Tag Archives: cathedral

Thursday Doors – December 22, 2016

“Notre Dame Cathedral Doors” - Montreal

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

The grand doors of Notre Dame Cathedral in Montreal. As in the case of many popular locations, I had to wait a while till there was nobody entering or exiting via these front doors.

It does always surprise me, when I review my photos of things I think I know well, all the details my brain seems to filter out. Things like the chains to hold the doors open, the light recesses in the floor just to the sides of the door, and those annoying spike to keep pigeons away from the ledge above the door. I hope you enjoy losing yourself in the details as well.

 

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“Altar of St. John the Baptist” – St. Patrick’s Cathedral, New York

“Altar of St. John the Baptist” - St. Patrick’s Cathedral, New .jpg

And he was preaching, and saying, “After me One is coming who is mightier than I, and I am not fit to stoop down and untie the thong of His sandals. “I baptized you with water; but He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit.” – Mark 1:7-8

Existing light photography offers its challenges and rewards. This wonderful statue of St. John the Baptist, in New York’s St. Patrick’s cathedral is a good example of how existing light can enhance the image. The light is soft and warm and produces a sense of peace, at least for me. The light falls off a bit near the top of the image, bringing out the details of the face.

That’s the benefit, the challenge is having to use a high ISO often introduces unwanted noise, which used to be a significant issue with 35 mm film, but is less of an issue with our modern DSLRs and editing software.

I made several other images while visiting this great metropolitan cathedral, which I will share over time.

Nikon D300
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/60 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1000

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Thursday Doors – April 28, 2016

“Stationnement Prive” - Notre Dame Cathedral, Montreal

An interesting side entrance to Notre Dame Cathedral in Montreal. It would appear the door was added as an afterthought.

iPhone 5s back camera 4.15mm f/2.2
1/125 sec;   f/2.2;   ISO 40

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Lady Chapel” – St. Patrick’s Cathedral, New York

“Lady Chapel” - Saint Patrick Cathedral - New York

“When introverts go to church, we crave sanctuary in every sense of the word, as we flee from the disorienting distractions of twenty-first-century life. We desire to escape from superficial relationships, trivial communications and the constant noise that pervade our world, and find rest in the probing depths of God’s love.”
― Adam S. McHugh

I have real love of sacred places. Cathedrals are such humbling places, filled with quiet places to sooth the soul and vast humbling spaces that force the eyes to the heavens, yet make us look inward. They are also architectural wonders where I lose myself in the complexity of mighty columns and soaring arches.

St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City is no exception. It is a vast, marvelous, church built of rich white marble, and surrounded by the busy shops of 5th Avenue, yet offers worshipers and visitors alike, moments of peace and reflection. The cathedral itself was built between 1858 and 1879 in a Gothic Revival style and the Lady Chapel (above) was added in 1906.

For such a vast place, there are many places, such as the Lady Chapel, where you can separate from the tourists and their ever present selfie-sticks, to reflect and pray in a peaceful place. The Lady Chapel is off limits to cameras, which is a great thing, yet I wanted to capture the wonder of this sacred place, and was able to accomplish it, from a distance, with my long lense, without disturbing the sanctity of this important worship space.

As with my earlier image of the Pieta,  I shot with existing light, to capture the natural colours and textures, while not disturbing the space with a bright flash. It is, after all, a place of worship and should be respected.The warmth of this space is particularly appealing to me, accented by the wonderful sea-blue of the stained glass windows.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm
1/60 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1,000

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Pieta” – St. Patrick’s Cathedral, New York

“The Pieta” - St. Patrick’s Cathedral, New York

“As he reached the door of the chapel and turned back for a last look, he saw that the Virgin too was sad and lonely; the most alone human being God ever put on earth.”
― Irving Stone

The word ‘pieta’ means pity in Italian. The scene of the Virgin Mary, with the recently crucified Christ on her lap, is one of the most iconic scenes in christianity and has been interpreted through many forms of art, including sculpture. The most famous of these sculptures is, of course, Michelangelo’s version, housed in St. Peter’s basilica in Rome.

This rendition sits just right and slightly behind the main altar at St. Patrick’s in New York City, was sculpted in 1906 by William Ordway Partridge, and was donated to the cathedral in 1915. It is about three times the size of Michelangelo’s version and is one of the church’s many treasures.

I made the image using existing light because of how it lit the statue so softly and kept Mary’s face in the shadows of her shawl. I’m also averse to using a flash in a place of worship. It really is a beautiful statue and tells a powerful story of a mother’s love and loss.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm
1/60 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1,000

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Dome” – Cathédrale Marie-Reine-du-Monde, Montreal

“Dome” - Cathédrale Marie-Reine-du-Monde, Montreal

“It’s attention to detail that makes the difference between average and stunning”
– Francis Atterbury

From my hotel room in downtown Montreal, this view greeted me every day. The dome of  Cathédrale Marie-Reine-du-Monde (Mary, Queen of the World Cathedral) fascinated me. The lines and detail are beautiful and I could spend hours scanning over the dome finding small details in the larger view, including the differences in the ‘dormer’ window roofs from peaked to rounded (made you look!).

The 19th century cathedral dominates a large block  in downtown Montreal, in strong contrast to the shining glass towers and neon lights that surround it.

I felt the black and white treatment accented the details and subdues the bright blue sky, forcing the eye to the dome itself.

Nikon D300
Tamron 17.0-50.0 mm f/2.8 @ 50mm
1/400 sec, f/10, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Day’s Last Light”

"Day’s Last Light” - Markham, Ontario

This photo was made within a few minutes of my previous post, “Golden Hour”. The same cloud fragments remain in the sky, the remnants of an earlier storm.

I had finished photographing the lone maple and was driving home and was amazed at the colour and textures of the sky as it transitioned from gold to a ruddy orange. Not wanting to miss the sunset, I parked my car at the top of a hill just south of town and watched the drama unfold in the west. My goal was to capture the last sliver of sun before it dropped below horizon. The photo above is the result.

On the horizon, you can see the silhouette of the Cathedral of the Transfiguration, in Markham, Ontario. This cathedral was blessed by Pope John Paul in 1984. Interestingly, the church lost it’s “Cathedral” designation back in 2006 as the result of a dispute and last service was held June 25, 2006. It now sits abandoned, unused, and deteriorating.

This final moment of sunlight lasted only a few seconds and then it was gone, turning the sky a deep red filled with wispy dark clouds and bright orange streaks.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300mm f/5.6 @140mm

132 sec @ f/5.6, ISO 200