Tag Archives: decay

TUESDAYS OF TEXTURE | WEEK 15 OF 2017

“Bark and Lichen”

“Bark and Lichen”

Texture is the most enduring and ubiquitous underpinning of form… certainly a calming, meditative and appealing world for both the eye and mind.
– Lynda Lehmann

Here is my entry for Del Monte Y Mar’s Tuesdays of Texture Challenge Week 15 of 2017.

It’s a very simple composition, a dead branch next to the trail, some of the bark already shed, revealing yet more texture in the wood below. There’s also a bit of lichen growing on the remaining pieces of bark to add a small splash of colour.

I’m finding myself continually drawn to these forms, they are an interesting testament to the cycle of life in the forest, changing from one form to the next. Now that I have a good macro lens, I’m able to document these forms more effectively and enjoy them even more.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1/320 sec, f/10.0, ISO 800

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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Tuesdays of Texture – Week 13, 2017

“Eroded”“Eroded”

“In a decaying society, art, if it is truthful, must also reflect decay. And unless it wants to break faith with its social function, art must show the world as changeable. And help to change it.”
― Ernst Fischer

Here is my entry for Del Monte Y Mar’s Tuesdays of Texture Challenge Week 13 of 2017.

As I walked the streets of Todos Santos, Mexico a few brief weeks ago, enjoying the architecture, which is so different from home, I spotted this wall along one of the main streets.

It interested me immediately and I took the time to really look at it, to appreciate the textures and colours and create a mental story of the image. The exact location is a memory, but I could probably find it again.

What stood out at first, and what initially got my attention, was the deep reddish colour and grain of the exposed brick against, what at first, appeared to be a bright white wall. It was not till I looked closer that all the sub layers revealed themselves.

There’s the first layer of mortar, which holds the brick together and serves as an initial coating, then another layer of plaster, to smooth it out. That layer seems to have been painted a bright blue, and a subsequent layer of red, since weathered and coated with another layer of creamy adobe.

The crack exposes all these layers in a complex composition of colour and texture that just seems to work. Some may walk by and think it an eyesore, complaining that the building owner should repair it. But, there’s not much rain in this region and it will probably not be attended to for years to come. For some of us, a simple thing like a crack in a wall can become a world of its own, beauty in the mundane, and I’m happy to see it that way.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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Tuesdays of Texture – Week 2, 2017

“Study in Wood #6”

Here’s my contribution for this week’s  Tuesdays of Texture  over at de monte y mar.

Another image of a log, a part of my ongoing wood studies series, the log’s surface stripped bare by the elements, a light patina of moss forming on the smooth surface, as hemlock needles accumulate in a hollow. The blend of texture and colours make it appear, to me, like an abstract painting.

Nikon D300
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 82 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Dogwood Drama”

“Dogwood Drama”

“Life is pleasant. Death is peaceful. It’s the transition that’s troublesome.”
― Isaac Asimov

Something about fall that has always fascinated me is how slow decay, cooler temperatures, and a shorter period of daylight, can change a plant so dramatically.

Recently I came across this dogwood in a local forest. Almost all the leaves show signs of decay, being thoroughly spotted and in some case, even perforated by decay. Then there are the dramatic fuchsia leaves. I look at the companion leaves carefully and don’t see even a hint of that colour in them. It is quite dramatic, especially when the sun filters through the canopy, making the leaves glow.

Then, I think back on the same plant in early summer, leaves freshly formed and glowing green, not  a blemish to mar their beauty. They endure a lot through the summer and award us with this wonderful show of colour, with a few blemishes and scars to remind us that the summer can be harsh too.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 62mm
1/2 sec, f/20.0, ISO 400

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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Thursday Doors – August 04, 2016

“Abandoned Church” - Bruce County Road 40
 

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

OK, I’m cheating a bit today. This is a closer view of the door to a church I photographed last week and posted earlier today.

It looks like the doors, and the building, have seen better days and I wish I had spend a bit longer looking around and making some interior shots too. It was not till I started processing the image that I noticed the scuff mark on the door, Indicating the the lock has been removed at some time, allowing the locking bar to swing freely.

It’s pretty amazing what nature can do to unattended buildings. The yellow brick is typical in this area, being made from local clay, it takes on the yellow colour rather than the brick-red many of us are used to. There are many old buildings in the area in excellent condition, but without heat in the winter, the building rapidly declines, as frost gets between the bricks and mortar, splitting them apart. I’ve started looking through the county archives to get a bit of history of this unidentified church.

Nikon D300
Tamron 17-50 mm f/2.8 @ 31 mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Abandoned Church” – Bruce County Road 40

“Abandoned Church” - Bruce County Road 40

“The problem with churches of all sorts, is that so often they ignore the key teachings of the Sermon on the Mount, like the doctrine of love. So often we ask God to be on our side instead of asking that we be blessed enough to be on His. That said, the wheat and the tares must grow up together, and in the days of harvest they will be separated properly.”
― David Holdsworth

Another view from my Bruce County road trip and just down the road from the beautiful wheatfield that I photographed earlier.

When I drive past these abandoned buildings, I inevitably find myself asking, “What happened here?”

At some point in it’s history, this would have been an active local church. People would have gathered here on Sundays, met as friends and family, sat through a sermon, and worshipped. And then, suddenly, or gradually, attendance dwindled and the doors closed. Was there discord, did the leadership move away, or were other pastures greener? I’m curious why someone would leave a beautiful building like this to simply decay. What went through the mind of the person who turned off the lights and locked the door, for the last time? Did they ever envision this, or was there a hope to return on some future date?

At this point, I’d say, it’s beyond salvaging.

It sits, forlorn, along the roadside, it’s doors locked with a rusty chain and padlock, most of the glass fallen out of the windows, left to return to the elements. There’s no marker even identifying it. All that remains is a shell of what was and testament to what might have been.

Since posting this originally, I came across the history, if you are interested. It was the Williscroft Baptist Church and closed its doors in the 1960s as did the rest of the town.

Nikon D300
Tamron 17-50 mm f/2.8 @ 31 mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“A Shift in the Winds” – Stouffville Reservoir

“A Shift in the Winds” - Stouffville Reservoir

September, the month where some days convince you that summer will last for weeks, yet others are  stern reminders that change is inevitable. This holds true this year. After weeks of above average, sweltering days, the temperature plummets and we layer on hats and sweatshirts, wondering if this summer has passed us by.

The saving grace, for me is the gradual change of colours. The once verdant trees begin to shift to shades of orange and yellow. I do like the change and variety this time of year brings with it. I recall the days of new growth and flawless leaves. As I look around me now, those leaves are showing evidence of the hardships of days in sun and heat bring on. Edges are browned and shrivelled. Black spots of age dot the once pristine surfaces, leading to the inevitable fall.

Such was my walk today. The grove of poplars pictured above was a beautiful range of bright greens and yellows and the wind made them dance with life. Above me, a falcon disturbed the sparrows, who fled his hungry eyes with shrill chirps. The whole forest was alive with activity and bathed in glorious golden light.

I was happy to get out with my camera again to enjoy and capture this unique moment and, hopefully, bring some of that joy to others.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300 mm @ 95mm
1/4 sec @ f/25, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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