Tag Archives: emergence

“Blue Cohosh” – Stouffville Reservoir Trail

Blue Cohosh” - Stouffville Reservoir Trail

“Nobody sees a flower – really – it is so small it takes time – we haven’t time – and to see takes time, like to have a friend takes time.”
― Georgia O’Keeffe

Yet another, early emerger, Blue Cohosh. This beauty emerges from the forest floor looking more purple-blue than  this image indicates. However, I wanted to capture the delicate flower and blue fruit. When they first sprout from the ground, the leaves are tightly bound in a frilly bunch and then open up into tender leaves. I’m always surprised to see these spring flowers survive late frosts unscathed, yet they do. Among the brightness of other wildflowers, Blue Cohosh is lost, until you look for it and suddenly, it’s everywhere. I’m blessed to have an eye for these understated beauties, which others pass by, never knowing what has been missed.

This particular specimen provided a unique composition as the plant appears to rise from a bed of bright green balsams, and an assortment of twigs, the young, slightly out of focus maple in teh background just adds teh finishing touches to this forest floor scene.

Honestly, I could spend hours drinking this in, watching new life fill the forest floor in a carpet of luxurious greens, with flecks for pink, red, yellow, and white as teh fresh wildflowers show their faces to a waiting world for the first time.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 165 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Ramping up to Spring” – Wild Leeks at Stouffville Reservoir

“Ramping up to Spring” - Wild Leeks at Stouffville Reservoir

“When the time has come, every leaf turns to face the sun!”
― Akilnathan Logeswaran

“Ramps” or wild leeks (Allium tricoccum) are native North American plant and among the first plants to appear in moist woods, once the frost comes out of the ground. Because of the mild start we had to March, I thought I’d go out to see if anything had started to push through the ground yet. To my surprise, much of the ground remained firm, with a thin layer of frost still holding on in the shade of the forest.

Despite the frost, I did spot a few leeks pushing past the layer of last year’s leaves, yet other areas will likely be a few weeks behind as the sun slowly warms the ground. I also saw some traces of Spring Beauties leafing out at the bases of beech trees, which they seem to favour.

In a few more weeks the forest floor will be vibrant with bright greens, pinks, reds, whites and yellows as the wildflowers follow their annual pattern of emergence. And then, at the right time, I will return to this place, surrounded by warmth and colour, to carefully harvest a few handfuls of the delicious leeks to make a pot of potato-leek soup and formally welcome spring and its bounty.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/160 sec, f/7.1, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Red Maple Spring” – Stouffville, Ontario

“Red Maple Spring” - Stouffville, Ontario

As spring continues, more colour and new life emerges, following the cycle of death and re-birth. The delicate structures of new leaves exploding from once tight buds are part of that cycle. A few short days ago, these red maple leaves were just bumps on a branch. Now, you can see the future shape in miniature. The soft morning light created a nice back-lit effect that shows all the structures nicely and soft focus blurs another cluster of leaves in the background. There is something soothing about these photos. I think it’s the freshness and promise each sign of new life holds.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300 mm @ 165 mm
1/125 sec @ f/5.6, ISO 250