Tag Archives: dead

“Better Days”

“Better Days”

“There are times in our lives when we have to realize our past is precisely what it is, and we cannot change it. But we can change the story we tell ourselves about it, and by doing that, we can change the future.”
― Eleanor Brown

As I was making images of the flowers from a recently purchased bouquet, I realized that I had saved a dried rose back in the fall. It was sitting on a bench in my studio but I had not figured out how I wanted to present it.

I had made another image that day, involving a coffee cup and biscotti titled “Taking a Break”. The shot involved a wooden charcuterie board, which my wife had given me at Christmas. The wooden board seemed like a nice background for the rose. After adjusting it a few times and playing with the lighting to minimize shadows, this is the result, simply titled “Better Days”, since the rose has certainly had them. The title, which came readily, prompts me to reflect deeply on the image created. It is significant.

To think back on the past occasions where a flower was given as a gesture of love, friendship, a bond and how some of those relationships may have represent better days, others, have not. Yet, they cannot be so easily discarded and within what remains there is some trace of the beauty they once symbolized, some future lesson to be realized?

Nikon D800
Nikor 24-70mm f/3.5-4.6 @ @ 35 mm (with 20mm extension tube)
2.0 sec, f/25.0, ISO 100

Hi Resolution image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Dead Maple on Reesor Road?” – Markham , Ontario

Dead Maple on Reesor Road

“Look at all the things around you, the immediate world around you. If you are alive, it will mean something to you, and if you care enough about photography, and if you know how to use it, you will want to photograph that meaningness.” – Paul Strand

I am reminded daily that I live in a living world. That world envelops me, nourishes me, sustains me. My eye picks up on subtle colours, a movement, some minor thing that stands out and gets my attention. As the quote above states so eloquently, these things mean something to me. These everyday scenes that fill our days which most people seem to pass by with some ingrained disregard.

In our ever busy world, I feel blessed that those moments do have meaning to me and that I can see them as a critical part of my world and experience. I’ve deliberately set out to share that meaning as best I can, through learning to become a better photographer, to convey meaningness by sharing those experiences here through images and words. My goal is to improve my ability and skills as a photographer, artist, and writer so that some of the meaning, richness, and joy that I take for my experiences can have similar meaning to others.

The image above was made a few years ago as I was driving home from an errand in a nearby town. It was a cold day in early January and the wind-whipped snow swirled in the fields like it was a living thing trying to escape the confines of the snowbanks.Most of the roadside grasses were already encased in a thick winter blanket, while a few hearty reeds bent in the wind. Among all this movement, a solitary maple, more dead than living, stood firmly and weathered the onslaught. Once more, when looking closely at what appeared to me, and was titled that way, as a dead tree, is still showing signs of life in a few of its branches, reminding me to be a better observer by slowing down and really understanding what I’m looking at.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 112 mm
1/200 sec, F/7.1, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Bright December Seedheads” – Seaton Hiking Trail

“Bright December Seedheads” - Seaton Hiking Trail, Whitevale

Time for some brightness in this dull December. After numerous drab, but mild days, the sun finally shone though, albeit for only a few hours. As I looked out my office window at the beautiful warm glow, I decided my lunchtime would be spent on a trail. So, I packed my gear and headed off to the woods.

It’s such a wonderful benefit having all these woodlands so close by that I can step out to recharge without an extended drive.

Today’s all too brief hike took me down the Seaton Trail, just south of Whitevale, Ontario. As I started my walk, the sun was still shining, though it was a bit cooler than expected.

The nice thing about the sun this time of year is that it tends to be more indirect and softer, and it was late enough in the day to bring out the beautiful gold hues in the surrounding fields and meadows. It also afforded the opportunity to shot this scene of dead flowerheads from several angles and choose my favourite. By looking at it, you’d never expect it was made in the second week of December, in Canada. It’s also a nice thought that beauty can come from something that has died, at least on the surface. I hope this image brings some warm to you as well.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200mm
1/100 sec @ f/5.0 -0.33, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website
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“Past Beauty” – Dead Flowerheads, Wendat Pond, Stouffville

“Past Beauty” - Dead Flowerheads, Wendat Pond, Stouffville

I made this photo a few days ago while on an evening  walk. The light was just softening and I found the dead stems an interesting subject, considering the world around is greening up with the first few truly mild days.

These are old flower heads from wildflowers growing around Wendat Pond. The pond was named after a large native city that was found to have been located in this area. For me, it’s a nice place to walk and consider what it may have looked like a few centuries ago. Did those early people look at things the way I do?

To make this photo, I took advantage of the soft light and a depth of field just narrow enough to keep the stems in focus while trying to isolate the flower heads from the background.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-2000 mm f/2.8 @ 175 mm
1/125 sec @ f/5.6, ISO 250