private property (which took some negotiating), and right next to major roadways. Hours have been spent enjoying the flow of water, relaxing on the shore after some strenuous hikes, and just taking in the raw beauty which is Ontario’s backcountry.

About a year ago, I shared this documentary journey with a friend of mine who also likes waterfalls and he asked me if I had visited “The Gut” yet. That surprised me. I had never heard of “The Gut”. He suggested I look it up and pay a visit.

Yesterday, I did just that. I Googled it and found out a bit more about it. The name intrigued me, as well as photos others had posted. So, on my way home from my camper I set out to find this place, relying on roadside signage to guide me.

I came across a sign on the highway that pointed to “The Gut” and it indicated that my destination was 14 km away. This turned out to be 14 km of hilly, winding, dirt road, with no further signs to indicate my progress. Finally, at the top of a particularly steep hill, another sign indicated that I had arrived.

After parking the car my wife and I proceeded down a trail marked “The Gut Falls”.It was a short, steep hike but we found our final destination, a heavy fence installed to keep distracted hikers from falling into the Gut, a fissure in the local basalt lava rock, some 30 meters high and between 5 to 10 meters across. The Crowe Rivers flows through this steep walled feature, beginning with the waterfall pictured above. I have several other photos which I will post over the next few days.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/10 sec, f/32.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com