Tag Archives: erosion

Iceland Journal – “Steps to the Sky” – Djúpavogshreppur, East Iceland

“Steps to the Sky” - Djúpavogshreppur, East Iceland

“Well, first of all,” said the BFG, “human beans is not really believing in giants, is they? Human beans is not thinking we exist.” 
― Roald Dahl

You’d think, to look on this, that giants did exist, and had built a broad staircase to the heavens.

It’s quite a sight when you first see it, the broad and high steps of the steep hills along the East Fjords. For me, it was something I had not seen before. And, as most of my experiences, travelling through Iceland this fall, completely unexpected. They had the appearance of being somewhat unnatural, as if the mountains had been carved into these terraces.

I’m still curious as to the exact process that creates this effect. Yes, they have clearly been eroded over time to this form, but I don’t fully understand the geological process that causes this. It’s quite prevalent in Iceland, but I have, as yet, to find an article that explains it.

In any case, it makes the landscape quite stunning by creating layers upon layers of colour and texture, further enhanced, at higher altitudes by a light snowfall, as the layers continue into the sharp horn of Nóntindur, high above the Berufjörður fjord below it.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 75 mm
1/320 sec, f/10.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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Tuesdays of Texture – Week 13, 2017

“Eroded”“Eroded”

“In a decaying society, art, if it is truthful, must also reflect decay. And unless it wants to break faith with its social function, art must show the world as changeable. And help to change it.”
― Ernst Fischer

Here is my entry for Del Monte Y Mar’s Tuesdays of Texture Challenge Week 13 of 2017.

As I walked the streets of Todos Santos, Mexico a few brief weeks ago, enjoying the architecture, which is so different from home, I spotted this wall along one of the main streets.

It interested me immediately and I took the time to really look at it, to appreciate the textures and colours and create a mental story of the image. The exact location is a memory, but I could probably find it again.

What stood out at first, and what initially got my attention, was the deep reddish colour and grain of the exposed brick against, what at first, appeared to be a bright white wall. It was not till I looked closer that all the sub layers revealed themselves.

There’s the first layer of mortar, which holds the brick together and serves as an initial coating, then another layer of plaster, to smooth it out. That layer seems to have been painted a bright blue, and a subsequent layer of red, since weathered and coated with another layer of creamy adobe.

The crack exposes all these layers in a complex composition of colour and texture that just seems to work. Some may walk by and think it an eyesore, complaining that the building owner should repair it. But, there’s not much rain in this region and it will probably not be attended to for years to come. For some of us, a simple thing like a crack in a wall can become a world of its own, beauty in the mundane, and I’m happy to see it that way.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Wear and Tear”

“Wear and Tear”

“We are often unaware of the gradual decline and the erosion in our lives but not unaware of the gnawing feeling it brings.”
― Eric Samuel Timm

As I stood on the shore, I could not help but notice the features of this rock outcropping. Wave after wave flowed over it and the light revealed deep scrapes and abrasions. Small rocks washed and danced over the surface and around the edges. The surf repeated this pattern, over and over. At some point, driven by the extreme tides of the Bay of Fundy, larger boulders must have passed over the surface, creating the deep gouges and chips. Long before I was born and long after I’m gone, this pattern continues, adding to the abrasive material that’s responsible. Eventually, the rock will be worn down by some it’s own material.

How often does life wear us down to the point where we are the very agents of our continued erosion?

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 95 mm
1/8 sec, f/25.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com