Tag Archives: cycles

“Any Day Now…”

“Any Day Now...”

“Nature knows. Nature understands the cycles and adjusts.” – Ed Lehming

I was out last Sunday, Mothers Day, hoping to see even one or two open White Trilliums, that was not to be on that chilly, sleet filled day. It felt more like March than May and was in sharp contrast to the previous Sunday which was mild and sunny. Last week was filled with so much promise and so many spring flowers had begun to bloom as trilliums sat seemingly ready to open too.

If I pay attention, really pay attention, to the natural signs around me, I know there will be a delay, regardless of what I hope for and how nice a particular day may seem. The ferns are still in tight ‘knuckles’, not yet at the fiddlehead stage, and trees were in bud, but not leafing out yet. It’s a sure sign that frosty days are still coming, as these plants would be susceptible to frost damage of they opened too soon. Yes, the cycles continue, but the timing varies, nature knows and plants will not rush to open, knowing they will sustain irreparable damage. We as humans can learn a lot from them if we actually pay attention.

That said, the trilliums really are set to open soon. I this image the petals of the flower are clearly visible, but still tightly bundled to protect the petals from frost damage. I’ve suer they will fairly explode in the next few days as the temperatures warm up and remain warm, even overnight.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1/250 sec, f/8.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Dry Ground and Spring Warmth”

“Dry Ground and Spring Warmth”

“The cycle continues, winter leads to spring and the ground drinks in the warmth of the brightening sunshine. Traces of winter remain as distant memories” – Ed Lehming

Nowadays I’m even more appreciative of the beautiful outdoor spaces so close to home. It also helps that the snow and ice is gradually receding. Not gone,as there were some quite treacherous stretches that made me happy to have my ‘icers’ on.

But, there were several clear stretches of open, leaf-covered ground and even a few hearty sedges beginning to peer through. It won’t be long till spring is in full swing.

It is so different this year though. With all the focus on COVID-19 and “social distancing” some of the anticipated joy of spring is missing. On reflection, the only real difference is in my perception. Driving to the trailhead, I’m feeling a bit apprehensive. Am I doing the right thing by venturing out? I get to the trailhead and there are a disproportionate number of cars for this time of year. Clearly, I’m not the only one who needed to get outdoors. As I start my hike, I notice very few tracks and when I get to the first icy section, the sparse footprint turn back; I realize that these are not the true ‘hikers’, simply people wanting to be outside, with no intention of entering the formal trail system. They are just looking around, likely unfamiliar with this area.

During my five kilometer hike, I meet one other person, heading the other direction. WE exchange a brief hello in passing and continue on our way. Each enjoying some quiet time in nature and watching the earth continue it’s cycles, oblivious to what’s happening in the human world.

As I emerge from the trail, refreshed and a few new photos on my camera, the trailhead is still crammed with cars, but nobody in sight. A good day to recharge.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/32, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Life Goes On”

“Life Goes On”

“Nature is filled with cycles, as one thing passes from this world, another is ready to take its place. Each eager for it’s time in the sun”
– Ed Lehming

I find myself returning to this place frequently, primarily because of the stark contrasts i find here. The hillside is filled with several standing dead pine trees. By the bleached look of them and the deterioration of the bark, I’d say they have been dead for some time now. They stand in contrast to the rest of the lush vegetation that surrounds them eager to take their place.

At this particular time of year, the hillside is filled with young birches, their leaves turned a bright autumnal yellow. They seem so alive, even though we are well into fall. They seem even more vibrant as a backdrop to their deceased neighbours.

As my quote says, “Life Goes On”, the cycle of life continues, the weak and aged fade, but are not soon forgotten. some have broken or fallen down, and I will miss them when they are gone. This scene would not be the same without them.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Final Traces?”

“Final Traces?”

“Memory serves to remind us of the cycles we live in. Nothing is permanent, ever repeating; familiar, yet never quite the same.”
– Ed Lehming

As spring slowly takes hold, traces of winter still linger in the shadows and low places of the forest, a reminder of the days gone by. Yet, the warming air brings forth the promise of a new season, in yellows, browns, and greens, as the sun touches the ground once more.

The trails, though melting quickly this past weekend were still largely ice covered and treacherous and I found myself dealing with a mix of mud and ice which meant tricky footing, despite my wearing crampons.

I’m hoping by next week to see life returning among the winter detritus and a bit of greenery. For now, it’s a waiting game, but all the signs are right for things to pop soon.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Potential”

“Potential”

“To focus solely on endings is to trade conclusions for the very beginnings that created them. And if this cycle should persist, we will likewise miss the beginning that will follow this ending.” 
― Craig D. Lounsbrough

This year concludes, as it began, with a simple image of a hemlock cone. This was not intentional on my part, it’s simply how things work sometimes. It’s a different tree, in a different forest, three hundred and sixty five days apart.

The year for me as a photographer, artist, father, husband, and human has been wonderful. As I look back on that photo from January the first of this year, I had no idea where life was taking me. I’ve grown in my skill and resolve on so many levels and that tiny seed seems an appropriate symbol to reflect on. This diminutive seed has the potential to become a massive and wonderful tree, if the elements are correct, producing seeds of its own. So, as the year concludes, or rather, cycles into the next, I look forward to the potential outcomes and many more experiences which add to my life.

See you all next year!

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm

1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Crimson Splash” 

“Crimson Splash”

“It is always the simple that produces the marvelous. “
– Amelia Barr

Though fairly similar to my “Autumn Creeps In” image, this one is different enough to stand on its own. The autumn leaves of the Red Maple fairly glow among the thin shimmering veil of pine needles and their pale greens and oranges. It’s late summer, the last weekend of summer and it’s hot, really hot as a late season heat wave exerts itself on the forest.

I suppose that’s why the green undergrowth is so lush, deep green and thriving. It’s quite a contrast between summer and autumn in one place. There is life here, cycles of life and never ending change. Even the reds and greens, speak of stop and go. The very nature of nature, at the Papineau Bend, and lovely little park carved from the forest along the banks of Papineau Creek.

These scenes of healthy nature are nourishing for me to reflect on. I imagine myself standing in this place and time, making photos and loving just existing here. Perhaps images to carry me through the upcoming winter, which, while beautiful in its own way, pales in comparison to a green and thriving late summer forest.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Air Traffic”

"Air Traffic"

“He imagines a necessary joy in things that must fly to eat.”
― Wendell Berry

A final look at this fleabane plant and accompanying wildlife. The Crescent butterfly, now satisfied, flies off to its next destination, while a small bee arrives to repeat the cycle.

I like the movement in this image. It nicely illustrates the activity that goes on, even around a single plant, all day long. Each visitor, in its turn, partaking of what the plant has to offer; in return, the plant sends its pollen along to neighbouring plants, a hitchhiker tagging along with the hungry visitors, anther cycle. It’s quite a thing to watch, and much of it is missed, since the smaller flies and bees are so small and fast, that they are merely blurs to the naked eye, frozen here, to enjoy and wonder at.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/500sec, f/7.1 ISO 400

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com