Tag Archives: delicate

“Delicate Blues”

“Delicate Blues”

“In this delicate and unpredictable life, the future is unwritten. Do not take someone for granted today, for once tomorrow dawns upon the indigo night the only remaining trace will be tracks in the sand…”
― Virginia Alison

I find myself once more, considering the delicate beauty of the Siberian Squill that grows in my gardens. Since I made the original image of the stunning blue blossoms a few days I keep going back to them with new appreciation.

A few days back, I photographed the flowers at the end of the day, when they had closed for the evening. The bright blue colour still dominated the frame and the fine structures of teh stem showed a bit more.

It’s interesting how we take simple things, like these small flowers for granted, without taking the time to see them closer and appreciate the things that can only be observed when proper time is spent with them. Very much like how we interact with people in this crazy, busy world. Like the flowers, their time with us may be brief. When they are gone, all that remains are memories, many of which, if we consider them carefully are not fully representative of the full person. Something for me to consider.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
0.5 sec, f/32.0 ISO 400

High Resolution image on 500px

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“Grape Hyacinth Revisited”

“Grape Hyacith”

“Because you don’t notice the light without a bit of shadow. Everything has both dark and light. You have to play with it till you get it exactly right.”
― Libba Bray

A few days ago, I posted an image of grape hyacinth with a white background, something a bit new to me, since I really enjoy the dramatic look of the black background. At the time, I also offered to publish the same image with the black background to compare. Keep in mind, nothing else changed except the background and a slight edit to remove the flower pot, which I found distracting on this version. It’s pretty astounding the different effect a background can have.

For reference, here’s the link to the original post. “Grape Hyacinth”

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1.6 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

High Resolution Image on 500px

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“Grape Hyacinth”

“Grape Hyacinth”

“There are just two directions in life, the one which is safe but boring, and the other which is delicate but exciting. Now ask yourself, which path will you go?”
― Joe Mari Fadrigalan

I’m toying with the white background this week but not sure how much I like it. It’s a bit of a creative risk, as I have been enjoying the black background photographs I’ve been doing  so much. I also don’t have a good white backdrop, so relying on a roll of drafting paper I have anding and fighting with the background texture.

The lighting and everything else seems to work, but I’d appreciate any feedback.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1.6 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Pink Gladiolus”

“Pink Gladiolus”

“There are just two directions in life, the one which is safe but boring, and the other which is delicate but exciting. Now ask yourself, which path will you go?”
― Joe Mari Fadrigalan

Though not a wonderful specimen, there is still beauty here. I’ve actually spend the past week or so photographing flowers that were ‘recycled’ and a bit wilted. Yet, I still see beauty and those blossoms, for the most part have been in great shape.

I have been following several photographers on 500px who seem to use the same the same general style. They tend to be pretty private on the ‘hows’ of their technique. As I follow, I am amazed at the variety of blossoms they capture. Some admit to making their photos at various botanical gardens. I will continue to pursue this as an option.

For autumn, I want to change it up a bit and start capturing the beautifully coloured leaves in this same style. I’ve done a couple of experiments and will be posting them in the next few days. As always, I appreciate your comments and feedback as I learn.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 110mm
1/6 sec, f/20.0, ISO 400

High Resolution image on 500px:

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“Queen Anne’s Lace”

“Queen Anne’s Lace”“…lace is formed from the absence of substance; it is imagined in the spaces between the threads. Lace is a thing like hope. It lived, it survived, and it was desired for what it was not. If faith, as the nuns said, was the substance of things hoped for, then lace was the outline – the suggestion – of things not seen.”
― Iris Anthony

How appropriate is the name of this common wildflower, with it’s beautiful. complex flowers. You’d expect to see them pressed flat as doilies, under fine teacups.

I’ve observed them and photographed them on many occasions, but it was not till I used this black background technique that I noticed the complexity of the small flowerettes that make up the larger bloom that we see. As with many of my recent photos, I’ll never see them the same way again.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/4 sec, f/25.0, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

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“Puff” – Wild Lettuce Seed Head

“Puff” - Wild Lettuce Seed Head

“In this delicate and unpredictable life, the future is unwritten. Do not take someone for granted today, for once tomorrow dawns upon the indigo night the only remaining trace will be tracks in the sand…”
― Virginia Alison

I’ve recently spend time capturing wildflowers and their domestic cousins in a series of photos with black backgrounds, including many which I’ve made using a portable background which allows me to make these photos in the wild. This technique, employed outdoors, can prove challenging, since it involves narrower aperture settings and longer exposures, without the use of a flash.

Indoor, studio work, is much more predictable and that is the route I chose for this delicate specimen. It would have been next to impossible to capture the fine details of the tufts without well controlled conditions. The seed head is the outcome of a blossom I had forgotten about, in a vase, which had gone to seed, leaving this wonderful puffy ball.

It’s a macro shot, so depth of field was a bit challenging, but a learning experience for me, nonetheless.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm (w manual tube extenders)
1/40 sec, f/2.8, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

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“Spring Beauties”

“Spring Beauties” - Close Up

“In a rich moonlit garden, flowers open beneath the eyes of entire nations terrified to acknowledge the simplicity of the beauty of peace.”
― Aberjhani

Can you think of a more appropriate name for these delicate spring flowers, in tones of pink and purple? The Spring Beauty (Claytonia virginica) in my area seems to prefer the bases of Beech trees as their habitat, yet some small patches grow in the open. Most of the plants I came across ranged between nearly white to pale pink and patched with striped fuchsia. This particular specimen was light blue with purple tinges in the flower buds, thus the photo.

I enjoyed the slight ‘glow’ of the stems, as the filtered afternoon sun lit up the forest floor. The light this day was spectacular and really showed the colours and textures well. Apart for their unique colours, this small colony sat apart for others and allowed me to isolate them for other plants, which are becoming more abundant as temperatures rise in the forest.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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