Tag Archives: details

Iceland Journal – “Hraunfosser”

“Hraunfossar”- Western Iceland

“Look with open eyes and you will see the beauty of the waterfall.” 
― Anthony T. Hincks

In this post, I decided to return to Hraunfossar, as fascinating series of waterfalls in Western Iceland.

What makes these falls so amazing, is that at first glance, they look like typical waterfalls, pouring down from some glacial stream. But, on further inspection, you realize that there is no stream involved here, at least not in the typical sense.

You see, Hraunerfosser, or Lava Falls, in Icelandic, comes from underground rivers, flowing through the Hallmundarhraun lava tunnels from a significant distance. The glaciers which feed these waterfalls are many kilometers away, but can been seen on the distant horizon.

I particularly enjoyed this location, since it’s just far away from Reykjavik to decrease the number of tourists, thought there was a single bus here when we arrived, but the crowds were quite spread out. This allowed me the time to really enjoy this natural beauty without contending with the accursed selfie-sticks and people posing precariously on the rocks to get that perfect Instagram worthy shot.

The location does have some very well laid out and spacious viewing areas. Again, minimizing the tenancy for people to climb barriers for a ‘personalized’ view. It also provided some nice places to set up my tripod to make a series of long exposure images and to visually explore this beautiful place without people bumping into me or walking in front of my camera.

By “exploring visually”, I mean being able to take the time to really appreciate the fine details that make this waterfall so lovely. For example, the fine ribbons, jsu left of centre on the shot above, yielded this detail, as the ribbons flowed gently over the rock surfaces:
“Liquid Ribbons” - Hraunfossar, Western Iceland

The detail of the water, the texture of the rock, and the vibrant colours of the wet mosses made for a beautiful photo, which for me, really captures the essence of this waterfall, or rather series of waterfalls, which just blend together into a complex and curtain of flowing water.

Of all the massive and humble falls I saw, I think I was most captivated by this one.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 92mm
1.0 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Crocus”

“Crocus”

“Nothing is less real than realism. Details are confusing. It is only by selection, by elimination, by emphasis, that we get at the real meaning of things.”
― Georgia O’Keeffe

I’ve been wanting to make this image for a few weeks now, but the crocus did not cooperate, till now.

Just as temperature began to climb, heavy rain and wind set in, followed by yet another cooling. So, many of the blooming plants in my garden got delayed, once more.

The crocus has put up two blossoms so far, and this is the first. I decided to do a front on view, as it shows the wonderful structures so well. I have to admit that I am very pleased with this one. Of note, it took an extended exposure to show the structures of this dark purple bloom. Being freshly back from a Georgia O’Keeffe exhibit at the Art Gallery of Ontario, her words echo through my mind, once more. My photography, of late, has been focused on pulling away, or elimination of, distracting details. I’m trying to show the true essence of the flowers, as I see them. It’s a worthy philosophy for living too, I think.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
3.0 sec, f/36.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Looking Inside”

“Looking Inside

“Most of the things that give life its depth, meaning, and value are impervious to science.”
― Rachel Naomi Remen

I know, this gets done a lot, but I could not resist giving it a try with a couple of my tulips, which are now past their prime. It does give a nice view on the structures inside the blossom and was fairly simple to light, which is really what I was after; trying to capture some of the soft reflection within the petals.

I also wanted to keep depth of field adjusted to show just the centre structures clearly and have the background fade slightly. This was a bit more challenging, given how close the lens was, and I did not want to use advanced techniques like focus stacking to get it all sharp.

Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1.6sec, f/40.0, ISO 200

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Floral Door Hardware” – Hotel California, Todos Santos

“Floral Door Hardware” -  Hotel Caifornia, Todos Santos

“When you take the time to look carefully, deliberately, to really ‘observe’, the fine details missed by our busy, ever filtering consciousness, expand our vision and engrave that memory more permanently.”
 – Ed Lehming

It’s the details, those little things our brains tend to file away as inconsequential within the broader experience, that fascinate and perplex me. Our eyes see it all, but very little is retained, unlike the camera, which keeps a permanent record of everything. But, as I said in my quote above, you have to take the time to look for those details and consciously remember them, or the details are purged, as we hurry to take everything in. Are we really taking everything in? Yes, but so much more is lost. That’s just how our brains are wired.

I find that to be the saddest thing in our busy world, at least in western cultures. We save up and vacation in the locales of our imagining. But, when we get there we, and I’m speaking generally here, tend to go to the places we have seen images of and drink in a larger experience than the photos or videos of others provide. That is quite fulfilling as we are now seeing ‘more’. Yet, how often do we stand in a place and really experience it? Taking in every fine detail?

My example above is a piece of hardware on a rustic door at Hotel California, in the Mexican village of Todos Santos. We had spent quite a bit of time touring this well-known tourist destination. But, it was not till I was standing outside the door, waiting for the rest of my family to finish their various activities, that I noticed this beautiful, handcrafted door hardware. In the shape of a coneflower, the petals are brass, stamped with yet more detail and the centre, is forged iron. In my opinion, a wonderful addition to the weathered wooden doors leading to the gift shop. Then there’s the wood itself, with it’s complex grain and subtle colour hues. Who saw the staple? No cheating.

Had I not been standing there, I might have noticed them, but not the details. I’ve had the same  experience when I take a hike with someone and find them surprised at the number of photos I have made of wildflowers and other items along the way that they missed, even though the believed they were taking it all in.

If you want to be an observer and savour and experience fully, you need to slow down, just like enjoying a good meal. Take it in, one small bite at a time and let the image fill your senses.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/80 sec, f/4.5, ISO 200

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“Simple Elegance”

“Simple Elegance”

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.”
― Clare Boothe Luce

Today, the roses in the bouquet opened up a bit more, including this beauty, which was tightly closed yesterday, now partially open and looking marvelous and nearly flawless.

I’ve spoken before about the wonderment that I experience when making these macro images and I ask myself why I have missed these wonderful details all these years. The fine structures of a simple rose petal is absolutely stunning. When you look closer, you can even see the ridge created by the overlying petal as the flower was still tightly closed, the warm translucency of the petals, as the overlap, and the soft glow along the petal edges.

Isolating the blossom against the black background forces the eye into that detail, with no background to distract the eye. The rose, is the singular focus, and as the eye drifts over the surface, more and more detail becomes noticeable. I know I will never look at flowers the same way.

My photography is beginning to change how I see the world, not that I have ever been overly casual about nature, but now I’d add ‘deliberate’ to that description. I’m forcing myself to slow down, observe carefully, and truly appreciate the intricate systems in play in our natural world.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
0.6sec, f/25.0, ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Poinsettia – A Closer Look”

“Poinsettia - A Closer Look”

“Our hearts grow tender with childhood memories and love of kindred, and we are better throughout the year for having, in spirit, become a child again at Christmas-time.”
― Laura Ingalls Wilder

I could not resist taking a closer look at this poinsettia. As a child I’d often look at them, marvelling at the bright red petals, that are actually leaves, rather bracts (modified leaves), as they transition to green further down the plant. Then there are the actual flowers, which are the bright yellow part in the centre. It seems that when the light hits them just right, they seem to be almost metallic.

So, to be able to photograph this view is a real joy for me. It allows me to really see the complex structures and wonderful texture in the leaves. All the details are here to look at and enjoy.

There is a really good chance this image might just be my 2016 Christmas card.

Nikon D800
Nikor 24-70mm f/3.5-4.6 @ @ 70 mm
1.3 sec, f/29.0, ISO 200

Hi Resolution image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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Thursday Doors – October 13, 2016

“University College Side Door”

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

Back to the University of Toronto and the wide assortment of doors and interesting architectural styles.

An observation, as I considered this image: it is incredible, the details, some quite obvious, that we miss. For example, this door has two very distinct and different columns, each with a unique capital (that is the top part of the column). Something I had not noticed when I first saw the door and framed the shot. It now has me curious what the symbolism of the two styles is.

A rather sad element of this image is that it shows the significant damage done to the marble columns by salt and age. However, the door itself is quite marvelous with its expressive ironwork. I hope you enjoy this week’s Thursday Door.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 80 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com