Tag Archives: flight

“Ebony Jewelwing”

“Ebony Jewelwing”

A small black gem,
floating on gossamer wings.
Flitting and fluttering,
till the summer’s end.
– Ed Lehming

A member of the damselfly family, this ebony jewelwing floated from branch to branch around me for several minutes before finally settling on a leaf.

It required a slow and cautious approach to get within shooting range and I only managed a few shots before it took to the sky once more.

I really enjoy the way jewelwings float and flit, unlike dragonflies and their deliberate and rapid flight. The wings seem to be so pliable and ineffective but the random flight protects them from predators.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/100 sec, f/5.0 ISO 200

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Chickadee in Flight”

“Chickadee in Flight”

“Let your boys test their wings. They may not be eagles, but that doesn’t mean they shouldn’t soar free.”
― C.J. Milbrandt

This image was a surprising treat for me. I had been photographing a chickadee perching on some cattails along a local pond. As with many small birds, they tend to be a bit skittish and fast moving. This one seemed to be quite content but suddenly took to flight. I hit the shutter a split second after it took off. Thinking I had missed it, I proceeded to make a few other photos before going home.

When I got home and reviewed my images, this one startled me. Where I was expecting a frame filled with out of focus cattails, I found this wonderful image of the chickadee in flight and looking quite determined. The slight motion blur enhances the experience for me, accenting the motion of the quickly beating wings.

I probably could not have planned for this any better, especially considering that I had only my macro lense with me. My one saving grace was that I had set my shutter speed high to freeze the twitchy movement of the chickadee feeding in the first place. Sometime things just work out.

Also, shooting with my D800 made it possible to crop the original (see below), significantly, to get his composition."Chickadee in Flight" original

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/1600 sec, f/2.8, ISO 100

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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Tuesdays of Texture – Week 12, 2017

“Aerial Ridge”

“Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.”
― Leonardo da Vinci

Here is my entry for Del Monte Y Mar’s Tuesdays of Texture Challenge Week 12 of 2017.

I  usually chose a window seat when flying. I have a fascination for geography and love watching the countryside far below me. On occasion, a really nice geological feature presents itself, like this ridge of low mountains, somewhere over New Mexico, if my estimations are right. I’d love to be able to have GPS going while flying.

In any case, this large scale texture presented itself to me and I was able to make a decent photograph from the plane window, a challenge in itself. Those who have attempted it themselves will know what I mean.

iPhone 5s back camera @ 4.2mm
1/3400 sec;   f/2.2;   ISO 32

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“Poised for Flight”

“Poised for Flight”

The two hardest tests on the spiritual road are the patience to wait for the right moment and the courage not to be disappointed with what we encounter.”
― Paulo Coelho

I’m clearly missing the colours and warmth of summer as I sit here watching winter slowly grip the land. This photo was made in mid-September while I was out looking for wildflowers to photograph. But, being  ever the photo-opportunist I decided that this lone monarch butterfly was a good subject as well, as it gently and randomly floated around me, eventually landing just off the trail.

Those who photograph butterflies on a regular basis, you know who you are, can relate to the  time and patience required to get a good shot. In their natural environment,these skittish little beings simply to not sit still, nor do they land in close proximity to the photographer. They flit and float around on the breeze with no predictable pattern or destination, often not even landing. So we need to ‘sneak’ up on them, trying carefully not to disturb them, lest they take to flight again.

That’s why this photograph is so representative of the butterfly ‘quest’. They seem to be always ‘Poised for Flight’. Just as you compose the shot and all is perfect, off they go again. When all the elements fall in place, the wind is calm, and nothing disturbs them, a good shot is finally achieved.

Next time you look at a beautiful butterfly image, realize that a lot of effort probably went into creating the shot and it’s probably the only one in many that was satisfactory.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/160sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

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“As the Crow Flies”

“As the Crow Flies"

“I dream of flight, not to be as the angels are, but to rise above the smallness of it all. The smallnesss that I am. Against the daily death the iconography of wings.”
― Jeanette Winterson

Though a bit more of a brooding photo than I generally post, there was something about the form of the crow as he took off from the nearby cedars. The image, though not crisp and clean shows the slight movement of the wings in the air, yet the fine details of the beak still show.

I stood watching several crows that day, as the cawed and frolicked above me. It seemed like they were playing. I don’t know enough about crows to know if this was typical behaviour but it certainly caught my attention. The light that day was also dull, making it difficult to get a clean image, yet there is something her that I like.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0, ISO 200

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“Hawk!”

“If you are made for flight, intended for it,
you had better find a pursuer, fast.
Otherwise, all that fleeing is going nowhere.”
― Dan Chiasson

As I stood by the roadside, a large flock of birds suddenly lept to the air, spinning and weaving above the cornfield from which they had erupted. They flowed in the air like an apparition, then just as quickly, they descended and disappeared once more. All was still.

Then, within minutes, the pattern repeated, only this time, from the corner of my eye, i spotted the source of their flight, A Red-Tailed Hawk soared high above looking for some unwary prey. As soon as the hawk dropped behind the treeline, the birds settled back down till it’s next visit.

At the time, I did not know what variety of bird this was and assumed they were starlings, since starlings tend to form these groups, the larger ones being spectacular murmurations which seem to be some singular, living thing. As I looked closely at the photo, I noticed that these were in fact red-winged blackbirds. It’s the first time I’ve seen so many together. I suppose they are on their migration to warmer climes.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom
@ 140 mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3 ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com