Tag Archives: birds

“Tucked Away”

“Tucked Away”

“Every once in a while, people need to be in the presence of things that are really far away.”
― Ian Frazier

Just so that everyone does not get the impression that every shot I make turns out the way I want, here’s a tidbit from yesterday’s hike. It reminds my of the words often written on side-view mirrors: “Objects may appear closer than they are”.

In this case, a barred owl, resting among the tangled balsams. Just a bit too far for a ‘good’ shot. The kind of image that fills the frame with a beautiful ‘sharp‘ owl, every detail visible. Those opportunities do present themselves, infrequently, but often wildlife photographers are faced with this situation: the object of our attention is just too far away for us to realize the image we envision and would like. Sometimes, as in this case, closer access is not possible and a lens has its limits too. Not to mention the guy who claimed the only unobscured view to himself, for 30 minutes.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m always pleased to see wildlife, near or afar, and it is wonderful to see this sleeping owl, it’s something most people will never experience.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/60 sec, f/4.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Hairy Woodpecker”

“Hairy Woodpecker” - Secord Forest

“Birds know themselves not to be at the center of anything, but at the margins of everything. The end of the map. We only live where someone’s horizon sweeps someone else’s. We are only noticed on the edge of things; but on the edge of things, we notice much.”
― Gregory Maguire

At first, I thought this was a Downy Woodpecker, the most common species around here, but when I checked my bird books it looks more like this is a Hairy Woodpecker. They appear  very similar, except the Hairy Woodpecker has a longer beak. I’d appreciate a verification from my bird watching connections, since I use this blog as a learning tool as well.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/40 sec, f/3.2, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“Afternoon Nuthatch”

“Afternoon Nuthatch”

“December is full of the beauty of Light and love we can bring into our life.You can chose to be stressed or you can choose to let the small stuff go and be peaceful this Holiday season. It really is a choice you make.”
― Eileen Anglin

As I said earlier this week, it looks like I’ve gone to the birds. I’m pretty much a photo-opportunist and tend to move back and forth between subjects and styles from time to time, depending on what presents itself. Given the abundance of birds at our feeders lately, I simply could not help myself in documenting all the species present. The weekend started with Juncos and Cardinals. Today brought about Downy Woodpeckers and Nuthatches. As you can see, from all the tracks and shells around the dish, it’s been a busy place!

The nuthatches are curious birds and I seldom see them right side up. Usually i see them on my hikes, glancing at me while perched upside down on a tree trunk. It would appear that they will make exceptions if seeds are offered. This one, and her male companion (to be shared at a later date) kept coming back and gave many opportunities for nice images.

Birds, especially the small ones tend to be very skittish and move rapidly, often leaving me with a partially blurred image as they twitch and fidget. However, getting to just the right sunflower seed seems to slow them down a bit. So, despite the ‘dullish’ weather on this year’s winter solstice, a bit of brightness has graced my back deck and given me the enjoyment of watching our little friends flutter and feed.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 300mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Hawk!”

“If you are made for flight, intended for it,
you had better find a pursuer, fast.
Otherwise, all that fleeing is going nowhere.”
― Dan Chiasson

As I stood by the roadside, a large flock of birds suddenly lept to the air, spinning and weaving above the cornfield from which they had erupted. They flowed in the air like an apparition, then just as quickly, they descended and disappeared once more. All was still.

Then, within minutes, the pattern repeated, only this time, from the corner of my eye, i spotted the source of their flight, A Red-Tailed Hawk soared high above looking for some unwary prey. As soon as the hawk dropped behind the treeline, the birds settled back down till it’s next visit.

At the time, I did not know what variety of bird this was and assumed they were starlings, since starlings tend to form these groups, the larger ones being spectacular murmurations which seem to be some singular, living thing. As I looked closely at the photo, I noticed that these were in fact red-winged blackbirds. It’s the first time I’ve seen so many together. I suppose they are on their migration to warmer climes.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom
@ 140 mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3 ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com