Tag Archives: chnage

“A Shift to Bronze”

“A Shift to Bronze”

“I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.” 
― L. M. Montgomery

As I prepare for my 2018 Studio Tour, it gives me time to reflect on present photos, as well as those from previous years and I am astounded about how many have been printed, yet I have not taken the time to comment on them.

This image is one of those photos that for one reason or another was set aside. Interestingly, as I was preparing images for the Studio Tour, this one was chosen by three different individuals to be included.

The photo was made last autumn, a week after last year’s Tour. It was interesting, because the Tour weekend falls on the weekend after Canadian Thanksgiving, usually a peak period for autumn colours and I was slightly bemoaning the fact that I was missing out on this.

The day was cool, and windy, but the leaves were still hanging on quite well, despite this. Much of the predominant green and yellow was starting to fade and oranges, golds and bronzes were taking hold. It was the start of my “Golden Paths” series and has become one of my more powerful series of autumn images.

Here, I’m hiking past a familiar cluster of birch trees, with their yellow leaves just starting to wither and backfilled with the golden bronzes of the many beech trees. It really represents that ‘shift’ in colours so prominent at that particular time of year.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/4 sec, f/32.0 ISO 100

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“Forest Tent Caterpillar”

“Tent Caterpillar”

“And I wonder if the caterpillar at the threshold of death ever knew that she would get metamorphosed into a butterfly that she could fly.” 
― Chirag Tulsiani

Our camp area was overrun with these caterpillars this past weekend. We’ve been going to the same location for fourteen years and I can’t recall ever seeing so many tent caterpillars, though I did not actually see a colony in any neighbouring trees. On researching this, what I thought was an Eastern Tent Caterpillar, turned out to be a Forest Tent Caterpillar. The colouring is slightly different and the Forest Tent Caterpillar does not congregate inside the tent, rather in ‘clumps’ high in the host trees. The individual caterpillars were everywhere as were completed cocoons. Every nook and cranny had a yellow silk cocoon attached to them. At some point in the next three weeks, the northern forest will be filled with moderately sized, brown moths.

As a child, this was the most common caterpillar and thus, the first exposure we had to the life cycle of moths and butterflies. Because they are covered in hairs, they were more appealing than some of their naked cousins. I think all my friend’s bug jars housed one of these at one point, though we had no idea what they actually ate. Some survived, many perished.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/80 sec, f/22.0 ISO 800

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Progression”

“Progression”

“The step that we are on is only a step to the next place, and no step regardless of how massive is ever a destination.”
― Craig D. Lounsbrough

It’s been cool here the past few days, and the daffodils are still blooming. A handful are still opening. So, I took that as an opportunity to create this image of the daffodil blossom in its various stages of opening.

I’m finding this an interesting exercise, noting that not just the blossom changes but also the angle of the blossom, which starts out low and then moves upward to face the sun.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1.0 sec, f/29.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

or more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Pink Verbena”

“Pink Verbena”

“When one tunes in into nature’s frequency, life becomes change, change becomes hope!”
― Aniekee Tochukwu Ezekiel

This has been a year of change and experimentation for me. It’s all been fairly carefully thought out and exciting. I’ve experimented with new photographic techniques, such as macro photography and new ways of editing, like using some Photoshop plugins to create paintings from my photos. I also experimented with some new varieties of plants in my gardens, breaking away from my go-to plants and placing splashes of colour and multiple layers in the flower beds.

Here I managed to combine several new things into one. The image is a close up, not quite a macro, image of one of my new plants, a pink verbena. I liked how the bright pink just jumps out at me, so I decided to isolate it further, as a colour layer and kept the background back and white. I like the result. Change really can be good!

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom
@ 300 mm
1/60 sec, f/5.6, ISO 720

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“A Shift in the Winds” – Stouffville Reservoir

“A Shift in the Winds” - Stouffville Reservoir

September, the month where some days convince you that summer will last for weeks, yet others are  stern reminders that change is inevitable. This holds true this year. After weeks of above average, sweltering days, the temperature plummets and we layer on hats and sweatshirts, wondering if this summer has passed us by.

The saving grace, for me is the gradual change of colours. The once verdant trees begin to shift to shades of orange and yellow. I do like the change and variety this time of year brings with it. I recall the days of new growth and flawless leaves. As I look around me now, those leaves are showing evidence of the hardships of days in sun and heat bring on. Edges are browned and shrivelled. Black spots of age dot the once pristine surfaces, leading to the inevitable fall.

Such was my walk today. The grove of poplars pictured above was a beautiful range of bright greens and yellows and the wind made them dance with life. Above me, a falcon disturbed the sparrows, who fled his hungry eyes with shrill chirps. The whole forest was alive with activity and bathed in glorious golden light.

I was happy to get out with my camera again to enjoy and capture this unique moment and, hopefully, bring some of that joy to others.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300 mm @ 95mm
1/4 sec @ f/25, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Reservoir Poplars” – Stouffville Reservoir

“Reservoir Poplars” - Stouffville Reservoir

Yet another tree abstraction. I’ve walked past these poplars many times, and every time, the light is a bit different or the foliage in the background has changed, every so slightly. This photo was made on Saturday as I went for a walk around our local reservoir. On this particular visit, the trees and undergrowth are not yet in bud and the bright red of the Red-Osier Dogwood shows clearly to the lower left, while the bright green of the cedars glows in the background. There is still a reminder that winter is not long past in the dull grey-brown of the ground at the base of the poplars.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 70 mm
1/4 sec @f/32, ISO 200