Tag Archives: Ed Lehming

“A New Day Dawns” – Fraser Lake

“A New Day Dawns” - Fraser Lake

“Veil after veil of thin dusky gauze is lifted, and by degrees the forms and colours of things are restored to them, and we watch the dawn remaking the world in its antique pattern.”
― Oscar Wilde

This is the same view I posted yesterday but fourteen hours later. I have now returned home from a four day escape to the wilds of northeastern Ontario. I spent the time walking the trails, sitting on moss covered boulders, enjoying sunrises and sunsets, and simply drinking in my surroundings.

It’s been a spectacular November, with temperatures in the mid teens (fifties for my American friends). Each day was bright and sunny with shifting breezes. Each day ended with a lovely sunset and this particular day dawned a mix of lazy pinks and blues amid a high cloud deck, which soon dissipated.

Needless to say, I will be posting more photos of my ‘retreat’ and some thoughts about teh thing I experienced during this time.

iPhone 5s back camera @ 4.2mm
1/60 sec;   f/2.2;   ISO 32

High Resolution image available on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Ablaze with Life” – Two Views

%22ablaze-with-life%22-steady“Ablaze with Life”

“But it is a pipe.”
“No, it’s not,” I said. “It’s a drawing of a pipe. Get it? All representations of a thing are inherently abstract. It’s very clever.”
― John Green

I’ve had a few people comment on the forest abstracts that I create and how I do it. That is something that I have learned through experimentation and though I share my camera settings, the precise method is difficult to describe. I’m afraid if I over thought it, the images may not look the same. It’s really a ‘feel’ thing, the ‘art’ part for me. None of this workis done in Lightroom or Photoshop. It would simply not be satisfying for me.

One thing I did want to share is a before and after view of the same scene. First, I look for bright colours and a strong dark to light contrast, which was the case of this forest edge scene with the dark tree trunks and bright leaves (yellow maple and red oak). If you look carefully at the two images, you will see that the abstract captures most of the details and actually enhances the colours by blurring them together, leaving less dark shadows.

I tend to stick to a 1/4 sec shutter speed, since that has worked best for me. Next ,I do a vertical pan when activating the shutter. I often make multiple images and adjust aperture for exposure. The rest is really just previewing the images and deciding if what I have captured is what I envisioned. There have been instances when I have come across a composition I like and made 20 attempts to get it right with not a single suitable image. Thank goodness for digital cameras.

It’s a technique I learned from another photographer and customized to my own style. It’s also very satisfying, since I am creating something that did not exist before, in its modified form, yet still has natural origins.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Forest Floor Colours”

“Everything turns in circles and spirals with the cosmic heart until infinity. Everything has a vibration that spirals inward or outward — and everything turns together in the same direction at the same time. This vibration keeps going: it becomes born and expands or closes and destructs — only to repeat the cycle again in opposite current. Like a lotus, it opens or closes, dies and is born again. Such is also the story of the sun and moon, of me and you. Nothing truly dies. All energy simply transforms.”
― Suzy Kassem

Back at a computer after a week of travel, and time to add some context to my simplified posts of late.

The image above was taken on a whim. Autumn was just approaching and a few leaves had made an early descent to the forest floor, still littered with last years’ remnants and several green plants. The contrast between the dry gray leaves from last year, the newly fallen, and the still growing plants told the story of continuous cycle in the forest, made more noticeable to me by the bright colours, randomly scattered.

iPhone 5s back camera @ 4.2mm
1/30 sec;   f/2.2;   ISO 125

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Facing the Sun”

“Facing the Sun”

“Sunflowers, Not Facing the Sun” (A Poem)

I stand tall
As gracious as one could be
Blooming to my best
As slender as it touches my being
Everyone else is facing the sun
Bending towards its unfathomable galore
They and I are both undoubtedly
Grown on the benevolence of life’s essence
The brighter side mercilessly feeding desires unbound
By daunting the “courage to know” with each spin
Though, I am not able to face the sun the way they do
Yet, I learn from the knowledge bred within me
Beyond achievement markers, but an adverse ability
An opportunity to exercise my special self
From the cherubic attire of my blessed soul
To the unfathomable mystery the drape of this world hides
That I, by not facing the sun
Hunt the gems in the milieu of the human existence”
― Annie Ali

As the days shorten and cool, I find myself reflecting back on the wonderful summer of 2016. Many hot days, one the water, on the trails, or just sitting and relaxing, eyes closed and basking in the sun.

So, as I take in the last blossoms of summer, I’m particularly drawn to sunflowers, with their sun-like faces, petals blazing forth in warm yellows. Until recently I had not noticed all the variations of sunflowers, from the traditional seed-bearing varieties to the yellow or black faced ornamentals, all beautiful and all reminders, to me, of warmer days, as they matured, facing the sun and drinking in its energies, and reflecting it back now, as the sun itself is less present.

Nikon D800
Nikor 28-70mm f/3.5-4.6 @ 70mm
1.3 sec, f/22.0, ISO 400

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Red Berry Filler”

“Red Berry Filler”

“Autumn is the mellower season, and what we lose in flowers we more than gain in fruits.”
― Samuel Butler

I’m not really sure what kind of berry this is. They look a bit like cranberries, but I suspect that is not the case. They came as a colour ‘filler’ in a bouquet of flowers I purchased for our Thanksgiving table. Of course, I had to pull it apart and make photos of the various blossoms, some of which have already been shared here.

In any case, I thought they were interesting and liked the way the light played off the berries themselves. If anyone has an idea what they might be, I’d be happy to be informed.

Nikon D800
Nikor 28-70mm f/3.5-4.6 @ 70mm
1.3 sec, f/22.0, ISO 400

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Visions of Autumn – Orange Maple”

“Visions of Autumn - Orange Maple”

“And that afternoon, as the sun slanted low through the changing autumn leaves, I remembered to savor the moment, soak in the beauty, breathe deeply and feel the immensity of God.”
― Cindee Snider Re

The next component to nature’s fall palette around here is orange. Interestingly, when I got closer to this branch for a bright orange maple tree, I found a surprising amount of green and yellow, with patches of red and orange. The result, when viewed from a distance is a blazing orange.

This tree, in it’s entirety, can be seen in a post I made of few days ago (it’s the large tree near the back of the group).

I’m quite enjoying this study series and hoping the colours don’t fade before I can build a good collection of images. Bt with autumn, we can only hang on for so long and then it’s gone. I’m hoping for an extension like we had last year. Fingers crossed.

Nikon D800
Nikor 28-70mm f/3.5-4.6 @ 70mm
1 .3 sec, f/25.0, ISO 400

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“A Mix of Sun and Cloud” – Altona, Ontario

“A Mix of Sun and Cloud” - Altona, Ontario

“Just as a painter needs light in order to put the finishing touches to his picture, so I need an inner light, which I feel I never have enough of in the autumn.”
― Leo Tolstoy

I’ve titled myself a ‘photo opportunist’ a few times. Really, it’s all about being prepared for any eventuality. This means knowing my gear, settings, and my surroundings. A lot has to do with experience, most bad to mediocre. The many images that ‘could have been’, but did not turn out because I was not properly prepared and inexperienced.

This was not the case today. I went for a brief drive through the countryside near my house. It made for a nice lunch break and cleared my mind.

The forecast was for a mix of sun and cloud and that is exactly what we got. A newscaster this morning asked where the line is between this forecast and mostly sunny or mostly cloudy. That seemed to depend on the time of day, as the cloud cover was very variable, but looking distinctly like autumn, with heavy clouds passing by quickly overhead, a cool breeze and the threat of intermittent showers at any time.

The trick, if you will, to photographing in these conditions is simply patience and choosing a subject and location. As I drove down the country lane, I noticed this cluster of maple trees lit up by a narrow sliver of sun, with the contrasting dark sky as a backdrop. Determined to capture this, I got closer, framed my shot and sat, waiting for another break in the cloud. I was not disappointed. Within minutes, the sun broke through the clouds, setting the trees ablaze with light, while leaving the foreground in shadow. The effect is stunning and I was able to accurately capture one of those great autumn moments to share here.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom
@ 122 mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com