Tag Archives: clouds

“Into the North” – Youngs Point

"Into the North" - Youngs Point

“The most beautiful things happen, along the way. Stop and enjoy them.”
– Ed Lehming

Today, I’m doing a quick post and starting to get myself back into the discipline of posting and writing about my photos more frequently. I realized just how much I had dropped from my routine.

I had a significantly disruptive life event in March, which pulled the rug out from under me, creatively. I may talk about that at some point, as I continue to process it. Needless to say, the event caused me to stop doing the thing I love. Namely, photography.

It’s a strange thing that I fell away from the very thing that has always been my outlet and refuge through all the stresses life throws at us.

Over the past few weeks, I’ve done the very thing that I encourage others to do. Simply stop and enjoy all the beautiful things along the way.

The image above was taken from the side of the highway on our way north to our camper. I’d been admiring the thunderstorms on the horizon for some time, but there was never a good view from places where it was safe to stop. Finally, I found a short opening that offered this view of the clouds, lit up bright pink by the setting sun.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 70 mm
1/80 sec, f/4.5, ISO 1250

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Iceland Journal – “Clouds Roll in at Kleifarvatn” – Iceland

“The clouds roll in, but don’t persist, they bring a welcome contrast and make us more aware of how lovely the sunshine is.”
– Ed Lehming

I really can’t imagine Iceland without its marvelous clouds. During our ten-day trip, every day had some cloud. Often, there are multiple layers, each slightly different and moving in different directions, creating a magical yet fleeting, play of light.

As a photographer, the quality of light is very important and I did not have to wait long for lighting conditions to shift. The clouds would tease and taunt me as they danced among the mountains, often hinting at what lay within their shroud and revealing glimpses of high mountain tops. Sometimes shafts of sunlight would pierce them, creating brilliant patches of illumination.

I’ve seen the photos made by other photographers, of places I visited, in bright sunshine, but some of the character is missing. It seems to me, that Icelandic landscapes require some quantity of cloud to show their true essence. This is, after all, a wild and rugged country and the ever-changing weather is part of that.

In the photo above, one of the last ones I made as we departed Reykjavik and headed toward the airport, by yet another ‘indirect’ route. The lake is Kleifarvatn and is a moderately sized lake about 15 kilometers south of Reykjavik. Our destination on our final day was the geothermal hot springs at Krysuvik, just south of the lake. The road followed the shore of the lake for some time and gave the opportunity for several final images of this enchanted land.

The water was just smooth enough to give a soft reflection of the flattened Vatnshliðarhorn mountain to the north, the sun brightly illuminating the yellow grasses along its base.

It’s this wonderful mix of sun and cloud that has provided the beautiful mood for many of my photos; ever-changing and creating new vistas by the moment. I look back on these photos fondly as I near the end of this series and close out the year feeling blessed to have experienced this majesty with my son.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 70 mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0 ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Iceland Journal – “Across the Fertile Valley” – Southwest Iceland

“I am reminded that the most fertile lands are often built by the fires of volcanoes.” 
― Ed Lehming

On the seventh day of our Iceland journey, my son and I travelled through the high mountain passes at the base of the West Fjords, southward along Highway 60 to rejoin the Ring Road, just north of the town of Bifrost.

We were greeted by this spectacular view of a broad valley, filled with meandering rivers and lush farmlands, stretching to the horizon, some 30 kilometers distant, which is bounded by the Skarðheiði mountain cluster and dominated by steep sloped Skessuhorn, poking from a persistent cloud bank, which did not break up all day and kept the rest of the mountains obscured. I could not keep my eyes off Skessuhorn as we drove along, and eventually into, the valley, which is bounded in this view by the Norðurá river. The Norðurá joins several other rivers to form a small delta, just north of the town of Borgarnes, our final destination on this day of travels. I have included a link to the high-resolution version of this image, should you care to have a closer look.

This is a truly remarkable area for Iceland, in that it a very large expanse of farmland, though it is still a very active geothermal area, interspersed with hot springs throughout the valley. An aerial view of this region shows it to have been formed by glaciers, carving and eroding the volcanic bedrock and creating ideal conditions for rivers to flow and deposit their rich, mineral laden silt within the valleys carved by the glaciers.

It was this area that we intended to explore that day and it led us through the farmland, past steaming vents, cold glacial streams of turquoise, and up into the highlands and lava fields of the Hallmundarhraun and the peaks of Ok and Eiriksjökull. It was, in the typical fashion of Iceland, an incredible change in environments, within a fairly short distance of some 30 kilometers. The trip also included a stop at the magnificent Hraunfosser waterfalls, which I have already discussed in a previous post.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 116mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Churning”

“Churning”

“I love to feel the temperature drop and the wind increase just before a thunderstorm. Then I climb in bed with the thunder.” 
― Amanda Mosher

I wanted to revisit this storm cloud. This image was made mere seconds after my previously posted photo. Seconds make all the difference in the nature of these clouds. The form changes and the light shiftsdramatically. The other thing that changes rapidly, as noted in the quote I chose for this image, is the temperature. One minute its hot and humid and within seconds the wind whips harsh and chilly.

I simply loved watching this cloud change form. It was a rapid and significant change and I’m committed to trying my hand at time-lapse next time I get the opportunity. Even the tonal shift is startling, yet barely noticeable while observing it live. Yet, the photos show a big difference across a span of mere seconds. This cloud just boiled and seethed as the winds within it pulled and churned inside it. It makes me wonder just how intense those internal winds really are, given how fast things changed?

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 100mm
1/400 sec, f/10.0 ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Looming”

“Looming”

“There is peace even in the storm” 
― Vincent van Gogh

I’m one of those people who loves storms. There is something in the unbridled power of them that fascinates me. I love the many forms that the clouds take as the winds whip and shape them. There is also something glorious in the way the storm changes the light.

A few days ago, after coming home from a nice dinner with my wife, I saw this storm cloud forming behind my house. I ran inside, grabbed my camera, and made a few images as it quickly billowed higher into the sky, changing form every second, hoping to capture it at it’s peak, before it tore itself apart or diffused. I was also working with great light and did not want to miss the bright rays playing off the sky behind it and within the cloud itself.

My goal is always to capture an image representative of what I saw, as well as how I perceived it. Here, I was trying to capture the play of early evening light within the cloud as well as the ominous feeling of the deep tones within the cloud. I think I succeeded in both and am very pleased with the results of a quickly composed shot.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 100mm
1/400 sec, f/10.0 ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Summer Breeze, Makes Me Feel Fine”

“Summer Breeze, Makes Me Feel Fine”

“Rest is not idleness, and to lie sometimes on the grass under trees on a summer’s day, listening to the murmur of the water, or watching the clouds float across the sky, is by no means a waste of time.”
– John Lubbock

What can I say? Wildflowers in a gentle summer breeze, what can be better? This group of Yellow Coneflowers, springing from a sea of Wild Bergamot on a clear, hot summer day, is about as peaceful as it gets and brings back to mind the Seals and Crofts song, “Summer Breeze.” Though there is no “jasmine in bloom” in this scene, the feeling is about the same.

The puffy clouds in the background are simply the icing on the cake ,in this simple composition. A sweet, sweet memory of summer to look back to when the mercury drops.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/2000 sec, f/6.3 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Tuesdays of Texture – Week 31 of 2017

“Lazy Summer Skies”

“Lazy Summer Skies”

Here is my entry for Del Monte Y Mar’s Tuesdays of Texture Challenge Week 31 of 2017

“When people look at clouds they do not see their real shape, which is no shape at all, or every shape, because they are constantly changing. They see whatever it is that their heart yearns for.” 
― José Eduardo Agualusa

An often overlooked texture is the sky above us, with its infinite variations, never the same twice, rarely the same for long.

I made this image after a few moments photographing the wildflowers and insects in the meadow at the end of my street. On my way back home, I could not help but marvel at the gorgeous cloud formations, so typical of hot summer days in southern Ontario.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/1600 sec, f/10.0 ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com