Tag Archives: brick

Thursday Doors – April 06, 2017

“Inatowycz Hall’ - Royal Conservatory of Music

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Ihnatowycz Hall’ – Royal Conservatory of Music

Not far from my past two door posts, stands this lovely door, the entrance to the Royal Conservatory of Music’s Ihnatowycz Hall, which contains the Mazzoneli Concert Hall, a beautiful, intimate 237 seat concert hall. Originally known as McMaster Hall, the building underwent significant renovations in 2005 with a donation from Mr. Ian Ihnatowycz and his wife, Dr. Marta Witer — both Royal Conservatory alumni and was renamed in their honour. It’s one of Toronto’s hidden architectural gems. To my understanding, the building originally housed McMaster University, which moved to Hamilton, Ontario. The Royal Conservatory of Music moved into the building in 1963.

It’s a bit tough to get a good image of the door in the summer, as Bloor Street is lined with fairly thick trees. Despite this, the building has always attracted me, with its bright brickwork and I thought it high time that I add this to my door collection.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/340 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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Tuesdays of Texture – Week 13, 2017

“Eroded”“Eroded”

“In a decaying society, art, if it is truthful, must also reflect decay. And unless it wants to break faith with its social function, art must show the world as changeable. And help to change it.”
― Ernst Fischer

Here is my entry for Del Monte Y Mar’s Tuesdays of Texture Challenge Week 13 of 2017.

As I walked the streets of Todos Santos, Mexico a few brief weeks ago, enjoying the architecture, which is so different from home, I spotted this wall along one of the main streets.

It interested me immediately and I took the time to really look at it, to appreciate the textures and colours and create a mental story of the image. The exact location is a memory, but I could probably find it again.

What stood out at first, and what initially got my attention, was the deep reddish colour and grain of the exposed brick against, what at first, appeared to be a bright white wall. It was not till I looked closer that all the sub layers revealed themselves.

There’s the first layer of mortar, which holds the brick together and serves as an initial coating, then another layer of plaster, to smooth it out. That layer seems to have been painted a bright blue, and a subsequent layer of red, since weathered and coated with another layer of creamy adobe.

The crack exposes all these layers in a complex composition of colour and texture that just seems to work. Some may walk by and think it an eyesore, complaining that the building owner should repair it. But, there’s not much rain in this region and it will probably not be attended to for years to come. For some of us, a simple thing like a crack in a wall can become a world of its own, beauty in the mundane, and I’m happy to see it that way.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Thursday Doors – June 09, 2016 – “Mind Your Step”

“Mind Your Step” - Distillery District, Toronto

This week’s submission for For Thursday Doors – June 9, 2016 by Norm 2.0.

Made at Toronto’s Distillery District. A flash back to Toronto’s past in this wonderfully preserved historical district.

This particular door caught my attention, since it is quite high up. I imagine it would have been used as a loading door. I like the contrast of the bright green against the old red brick.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/60 sec, f/2.8, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Store Fronts” – Front Street, Toronto

“Store Fronts” - Front Street, Toronto

“Imagine having a city full of things that no other city had.”
― Bill Bryson

Old meets new in this view of Toronto’s Front Street, near the St. Lawrence Market.

The area reminds me of Europe, with it’s old buildings and storefronts. It’s sad to think that much of Toronto looked like this till the wave of “Urban Renewal” in the 70’s demolished most of the old buildings to make room for…parking lots!

Yup, apparently, parking lots were what people needed and the wonderful architecture paid the price. There are still some vestiges of Toronto’s architectural past remaining: the Annex, Front Street, and the Distillery to name a few, but they are few and far between.

I imagine the original builders did not ever expect the building to become a coffee shop, in fact, I had clients in this area who used upper floors as office space and it looked like these would have been warehouses at one point in time, based on the thick floors and heavy wooden beams inside the buildings.

Nikon D800
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 145 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Corkin Gallery Stairs and Arches”

“Corkin Gallery Stairs & Arches”

“Human society is like an arch, kept from falling by the mutual pressure of its parts”
– Seneca

The Toronto Distillery District is known for its boutiques, art galleries, and restaurants. One of the art galleries in this area is the Corkin Gallery, featuring artists of many disciplines.

Within this large gallery are some of the original distillery structures, including these interesting arches which lead to two staircases to the second floor of the gallery. I like how the gallery retained the significant architectural elements of the distillery in their floorplan. It blends past and present beautifully. There was something about how the modern (stairs) and old (arches) blended together into a whole that just felt right.

I also enjoyed the various textures, from the age and patina of the brick, blotchy, cracked concrete, smooth steel handrails, and the clean lines of the glass and wood of the staircase. The staircase feels like an anachronism, placed as an escape from the ancient arches, a bridge to some uncertain future.

iPhone 5s back camera 4.15mm f/2.2
1/20 sec;   f/2.2;   ISO 320

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com