Tag Archives: cycles

“Final Traces?”

“Final Traces?”

“Memory serves to remind us of the cycles we live in. Nothing is permanent, ever repeating; familiar, yet never quite the same.”
– Ed Lehming

As spring slowly takes hold, traces of winter still linger in the shadows and low places of the forest, a reminder of the days gone by. Yet, the warming air brings forth the promise of a new season, in yellows, browns, and greens, as the sun touches the ground once more.

The trails, though melting quickly this past weekend were still largely ice covered and treacherous and I found myself dealing with a mix of mud and ice which meant tricky footing, despite my wearing crampons.

I’m hoping by next week to see life returning among the winter detritus and a bit of greenery. For now, it’s a waiting game, but all the signs are right for things to pop soon.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Potential”

“Potential”

“To focus solely on endings is to trade conclusions for the very beginnings that created them. And if this cycle should persist, we will likewise miss the beginning that will follow this ending.” 
― Craig D. Lounsbrough

This year concludes, as it began, with a simple image of a hemlock cone. This was not intentional on my part, it’s simply how things work sometimes. It’s a different tree, in a different forest, three hundred and sixty five days apart.

The year for me as a photographer, artist, father, husband, and human has been wonderful. As I look back on that photo from January the first of this year, I had no idea where life was taking me. I’ve grown in my skill and resolve on so many levels and that tiny seed seems an appropriate symbol to reflect on. This diminutive seed has the potential to become a massive and wonderful tree, if the elements are correct, producing seeds of its own. So, as the year concludes, or rather, cycles into the next, I look forward to the potential outcomes and many more experiences which add to my life.

See you all next year!

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm

1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Crimson Splash” 

“Crimson Splash”

“It is always the simple that produces the marvelous. “
– Amelia Barr

Though fairly similar to my “Autumn Creeps In” image, this one is different enough to stand on its own. The autumn leaves of the Red Maple fairly glow among the thin shimmering veil of pine needles and their pale greens and oranges. It’s late summer, the last weekend of summer and it’s hot, really hot as a late season heat wave exerts itself on the forest.

I suppose that’s why the green undergrowth is so lush, deep green and thriving. It’s quite a contrast between summer and autumn in one place. There is life here, cycles of life and never ending change. Even the reds and greens, speak of stop and go. The very nature of nature, at the Papineau Bend, and lovely little park carved from the forest along the banks of Papineau Creek.

These scenes of healthy nature are nourishing for me to reflect on. I imagine myself standing in this place and time, making photos and loving just existing here. Perhaps images to carry me through the upcoming winter, which, while beautiful in its own way, pales in comparison to a green and thriving late summer forest.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Air Traffic”

"Air Traffic"

“He imagines a necessary joy in things that must fly to eat.”
― Wendell Berry

A final look at this fleabane plant and accompanying wildlife. The Crescent butterfly, now satisfied, flies off to its next destination, while a small bee arrives to repeat the cycle.

I like the movement in this image. It nicely illustrates the activity that goes on, even around a single plant, all day long. Each visitor, in its turn, partaking of what the plant has to offer; in return, the plant sends its pollen along to neighbouring plants, a hitchhiker tagging along with the hungry visitors, anther cycle. It’s quite a thing to watch, and much of it is missed, since the smaller flies and bees are so small and fast, that they are merely blurs to the naked eye, frozen here, to enjoy and wonder at.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/500sec, f/7.1 ISO 400

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“First Coltsfoot of the Season”

“First Coltsfoot of the Season”

“When you know that something’s going to happen, you’ll start trying to see signs of its approach in just about everything. Always try to remember that most of the things that happen in this world aren’t signs. They happen because they happen, and their only real significance lies in normal cause and effect. You’ll drive yourself crazy if you start trying to pry the meaning out of every gust of wind or rain squall. I’m not denying that there might actually be a few signs that you won’t want to miss. Knowing the difference is the tricky part.”
― David Eddings

I was not planning a second post for today, but decided to share an important plant for me. The Coltsfoot, is always the first native plant to bloom in my area. It’s blossoms signal the beginning of many natural cycles. Once I see them, I can begin looking for other emerging plants like wild leeks (ramps), blue cohosh, and spring beauties. They also signal, and I’m not sure how this works, other than probably something to do with ambient temperatures, the beginning of the annual rainbow trout spawn.

So, when I saw the first little splash of yellow (yes, yellow has returned), and knowing these are not dandelions, though they are often mistaken for them, I grabbed my camera gear and hit the trails around Duffins Creek to see how the trout were doing.

Though they were not numerous and the water was still a bit murky from the runoff, I did see a few dark shapes beneath the water. The spawn is on! I’m looking forward to watching this spectacle once more, and hopefully, making some nice images to share here over the next few weeks.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/640sec, f/10.0, ISO 800

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Forest Floor Colours”

“Everything turns in circles and spirals with the cosmic heart until infinity. Everything has a vibration that spirals inward or outward — and everything turns together in the same direction at the same time. This vibration keeps going: it becomes born and expands or closes and destructs — only to repeat the cycle again in opposite current. Like a lotus, it opens or closes, dies and is born again. Such is also the story of the sun and moon, of me and you. Nothing truly dies. All energy simply transforms.”
― Suzy Kassem

Back at a computer after a week of travel, and time to add some context to my simplified posts of late.

The image above was taken on a whim. Autumn was just approaching and a few leaves had made an early descent to the forest floor, still littered with last years’ remnants and several green plants. The contrast between the dry gray leaves from last year, the newly fallen, and the still growing plants told the story of continuous cycle in the forest, made more noticeable to me by the bright colours, randomly scattered.

iPhone 5s back camera @ 4.2mm
1/30 sec;   f/2.2;   ISO 125

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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http://www.edlehming.com

“First of the Season” – Stouffville Reservoir Trail

“First of the Season” - Stouffville Reservoir Trail

“Is the spring coming?” he said. “What is it like?”…
“It is the sun shining on the rain and the rain falling on the sunshine…” 
― Frances Hodgson Burnett

Interestingly enough, despite the cold April we experienced in my neck of the woods, the first white trillium blossom I found, appeared exactly to the date of last year’s. I though for certain that it would be a full week behind, but this beauty, and her companions, waiting to open up in the next day or two, are right on time. There’s no stopping the natural cycle.

In fact, I think this may even be the same plant that bloomed first, last year. The conditions must be just right in this particular patch, as the whole group of them is slightly advanced.

Nikon D800
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com