Tag Archives: coral

“Coral Frills”

“Coral Frills”

“Dream in colours, for hues are vibrant.
Paint each day with a smile.
In days of past, don’t grieve;
Make new deposit to the pleasant memory bank!
Let your life be a reason for others to LIVE.”
― Somya Kedia

Once more, the effects of the black background surprised me.

When I selected this carnation from a bouquet, I did so because I saw some potential for a very ‘punchy’ image. The carnation, on observation, had a nice blend of coral shades and a very satiny texture.

As it turned out, they presented themselves in a very dramatic way under studio lights, further enhanced by the black background.  The swirl of colour seems to almost have movement to it. It certainly is nice to be able to preserve these images for future enjoyment as the carnation was part of a bouquet my children gave to my wife in celebration of her recent birthday.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/45.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

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“Coral Tulip”

“Coral Tulip”

“Gardening is akin to writing stories. No experience could have taught me more about grief or flowers, about achieving survival by going, your fingers in the ground, the limit of physical exhaustion.”
― Eudora Welty

Here’s another addition to my collection of spring flowers from the garden. It’s becoming a bit of a series that I’m considering naming “Facing the Flowers”.

This particular tulip came, as many of our flowers of late have, from my mother-in-law’s garden. When she downsized a few years ago, she could not bear the thought of leaving the plants she had tended for so many years behind. So, we made space and filled our gardens with her treasures. Now, all her work continues to yield wonderful flowers and she enjoys stopping by to see them.

She’ll be ninety-two years old this year and is past her gardening days, but still likes to offer some pointers on what worked best for her when it come to specific varieties. It’s also nice to drop off some cut flowers to her condo, so she can enjoy then at home.

Back to this tulip. It’s a bit of a unique specimen, in its shape and nature. The blossoms had opened up fully a few days ago, but by the time I had the time to photograph them, they had closed back up again, and remained that way for several days. Until yesterday, when they finally saw sunshine and decided to make another show. I took a cutting and brought it inside to my studio for a few photos. Then, I placed it in a vase with a few other flowers. The next time I checked it, it was closed again and has remained so all day. It would appear this is a sunshine only tulip. Based on the forecast of three solid days of rain, I guess I can’t blame it.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
3.0 sec, f/36.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Coral Geranium”

“Coral Geranium”

“Everyday gratitude sweetens what appears flavorless and brightens all that appears dim.”
― Amy Leigh Mercree

The floral photography adventure continues. As I keep making these images, I’m trying a few different techniques. In this instance, the blossoms were at the end of a long stalk. Including the stalk lengthwise made the photo, and the plant itself look awkward. So, I spun the plant around and photographed it end-on.

A further challenge with this angle was trying to show the entire flower in focus and bright while allowing the light to gradually fall off, so that the blossom appears to be coming from the darkness. The challenge here is that the blossoms are very bright and the leaves quite dark. I’m also getting used to a newly acquired macro lense, which gives me far more aperture flexibility than my previous extension tube setup.

To get the entire blossom in focus, as well as most of the leaves required a very narrow aperture of f/29, but since I had abundant light, I was able to keep the shutter speed a bit faster at 1/4 sec. Still learning, but enjoying the journey.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
0.4 sec, f/29.0, ISO 200

Hi Resolution image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Coral Gerbera”

“Coral Gerbera”

“Always be friendly, always be kind,
Like the most beautiful flower that you can find.”
― Debasish Mridha

This image is a switch back to some of my earlier floral images. I went back through older images that I have not had the opportunity to edit  and found this one of a gerbera that was part of a larger floral arrangement.

I had a hard time with this one, as the coral colour is tough to reproduce to my satisfaction. So, like many images, I return to it once more, hoping to extract the image I had envisioned when I made it. A different day, a different eye, and the results now please me enough to share it. I’m hoping to do a bit more studio work over the winter months, it will help brighten the days for me, and hopefully, those who follow my blog.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/22.0, ISO 400

Hi Resolution image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Wild Columbine” – Marble Lake, Bancroft

“Wild Columbines” - Marble Lake, Bancroft

“The columbine and iris bowed down to make way for bolder sprays of red valerian, and a mingled profusion of clustered Canterbury bells and sweet william, pale blues and pinks intertwined, danced at the feet of more stately spears of deep-purple foxglove and monkshood.” 
― Susanna Kearsley

On the trend of pinks and pastels, yet another beautiful native spring flower, the Wild Columbine (aquilegia canadensis), is found on rocky outcrops in the Bancroft, Ontario area among emerging ferns, jack-in-the-pulpit, and a few late trilliums. I really enjoy finding these little jewels on my walks in the woods. A little splash of coral catches my eye, then another. They seem to favour cracks in the rock over flat soil. They are such delicate plants and seem almost fragile compared to their thick stemmed and fibrous companions.

The only shortcoming of getting out to enjoy these lovely wildflowers is the ever present company of black flies, the bane of Canadian forests in spring time. However, based on the very warm weekend we just had here, they should be gone in short measure and their associates, the mosquitoes, will take their place in the stinging insect category.

Nikon D800
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/60 sec, f/2.8, ISO 500

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com