Tag Archives: cycle

“Bounty Awaits”

“Bounty Awaits”“When I see a dancing butterfly,
When I see a half blooming flower,
Their eager wish to make this world happy,
My mind dances with joy,
My soul emerges in happiness.”
― Debasish Mridha

The temperatures continue to warm, rain falls, off and on, and the cycle continues. New growth seems to accelerate. What was a mere bud a few days ago, now begins to show hints of its future form.

This flower cluster, which a photographed four days ago, has opened up even more. I’m still waiting to see the leaves a bit larger to assist in identifying what this flowering shrub is. I have to admit, looking at this process close up, through a macro lens, is very interesting. The forest was also quite a bit brighter this day and I was able to ease up a bit on the ISO settings. Here’s the previous image, if you missed my earlier post.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/80 sec, f/4.5, ISO 200

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“Trilliums & Log” – Stouffville Reservoir Trail

“Trilliums & Log” - Stouffville Reservoir Trail

“If you want a happy ending, it just depends on where you close the book!”
― Orson Welles

A final image of trilliums for the season. This has been a fine year for them. Moderately warm days brought on a slow bloom and cool nights preserved the delicate blossoms. As I roamed the forest a few days ago, I could not help but make a few more images to look back on later in the year. This pair, with the dead log in the background, offered a nice composition and good light. Now the season progresses and other subjects await.

Nikon D800
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/200 sec, f/7.1, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Basswood Emerging” – Stouffville Reservoir

“Basswood Emerging” - Stouffville Reservoir

“Art is unquestionably one of the purest and highest elements in human happiness. It trains the mind through the eye, and the eye through the mind. As the sun colors flowers, so does art color life.”
― John Lubbock

The wonder of spring, as the forest explodes in greens and yellows, never fails to impress me. Tiny buds burst open and within days, full sized leaves adorn the branch. What I like most is how pure and unblemished these new leaves are. They glow with health, but only for a few days and the cycle towards the inevitable winter begins again.

So, I drink it in while it lasts and I save these moments, in photographs, to enjoy at times when I need to be reminded that the cycle will repeat.

Nikon D800
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/200 sec, f/7.1, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Forest Floor Companions”

“Forest Floor Companions”

“I am learning my way toward something that will make sense of my life, and I learn by going where I have to go, with whatever companions I am graced.” 
― Dean Koontz

At the base of a dead beech tree, these companions add brightness and life, among the dead and decomposing elements surrounding them.

For some unknown reason, the large beech trees in this local forest all died a few years ago. Many of them are very large and old, so it may just be a cycle, as there are many younger trees thriving in the same area. The die-off started a few years back and most of the elders are gone now, the bark peeling off their massive trunks,  branches falling to the ground with every passing winter. I also suspect a new housing development nearby may have altered the water table, ever so slightly, as to affect the older trees. The forest seems a bit ‘wetter’ than usual.

Yet, among all this death, spring offers her bounty of fresh life, in the form of wildflowers, growing in abundance at the base of these dead trees. There are Spring Beauties (Claytonia virginica), also known by some as May Flowers or Fairy Spuds (the roots and flowers are edible), with their bright pink faces and delicate stems. Then there are also Trout Lilies with their mottled leaves and bright yellow flowers. Mixed in among them, though not pictured here are red and white trilliums, to name the most predominant in my area. It seems every year there are more, which is wonderful to see.

To think a few short years ago I would walk these same trails and never notice anything but the white trilliums. There is something to be said for slowing down and just looking. It’s amazing what we can see, if we take the time.

Nikon D800
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Orange Dragonfly” – Stouffville Reservoir

“Orange Dragonfly” - Stouffville Reservoir

You know it’s going to be an awesome summer when full-grown dragonflies are out and about in May to eat those pesky mosquitoes and blackflies.

This year’s super warm May (so far) certainly has changed or accelerated some of the usual patterns around here, As I walk around, I see fresh leaves emerging from trees and shrub, birds in their nests, and a wonderful growth of wildflowers. I’ve seen a few dragonflies in the past day and realized it’s quite early to see this many.

Well, here’s hoping this is a good sign.

I have not seen an orange one like this around. Most are blue or black, so I’ll have to look this species up. That aside, I was very pleased at how the orange background just enhances this photo.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 300 mm
1/125 sec @ f/5.6, ISO 250