Tag Archives: Colour

“Into the Mystic”

“Into the Mystic”

We were born before the wind
Also younger than the sun
Ere the bonnie boat was won
As we sailed into the mystic

Hark, now hear the sailors cry
Smell the sea and feel the sky
Let your soul and spirit fly into the mystic

And when that foghorn blows
I will be coming home
And when the foghorn blows
I want to hear it

I don’t have to fear it and I want to rock your gypsy soul
Just like way back in the days of old
And magnificently we will flow into the mystic

-Van Morrison

I’m not sure where to begin with this image. It has fascinated me since I made it back in mid-September. I was playing with depth of field with my manual macro tubes, focussing on a few peruvian lilies that I had taken from a bouquet.

The results reminded me of a nebula from a science fiction movie, some alien life form, or a vision from a dream. I settled on the dream and thought of the Van Morrison song “Into the Mystic”. The title has stuck with me since then. I have just not gotten around to publishing the image. And, as I edit, and write this post, listening to the music, I’m still pulled into the image, with its intricate detail and bright colours. It literally ‘pulls’ me in and I flow into the mystic. It’s alight with energy, movement, and life. It is peace and chaos.

Nikon D800
Nikor 24-70mm f/3.5-4.6 @ @ 48 mm
3.0 sec, f/25.0, ISO 400

Hi Resolution image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Visions of Autumn – Orange Maple”

“Visions of Autumn - Orange Maple”

“And that afternoon, as the sun slanted low through the changing autumn leaves, I remembered to savor the moment, soak in the beauty, breathe deeply and feel the immensity of God.”
― Cindee Snider Re

The next component to nature’s fall palette around here is orange. Interestingly, when I got closer to this branch for a bright orange maple tree, I found a surprising amount of green and yellow, with patches of red and orange. The result, when viewed from a distance is a blazing orange.

This tree, in it’s entirety, can be seen in a post I made of few days ago (it’s the large tree near the back of the group).

I’m quite enjoying this study series and hoping the colours don’t fade before I can build a good collection of images. Bt with autumn, we can only hang on for so long and then it’s gone. I’m hoping for an extension like we had last year. Fingers crossed.

Nikon D800
Nikor 28-70mm f/3.5-4.6 @ 70mm
1 .3 sec, f/25.0, ISO 400

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Visions of Autumn – Red Maple”

“Visions of Autumn - Red Maple”

“Fall colors are funny. They’re so bright and intense and beautiful. It’s like nature is trying to fill you up with color, to saturate you, so you can stockpile it before winter turns everything muted and dreary.”
― Siobhan Vivian

Today I started photographing fall colours a bit differently. Rather than the broad sweep of forests in full colour, I decided to look a bit closer at the branches that create this wonder. Using the black backdrop, I was able to isolate the branches and leaves to show off the finer details.

These leaves are natural, less than perfect, showing the wear and tear of a hot  and dry summer. In fact, I’m quite amazed at the depth of colours this year. I would have thought that the heat stress would have made for a mostly brown and muted autumn, but nature has surprised me with a depth and range of colour I can’t recall seeing for years.

I’ll be spending the next few days sharing more recent images of my native trees in their autumn colours, until business travel pulls me away for a few days. But till then, I’m happy to be able to share this experience with you.

Nikon D800
Nikor 28-70mm f/3.5-4.6 @ 48mm
1 .0 sec, f/20.0, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“A Mix of Sun and Cloud” – Altona, Ontario

“A Mix of Sun and Cloud” - Altona, Ontario

“Just as a painter needs light in order to put the finishing touches to his picture, so I need an inner light, which I feel I never have enough of in the autumn.”
― Leo Tolstoy

I’ve titled myself a ‘photo opportunist’ a few times. Really, it’s all about being prepared for any eventuality. This means knowing my gear, settings, and my surroundings. A lot has to do with experience, most bad to mediocre. The many images that ‘could have been’, but did not turn out because I was not properly prepared and inexperienced.

This was not the case today. I went for a brief drive through the countryside near my house. It made for a nice lunch break and cleared my mind.

The forecast was for a mix of sun and cloud and that is exactly what we got. A newscaster this morning asked where the line is between this forecast and mostly sunny or mostly cloudy. That seemed to depend on the time of day, as the cloud cover was very variable, but looking distinctly like autumn, with heavy clouds passing by quickly overhead, a cool breeze and the threat of intermittent showers at any time.

The trick, if you will, to photographing in these conditions is simply patience and choosing a subject and location. As I drove down the country lane, I noticed this cluster of maple trees lit up by a narrow sliver of sun, with the contrasting dark sky as a backdrop. Determined to capture this, I got closer, framed my shot and sat, waiting for another break in the cloud. I was not disappointed. Within minutes, the sun broke through the clouds, setting the trees ablaze with light, while leaving the foreground in shadow. The effect is stunning and I was able to accurately capture one of those great autumn moments to share here.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom
@ 122 mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Five Flowers”

“Five Flowers”

“Whatever your passion is, keep doing it. Don’t waste time chasing after success or comparing yourself to others. Every flower blooms at a different pace. Excel at doing what your passion is and only focus on perfecting it. Eventually people will see what you are great at doing, and if you are truly great, success will come chasing after you.”
― Suzy Kassem

Those who follow my blog will recognise some of these as the subjects of my recent photos. The composition came about quite by accident. You see, as I was photographing the individual flowers, I was standing them up, side by side, on a bench when I was finished. As I added the orchid on the right to the lineup, I thought to myself that this ‘lineup’ might be interesting as an image as well.

The composition was quite simple but to balance the light across all these colours and textures without one or another dominating the image was a bit of a challenge.

It seems to have worked out and I’m pleased with the result. However, titling the image proved difficult, so I stuck with something simple and appropriate. I hope you like it.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 110mm
1/6 sec, f/20.0, ISO 400

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Coleus”

“Coleus”

“A garden should make you feel you’ve entered privileged space — a place not just set apart but reverberant — and it seems to me that, to achieve this, the gardener must put some kind of twist on the existing landscape, turn its prose into something nearer poetry.”
― Michael Pollan

I thought I would try this technique on leafy plants and expand from my blossom photos. We have several varieties of coleus in our gardens, but this one has weathered the drought better than the rest.

The wonder of coleus is that you can take a little sprig of it, place it in water for a few weeks to root and grow a whole new plant. For me, that’s great, as they winter over well and offer nice colour all summer long.

I did cheat a bit on this image. Because the plant was quite dry and flat, I misted it with water before making the photo.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/5 sec, f/11.0, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Into the Rose” – Enfolded in Love

"Into the Rose"

“Of all the flowers, the rose speaks to me, especially, of love. The delicate petals, layer by delicate layer, draw me to the heart, while the fragrance entrances me with its subtle sweetness. Promising future passions, while echoing back to tender memories” – Ed Lehming

I had not, till now, deeply explored my thoughts and feelings on roses. Those feelings are complex and tied together by many threads of memory. My father and maternal grandmother were both avid gardeners. Since my grandmother lived with us, the two spent much time pursuing their mutual love of gardening together. I found this an odd, but wonderful teaming. My mother had no real interest in gardening, other than enjoying the final product as the backyard filled with sweet fragrances and bright colours.

The gardens were carefully planned and cared for, weeds were quickly plucked from this sacred place, reserved for the chosen plants and  no others.

What stands out for me, and the topic of this post, is their extraordinary gift for growing roses. I have no idea of what the varieties were, though I consider myself a talented gardener, my dad and grandmother had a true gift for growing roses. Be it climbers, bushes, what have you. Every garden was ‘anchored’ by some form of rose. I regret never asking them where this passion for roses came from. My grandmother grew up in Berlin and my father came from a small village along the Oder river, in present day Poland. Neither location invokes thoughts of roses for me. I will have to pursue this thinking at some point.

As we enter July and roses begin to peak, I can’t help but look at them and think back on our backyard gardens, carefully sculpted, flowing, planned to be in bloom throughout the summer. Of course, the  sight and fragrance of the roses dominated the warm summer days, lounging on the patio and gazing across their labours.

Ah, I took this all for granted as a child and now appreciate those gentle memories that bring me back to simpler times of family, childhood, love and the sweet fragrance of summer. For that, and many other things I thank them, and miss them deeply.

Nikon D800
Schneider-Kreuznach Exida-Xenon 50mm f/1.9 @ 50mm (14mm extension tube)

1/60 sec, f/1.9, ISO 4000

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

The memory that really stands out for me, and the topic of this post is the roses they grew. I have no idea of the specific varieties planted, I  did not acquire their gift for roses.