Tag Archives: churn

TUESDAYS OF TEXTURE | WEEK 16 OF 2017

“Under the Fall”

“Under the Fall”

Here is my entry for Del Monte Y Mar’s Tuesdays of Texture Challenge Week 16 of 2017.

The ‘texture’ of water. The rolling structure and varying colour is what caused me to make this photo of teh churning water below a local dam. I wasn’t sure if i’d use it for a Tuesday Texture submission, by the more I looked at it the more I was compelled to do so.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1/1250 sec, f/3.5, ISO 100

“The Maddening Rush”

“The Maddening Rush” - Duffins Creek Thaw

“No reason for a feverish rush
For we will all arrive in the same place
At the right time. Justice will be served.
There will be no better or worse,
No big and small, no rewards, no punishment,
No guilt, no judges, no hierarchies;
Only silent equality.”
― Dejan Stojanovic

The image above could be a churning ocean or a stormy beach, but it’s a small section of creek below the falls at Whitevale, Ontario. I enjoyed the way the light played through water creating the glow from within the  wave. There’s an element to fast flowing water that I am drawn to. I like to play with my shutter speed, matching it to the flow of the water to convey this movement in my photos and I like how this one turned out because it shows the speed and surge of the water the way it appeared to me. A lot of water rushes through the rocks in this area just below the dam, creating a small section of low, but active set of rapids.

And after a short span in the tumult, the creek calms once more, around a gentle bend.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 90 mm
1/15 sec, f/32, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Conflict” – Point Clarke

“Conflict” - Point Clarke, Ontario

I could not think of a better title for this photo. To me, it speaks conflict in so many forms. This day in late December was the transition from an extended mild fall to a bitter, biting winter. The crepuscular rays (yes, that’s what they are actually called), offer a sense of peace in contrast to the tumult of the icy waters below. Crepuscular rays are colloquially known as a Jacob’s Ladder, Gateways to Heaven, Buddha’s Fingers, Jesus Beams, God’s Rays, sunbeams, cloud breaks and many other names. It is not surprising that many of the names have religious connotations as crepuscular rays seem to be a message from the gods. What message is being expressed here? “Winter is coming?”

The very waters are churning in conflict, rising in sharp peaks and churning over each other, urgent for the shore.

The temperatures had dropped from a wondrous 13 degrees celsius mere days ago to a blustery minus 6 with a 60km/h wind that literally sucked the breath from my lungs and froze my fingers numb in minutes. While I love being outdoors whenever possible, this instance may be an exception, as it was truly unpleasant, except for the scene unfolding in front to me. From the comfort of a warm car or house, this may have been a vista I could have revelled at for hours.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 82mm
1/200 sec, f/7.1, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com