Tag Archives: coneflower

“Yellow Coneflower – Ratibita pinnata”

“Yellow Coneflower - Ratibita pinnata”

“Some painters transform the sun into a yellow spot, others transform a yellow spot into the sun. “
– Pablo Picasso

The Yellow Coneflowers literally quiver in the slight breeze, their delicate petals, like small yellow rags, seem to barely hang on.

Such is the scene in a local field, where Yellow Coneflowers are common. Even the gentle breeze of a hot summer day create movement in these flowers. It’s very nice to look at, but proves a challenge to photograph. Thus, I made the decision to harvest a blossom for the studio.

It was an opportunity to really look deep into the structures that make up this delicate summer blossom, from the tender yellow petals to the complex structure of the ‘cone’ from which the plant takes its name.

It was a bit of a tough shot to light, the petals so bright and the details of the cone, lost in shadow, yet it turned out alright and drew my attention to the small green frills, known as ‘sepals’ through which the petals emerge. The things we don’t notice, show up in the right light.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/36.0, ISO 100

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Summer’s Splendour”

“Summer’s Splendour”

“Happiness is not a thing – it is a feeling; a way of joyful living and being. It comes from inner fulfilment and appreciating the world you live in.” 
― Rasheed Ogunlaru

I could not think of a more suitable title for this studio image of a purple coneflower from my garden. As I look at the flow of the petals and the incredible order of the disk florets, glowing in the light.

It’s something almost magical to behold and I find the isolation technique I use makes those details stand out even more. I’ve spent quite a bit of time with this image, simply enjoying the textures and structures of this beautiful blossom, dotted with tiny grains of pollen. Appreciating the whole by observing the component parts that make up the whole.

I’m finding these images and the time I spend composing the shots has made me more aware of many of these details as I observe the flowers and wildlife outdoors even more deliberately. I try to turn off the filters my brain has learned over the years, to see the blossom like this, naturally.

It’s becoming a journey to live life in the same manner. Some call it mindfulness, or living in the moment. I like to look at it is deliberate appreciation for the world around me. It’s also making it easier for me to compose better images, as I’m learning to see things for more than just an object to be photographed, but rather, an opportunity to preserve the essence of what I’m seeing. Writing about these experiences is helping tremendously, as the process of writing slows my brain down and causes me to more carefully consider the image and what I want to share about it and the process that led to its creation.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/200 sec, f/16.0 ISO 200

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Purple Coneflower”

“Purple Coneflower”

“Scars are not signs of weakness, they are signs of survival and endurance.” 
― Rodney A. Winters

As a continuation to yesterday’s post “Beginnings“, here’s a mature coneflower blossom. I struggled for a title for this and fell back to just the name of the plant. The intent was to come up with a name for the image that reflected the character of the plant.

As those who follow my blog regularly would know, we have had a series of strong storms in the area over the past few weeks, including strong winds and pea-sized hail. The coneflowers have withstood them all. Though a bit weather-worn, the blossoms are still quite nice, though I had to bypass a few which showed considerable damage before settling on this one.

In creating the image, I decided to show the entire plant, not just the blossom, as there is an abundance of close-up coneflower photos out there right now. I wanted to do something a bit different.

The next two days are threatening rain and thunderstorms so I am hoping to collect a few garden specimens to photograph before they too are damaged.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1.3  sec, f/32.0 ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Beginnings”

“Beginnings”

“Maybe I don’t have enough beginnings in my life because I fought against the endings that were about to birth those beginnings.” 
― Craig D. Lounsbrough

As I surveyed my gardens this morning, I noticed that several of my purple cone flowers were already in full bloom, a nice change from last year when heat and drought caused them to put out very small, underdeveloped flowers, just big enough to produce some scant seed.

The flowers and even the stems this year are quite large, though some of the larger flowers are showing some hail damage from a few weeks back. There are, however, several large blossoms beginning to form into flowers. They are quite pretty in their underdeveloped state and catch the light nicely.

I’ve left this one in its natural state, including the many spider threads between the petals. It seems every flower has its resident spider, but this one seems to have temporarily vacated the premises. I like this ‘natural’ look, including the webs as it documents all the detail we often miss from a distance or first glance, a recurring theme for me lately.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1.3  sec, f/32.0 ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Purple Coneflower”

 

"Purple Coneflower"“If people refuse to look at you in a new light and they can only see you for what you were, only see you for the mistakes you’ve made, if they don’t realize that you are not your mistakes, then they have to go.”
― Steve Maraboli

I may just start a series called “Common Flowers in a Different Light”. Since I started experimenting with this studio technique, I’ve found myself going to the garden and harvesting some of the more common flowers to photograph. As I look through my viewfinder to compose the shots, I’m actually awestruck at how the blossoms transform from plain to spectacular. This is not a boast but a feeling I have as a ‘vision’ is realized. That such a transformation can be accomplished by the correct application of light is where I want my photography to evolve.

There seem to be very distinct phases in photography that anyone serious in the art go through. I’ve looked at many 500px galleries and watched artists grow here on WordPress as they push the next limit and suddenly the images are taken up a notch.

I’m hoping that’s the case for me, and if not, then at least I am enjoying the journey.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/40 sec, f/14.0, ISO 6400

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com