Tag Archives: architecture

Thursday Doors | August 17, 2017

“582 Sherbourne Street” James Copper House, Toronto

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors. 

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“582 Sherbourne Street” James Cooper House, Toronto

Today, a return to another of the grand old houses of Toronto’s Sherbourne Street. This one has fascinated me for some time now. Whenever I drive by, I’m drawn to the interesting statues installed on the property. So, when I had the opportunity to walk the area a few weeks ago, this was definitely on my list of places to check out.

I had no idea of the history of this majestic “Second Empire” style building. The building was built in 1881 for James Cooper, a wealthy merchant and show retailer. This area was one of the wealthiest places in Toronto at the time the house was built and it’s in the best condition. After Cooper departed, the building became home to the Keeley Institute for Nervous Diseases, an organization assisting those with alcohol and substance abuse problems. In 1910, it became home to the Toronto Knights of Columbus, who used the facility as a meeting and fundraising venue for almost a century. In 2008 the property was purchased by the Tridel Group, with the intention of building a condominium tower on the site, which is designated by the City of Toronto as a heritage building, so it had to be preserved. Or, in this case, moved.

It turns out, it’s also one of the heaviest moves of a building in Canadian history. In 2008, the 800 ton building was moved twenty feet east and five feet south from its original location, to make room for a condominium tower being built on the same property. The move cost the developer a reported $1M but preserved an architectural treasure from Toronto’s past. The developer has taken great care to maintain the house, which serves as an amenities centre for the adjacent condominium tower.

Oh, yes, and back to the statues, the property has several, all in a wildlife motif, with wolves, stags, and foxes attached to metal bases, with a reflected statue beneath it. The wolf and the fox sit horizontal, but the stag is a vertical installation, quite eye catching. I’ve included the Google Streetview link, though it does not do it justice, as well as an image of the house being moved.

The things you learn when you look for nice doors.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/120 sec; f/1.8; ISO 32

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Thursday Doors | May 25, 2017

“Royal Ontario Museum - Events Entrance”

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Royal Ontario Museum – Events Entrance”

Today, A return to the east side, and the former main entrance of the Royal Ontario, or ROM, as it is known locally. This image was made at the same time as my previous ROM door image back in March. These doors, are a closer view of the right hand door of the three sets of doors that make up this entrance. This image shows off a bit more of the beautiful carving above the door. On further inspection, which was not possible from the wider image, the iron florets  and handles are also very interesting and it would appear that the right handle door handle was broken and repaired at one time.

As the sign says, the doors are used for, or were at one time used for special events, though I can’t recall ever seeing anyone use them.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/120 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 32

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

Thursday Doors – April 06, 2017

“Inatowycz Hall’ - Royal Conservatory of Music

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Ihnatowycz Hall’ – Royal Conservatory of Music

Not far from my past two door posts, stands this lovely door, the entrance to the Royal Conservatory of Music’s Ihnatowycz Hall, which contains the Mazzoneli Concert Hall, a beautiful, intimate 237 seat concert hall. Originally known as McMaster Hall, the building underwent significant renovations in 2005 with a donation from Mr. Ian Ihnatowycz and his wife, Dr. Marta Witer — both Royal Conservatory alumni and was renamed in their honour. It’s one of Toronto’s hidden architectural gems. To my understanding, the building originally housed McMaster University, which moved to Hamilton, Ontario. The Royal Conservatory of Music moved into the building in 1963.

It’s a bit tough to get a good image of the door in the summer, as Bloor Street is lined with fairly thick trees. Despite this, the building has always attracted me, with its bright brickwork and I thought it high time that I add this to my door collection.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/340 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“AGO Stairs in Mono”


This is perhaps the most photographed staircase in Toronto. The Douglas Fir clad stairs were designed by Frank Gehry as part of a major renovation of the Art Gallery of Ontario, known as the AGO and completed in 2008.

The curves, textures, and play of light are a photographer’s dream. I’ve made several images of the staircase, which extends up 5 stories and has 138 steps, but have never noticed this angle, which is shot from directly below the base. Had it not been for two small children looking up at it, I may have missed this opportunity. Ah, the eyes of children. They really do see things in the most wonderful ways.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/30 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 40

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

Thursday Doors – March 23, 2017

“Royal Ontario Museum - Front Doors”

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Royal Ontario Museum – Front Doors”

Today, something more local (I’ll return to Mexican doors soon).

The doors above are the old main entrance to the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, known locally as the ROM. I say old doors because these are the original front entrance to the museum. The main entrance has since been moved to the extremely modern ‘Crystal‘, which faces north, and is, in my opinion, ‘boring’. Don’t get me wrong, the architecture is very unique, but the doors do nothing to enhance it.

The old doors, facing east, are beautiful; embellished with wonderful stonework and carvings, the windows above inset with stained glass. I did not have my Nikon with me but was able to get a nice image of the doors and surrounding architecture with my iPhone. The light that morning was quite subdued but balanced. This image would be difficult to make mid day, all the features would be washed out, as you can see in the linked Streetview image.

When I made the image, this past Monday, I was very deliberate to take the time to really look at the door and its details. Despite that, I still missed many things, like the unique columns above the door and the wonderful scrollwork at the very top. So much so, that I cropped it as I made the photo. Though, it is quite grand and hard to fit in the frame. I did, however, notice the bright blue banners to either side, which looked like the sky and framed the facade, isolating it beautifully and giving it the appearance of standing alone.

In considering the image further, I realized that these doors are no longer used, except as an emergency exit, which is a bit sad.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/120 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 32

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

 

Thursday Doors – January 26, 2017

West Doors - St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Toronto

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

West Doors of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Toronto, Canada

Another view of this downtown Toronto church. I posted a photo of the front doors last week. A habit I have been in for some time now is to walk around the structure. WHile the front doors are grand and beautiful, many historical buildings have very interesting side and back doors. They tend to be a bit more ‘distressed’ than their welcoming counterparts, but this also makes them very interesting.

I do find it interesting though, that alternate doors (sorry, unintentional humour here), are not very well maintained. Less maintained may be the more correct expression here, as they are not, generally, in total disrepair. This west facing door is of the exact same design as the front doors, yet stonework is cracked and the door quite faded. I’m sure much is driven by budget decisions but, for me, it says a lot about priorities. I’m sure at one point, all the doors were equally important. After all, a lot of work went into the stunning stonework which frames the door itself. It just seems less important now. Just an impression.

Thursday Doors – January 19, 2017

St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Toronto

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

Front doors of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Toronto, Canada

I still find it odd, having lived just outside of Toronto most of my life, in Scarborough as a youngster, and just north of the city as an adult, that I have not fully explored the marvelous architecture (what remains of it) of Toronto more fully. I say, “what remains of it.” because, for an extended period, from the 60’s to 80’s ,Toronto had a policy of “Urban Renewal”, during which time, many wonderful historical buildings were torn down to make way for more modern buildings, and parking lots (because the people working in these buildings would have to park their somewhere). Back in the day, the car was the transport of choice. My how the city has changed on that front, for the better, though there is still an excess of cars, do to the poor rural/urban transit infrastructure. I could write at length on that evolution.

But, in honour of brevity, I’ll include a Google Streetview link, as I often do, so you can witness firsthand the extreme contrast between this grand old place of worship and the surrounding world of glass and steel.