Tag Archives: Canada

Thursday Doors | June 15, 2017

Beverly House Doors - Royal Ontario Museum

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Beverly House Doors” – Royal Ontario Museum

Doors in a museum? Imagine my surprise.

On a visit to the Royal Ontario Museum a few months back, I entered a section of the museum tucked away from most of the traffic and discovered an entire section dedicated to the history of Canada. Why was I not previously aware of this?

Among this collection, I was surprised to see several historic doors on display. This was quite a surprise, that someone cared enough about doors to preserve them.

The above door , circa 1822, belonged to Beverly House, the residence of Sir John Beverley Robinson (1791 -1863), Chief Justice of Upper Canada, was one of the most impressive residences in early Toronto. It was located at the northeast corner of John and Richmond Streets. Robinson, the son of a Loyalist from Virginia, was one of the most powerful men in Ontario in his time. The house was demolished around 1913.

The door was a gift to the museum from the Ursuline Religious of the Chatham Union in Toronto.

Thank goodness someone had the foresight to preserve this door for generations to enjoy.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/7 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 80

 

“Waterfront Guardians”

“Waterfront Guardians”

“Well, best to remain vigilant. It’s when everything is calm that you need to be most alert.”
― Brandon Sanderson

Above is an image of a pair of Canada Geese, standing guard on a path leading to the shores of Lake Ontario. Those familiar with Canada Geese know that they can be very territorial, especially later in the spring, during nesting season.

I stood and watched them for a bit before approaching them. They had been standing here, barely moving for quite some time and I watched how they reacted as people approached. In the end, they simply stood their ground, the gander letting out a brief hiss of warning if anyone approached a bit too closely.

Having witnessed this, I walked past them and they barely batted an eye. On my return, they still had not moved and were still doing an excellent job at keeping visitors uneasy.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 155mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0 ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Algonquin Dreams”

Algonquin Dreams

“All things want to float as light as air through the world witnessing all that is. I am a mote of dust floating freely in the firmament, a person who merely is, and I feel full of joy for all worldly treasures, the immaculate gift of life.”
― Kilroy J. Oldster

8″ x 10″ acrylic on canvas.

I’m quite enjoying my new found hobby and getting the feel of the brush. This is my 9th painting, since taking it up in February. I have the advantage of having many photographs to base the paintings on, though I take quite a bit of liberty in my interpretation of the final image. I also have the advantage of being able to photograph them and retaining all the true colors.
The basis of this image was a canoe trip into Ontario’s Algonquin park, many years ago. I clearly recall the colours of the clouds on that warm, midsummer day, splashes of pinks amid the pure whites. Fond memories of blissful days on the water in my canoe.

 

“Mid-March Chickadee”

“Mid-March Chickadee”

“I can assure you that the life outside the front door is bright and full of life”
― Sunday Adelaja

I could not resist publishing this bright little fellow today. It’s dull,cold, and dreary outside and I’m thinking back to last week, when the sun shone through, briefly. WHile on a short stroll to get a breath of fresh air, I came across this Chickadee, also enjoying the bright sunshine from his perch among the red-osier dogwoods.

While the chickadees do stay around through the winter here, it’s been pleasant to hear them singing once more, yet another harbinger of spring, which seems to be coming in fits and starts this year.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 300mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Cold Water Visitor”

“Cold Water Visitor”

“I am so grateful to be here on this awesome planet with its diverse life – everything we need to not just survive but to thrive. I am excited to continually learn more about it, and always curious to see what is going to come up next.”
― Jay Woodman

While photographing the Lake Ontario shore line recently, one of the thousands of Canada Geese floating offshore decided to give me a closer look. Most of the geese tend to be fairly tame, being in close proximity with humans in this area.

People and geese tend to occupy the same spaces, along the shore, in parks, and open fields. It becomes a bit of a problem when the geese get dependant on humans, who provide them food and the opportunity for food. In some parks, the geese don’t even migrate south anymore, since they have all they need. That becomes an even bigger problem when the temperatures drop, which has been fairly infrequent her in the past few years. But, deep drops in temperature can freeze even large bodies of water like Lake Ontario. We’ve had some mild winters, but extended cold spells are a game changer, sometimes leaving the geese without the open water they need.

In any case, this one wanted to get a closer look at me. I tend not to photograph the Canada Geese much, primarily because they are so commonplace around here. This one made me look again. As it emerged from the frigid waters, small drops of water glistened on its breast feathers, like small jewels in the late afternoon sun, and it posed so nicely for me, I simply could not resist the opportunity.

There’s also the small pile of melting snow to the left, a reminder that winter is not quite finished with us here.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 70mm
1/320 sec, f/10.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“February Thaw”

“February Thaw”

“By March, the worst of the winter would be over. The snow would thaw, the rivers begin to run and the world would wake into itself again.

Not that year.

Winter hung in there, like an invalid refusing to die. Day after grey day the ice stayed hard; the world remained unfriendly and cold.”
― Neil Gaiman

February has been an odd one here on Southern Ontario. After the snows of December, we had a gradual melt-freeze-melt cycle which left the ground essentially bare at the start of the month, with the occasional ice patch.

Last week, the snows returned and we have had some significant accumulations and a lot of drifting. One recent storm caught me off guard and had e driving through white-out conditions a few times, something I have not experienced for years and a not so gentle reminder that I do live in Canada.

One of the side benefits of these melt cycles is the beautiful icicles which form on days where the snow just begins to melt and then freezes up again. It’s even nicer when the sun break through and lights them up for me. It’s especially nice to see the sun because this winter we have had record days of cloud cover, which from a photographer’s standpoint is not a bad thing, but I do miss the sun’s warmth and brightness. I am looking forward to continued warming and the inevitable spring.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/100 sec, f/9.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Diaphanous”

“Diaphanous”

“Time leaches the colors from the best of visions. The world becomes grayer. Entropy beats us down. Everything fades. Everything goes. Everything dies.”
― Robert Silverberg

Back outdoors again, in the midst of a January thaw, too much of a thaw, actually. As I set out on the trails, expecting ice, which I was prepared for, I was faced with deep, slushy, wet snow, tough to walk in and impossible to grip, even with my ice cleats. It made for a fairly exhausting hike, but I was determined to complete my usual five kilometer loop today and make some photos along the way, if they offered themselves.

The day started out moody, dull, and foggy, which inspired me to get out to photograph for of this atmosphere, but by the time I drove to my destination, the fog had dissipated, so I proceeded to hike.

Mild temperatures and showers over the past few days had knocked many of the last remaining leaves to the ground and they rested on the grainy, wet snow. An interesting effect of the moisture and changing temperatures was that many of them seemed very ‘thin’, diaphanous, as they littered the snowy forest floor, slowly decaying. The snow itself was not a pure white either, rather, spotted with particles of dirt and dust which had accumulated so far this winter. I would have prefered a pure white background, but the spots enhance the image a bit by showing through the leaf.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com