Tag Archives: Bee

“Bee and Asters”

“Bee and Asters”

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/80 sec, f/4.5 ISO 100 

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“Incoming”

“Incoming”

“Sometimes opportunities float right past your nose. Work hard, apply yourself, and be ready. When an opportunity comes you can grab it.”
― Julie Andrews Edwards 

This was a fun scene to watch. There were initially two large bees, hastily gathering nectar from this bull thistle. As they busied themselves, a smaller bee approached closely, but when it saw the blossom full, darted off, yet kept coming back to check on the situation.

While I was snapping photos, one of the larger bees left, freeing up a large tract of real estate. As I continued to track the large bee, waiting for a good composition, the small bee darted in from the periphery, just as I hit the shutter release, yielding the action shot above.

The image makes me smile because I am so keenly aware that the small bee was so anxious to get its share of nectar and was probably relieved that one of its larger competitors had departed. Also, the slight blur of the smaller bee’s body gives a sense of speed and urgency to the image. The larger bee was so busy, it never even noticed the new arrival.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“The Ragweed Bee”

“The Ragweed Bee”

“Mindfulness is about love and loving life. When you cultivate this love, it gives you clarity and compassion for life, and your actions happen in accordance with that. “
– Jon Kabat-Zinn

It’s allergy double jeopardy, a bee on ragweed.

Strange, I used to have a real aversion to bees and wasps. Now that I am pursuing more macro images, I find myself surrounded by them, as I strain for that next ‘shot’.

That was the case a few days ago, as I was making images of a few Japanese beetles. I looked up and found myself in a dense patch of ragweed, filled with bees. And guess, what, the bees were not even vaguely interested in me, as they harvested the bounty of nectar from the plants around me. I had honeybees right next to my arm, and they cared not that I was there. We were simply occupying the same space, each with our own purpose.

It really was quite an experience for me; I never gave the bees a second thought, and I believe the feeling was mutual. This has opened up a whole new world for me. I find myself making more and more images of bees busily harvesting for the bounty of wild flowers. It is certainly not something I would have considered even a year ago. I suppose you could say I’m in my element. The thought of being stung does not cross my mind as I simply enjoy being a spectator in this activity. At this point, they could land on me and it would not bother me one bit. This really is living in the moment, and I love it. I am at peace. Oh ya, I’m also, supposedly, allergic to ragweed, go figure.

This simple image, of a bee, clinging to a ragweed blossom is so peaceful and enjoyable, having experienced that unexpected moment. It is a moment of time where I am simply ‘in it’ and fascinated by the processes of life and it’s simplicity. We all need more of these moments, so I thought I’d share it.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/800 sec, f/6.3 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Busy Bee”

“Busy Bee”

“Everyone is busy, yet we all have access to the same amount of time.” 
― Chris Guillebeau

The prevalent activity around here lately is bees and blooms. It’s so nice to see bees after a few years where bees, particularly honeybees, seemed to be quite scarce around here. I returned to my patch of Canada Thistle and simply stood for a while, watching all the activity, including the numerous species of pollinators.

From small to large, plump to thin, the bees, wasps, and various flies were busy collecting the bounty of nectar these wildflowers had to offer. It was not till I spent a few minutes standing there, observing, that I noticed the sweet smell emanating from the thistles. It’s something I had as yet been unaware of. As the fragrance drifted around me it is no small wonder that so many insects were drawn to this large patch.

Of all the harvesters, this mid sized bee is the one that caught my eye. Most bees and wasps would land on a blossom and spend quite a while going to each individual component flowerette and collecting the nectar. This bee, on the other hand, flitted from blossom to blossom, spending mere seconds on each. It truly was a busy bee. The image above represents a split second where it slowed long enough for me to capture a sharp image of it.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0 ISO 200

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Bee and Thistle”

“Bee and Thistle”

“Mindfulness is not the path of chasing. It is the path of beautification. When flowers blossom, the fragrance spreads, and the bees come.” 
― Amit Ray

I stood among this patch of Canada Thistle, enjoying the activity of bees, bugs, and beetles, noting just how much activity there was. One could stand for only a few minutes and see the incredible diversity of life drawn to a single species of flower in bloom. As I stood and scanned over the thousands of tiny blossoms, I could not help but be amazed at just how important this colony of thistles really is.

To many, this weed field would be a wild and unkempt eyesore, were it not for the tiny purple flowers. The thistles stand over a meter tall, shaggy and thorn covered, yet they provide sweet, life sustaining nectar to a multitude of insects. It was also nice to see so many species of bees, from honey bees, to carpenters, and bumble bees, each busily gathering nectar and distributing pollen.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0 ISO 200

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Thirst for Nectar”

“Thirst for Nectar”

“Mindfulness is not chasing the moment but sipping the nectar of the moment.”
― Amit Ray

I noticed an interesting trend in my last few images, colours seem to have progressed from whites to pinks. It’s pretty obvious when I review my media library. The colour shift through the seasons has captured my attention over the past few years. I’d say I’m becoming a lot more observant as I spend time really paying attention to my surroundings, that includes these colour patterns.

Despite my aversion to bees, and other stinging insects, I keep finding myself going back to the rhododendron, enjoying all the activity. Besides, the bees are far too busy gathering nectar to pay any attention to me.

If you look carefully, you will find a black ant in the shadows also participating in the feast. Though not shown in this image, some small snails were also enjoying the nectar as well.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/400 sec, f/10.0 ISO 100

or more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Bee and Rhododendron”

“Bee and Rhododendron”

“Bees do have a smell, you know, and if they don’t they should, for their feet are dusted with spices from a million flowers.”
― Ray Bradbury

I went out this morning to photograph my rhododendrons, which are now in full  bloom and was greeted by a hungry bee, who was busy flying from blossom to blossom, completely laden with pollen.

I’m usually a bit skittish around bees, yet having camera in hand seems to have turned that feeling off. I was fully engaged in making a few good images of the bee feeding. Of the entire series, this one appealed to me the most. I hope you enjoy it as well.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0 ISO 100

or more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com