Tag Archives: creativity

“Thaw”

“Thaw”

“As winter releases its grip, memories of warmer are revealed”
– Ed Lehming 

I’ve spent a lot of time recently walking around my town. Primarily due to convenience and partly because the late winter forests have been fairly uninspiring. I’m always looking for unusual things that might make for an interesting photo.

Many times, I will see something that catches my eye and I spend more time observing the scene or object, trying to understand why it stood out. I also see things as they may be. What I mean by that is that I use a bit of an impressionist’s eye to extract more than just the object itself.

Here, I came across a boulder emerging from the ice along the path that I was walking on. The way the light played on the ice, and a bit on the rock, made for an interesting composition.

I’ve also started to paint, so I’m looking for subjects that may lend themselves to this treatment. Often I’m not sure exactly how I may create a painting, but have the advantage of several plug-ins that allow me to ‘play’ with the image to form my final approach.

That’s what I did here. I took the photo from my iPhone and applied a few filters to get me to where I want to go with an eventual painting.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4 mm
1/15 sec; f/1.8; ISO 1600

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Advertisements

“Rusty Shores”

 

“Beneath the rust and grime which dulls the shine of our weathered hearts, joy patiently waits to be rediscovered” 
― John Mark Green

For my photography, image titles often come quite easily. As I venture into the world of acrylic painting, I’m finding that that’s not the case. Perhaps it’s the extended creation process, where I am spending a longer period of time creating the art itself?

Photos come naturally to me. I see a scene before me that is interesting, compose the image, set lighting, exposure and depth of field, and voila! I have a photo that I am generally pleased with.

The same holds true with painting. There is a lot of thought that goes into the process that I had not considered until I started painting a few short years ago and I have not been doing much lately. But now, I have taken a course and understand that the creative process is very similar and all the elements that make a good photo also hold true for painting.

I’ve always enjoyed impressionist paintings and have striven for that same feel with my photos. Now, I’m trying to merge the two, simply to stay creative, especially in winter months where outdoor activity can be quite limited. So, I’ve pushed myself a bit, trying to add some texture to my work by doing an entire painting with a palette knife, way out of my comfort zone, but so very satisfying.

Once again, I remind myself this is my photo blog, but I think that painting is helping me in my creative process for photography and this is, after all, a photo of a painting.

“Red Canna Lily”

"Canna Lily"

“The single greatest lesson the garden teaches is that our relationship to the planet need not be zero-sum, and that as long as the sun still shines and people still can plan and plant, think and do, we can, if we bother to try, find ways to provide for ourselves without diminishing the world. ”
― Michael Pollan

This specimen came from my flower beds. In fact, this was the first blossom all year, driven by the drought we are experiencing here. I had intended to use my portable outdoor setup, rather than taking a cutting. Since I tend to shoot these at f/10 or higher, the setup also requires a fairly low shutter speed, around 1/10 second. Thus, even a slight movement causes problems in clarity. It’s been a bit breezy here lately and I wanted to capture the blossom before it fades, which happens fairly quickly. Thus I made the decision to cut it and bring it indoors to photograph.

I found the bright red blossoms a challenge in previous attempts to photograph the. Using the studio light ing and paying careful attention to depth of field and contrast, I think I was able to create a nice representation  of the blossoms without the red tones bleeding together which was my previous experience.

All in all, this is my most challenging flower shot yet, using this method and I’m pleased with the outcome.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/10 sec, f/11.0, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Single Day Lily”


“Once in awhile, you pick the right thing, the exact best thing. Every day, the moment you open your eyes and pull off your blankets, that’s what you hope for. The sunshine on your face,warm enough to make your heart sing.”
― Sarah Ockler

One of my first attempts at this technique involved bringing a daylily cutting into my studio and experimenting with lighting and camera settings. I was so pleased with the results that I have continued using it for many different blossoms and, as those following my blog know, I have created a portable backdrop that I can take with me in the field.

Yesterday, I was experimenting with it in my backyard gardens, when I noticed this stray blossom that had poked through the fence from my neighbour’s yard. Recalling how pleased I was with my first daylily, I set up quickly and made this image. It was made with natural light in one attempt. I’m feeling inspired by the simplicity of it and how stunning the results can be.

When I look at the images a actually have to remind myself that I made them and I smile. It’s so satisfying to the creative in me.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200mm
1/20 sec, f/10.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“White Cosmos”

“White Cosmos”

“To be creative means to be in love with life. You can be creative only if you love life enough that you want to enhance its beauty, you want to bring a little more music to it, a little more poetry to it, a little more dance to it.”
― Osho

Now at number five in this series, it may be time for me to take a short departure from this and get outside.

I’m really enjoying this foray into the world of studio photography. It drives the creativity in me to a new level. Being able to take the common and transform it into something more gives me a sense of satisfaction. There is something about plants and flowers that resonates in me. Perhaps it’s the almost miraculous details that you see when you take the time to really observe them. They calm me, somehow, as I look at them, appreciating the lines, the texture, and complexity of even the most commonplace flower.

I’m taking a few days of much needed vacation to get up north, recharge, and, of course, make some more photos. The days are forecast to be hot and humid, so there’s a really good chance I will be near water. Perhaps a lake or a waterfall?

There are several waterfalls, rather, chutes, in the area where my camper sits and a visit to capture some of that raw beauty is in order.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/140 sec, f/14.0, ISO 6400

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Pink Clematis”

“Pink Clematis”

“The trick to forgetting the big picture is to look at everything close-up. The shortcut to closing a door is to bury yourself in the details. This is how we must look to God. As if everything’s just fine.”
― Chuck Palahniuk

Image number three in what has become my “Ordinary Flowers in a Different Light” series. Interestingly enough, this was a single blossom on one of my finicky clematis plants. They are strange in their blooming patterns. Some opening in May, while others have gone into November.

While the blossom is quite pretty, it tends to be a go-to garden plant and thus it’s been included in my “Ordinary Flowers” collection.

This studio photography experiment is quite enjoyable and is not something I saw myself gravitating towards. However, I do like the fine details this technique shows and really allows the plant to show off, as it were, without competing with their garden companions.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 140 mm
1/100 sec, f/14.0, ISO 6400

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com