Tag Archives: floor

“Forest Floor Companions”

“Forest Floor Companions”

“I am learning my way toward something that will make sense of my life, and I learn by going where I have to go, with whatever companions I am graced.” 
― Dean Koontz

At the base of a dead beech tree, these companions add brightness and life, among the dead and decomposing elements surrounding them.

For some unknown reason, the large beech trees in this local forest all died a few years ago. Many of them are very large and old, so it may just be a cycle, as there are many younger trees thriving in the same area. The die-off started a few years back and most of the elders are gone now, the bark peeling off their massive trunks,  branches falling to the ground with every passing winter. I also suspect a new housing development nearby may have altered the water table, ever so slightly, as to affect the older trees. The forest seems a bit ‘wetter’ than usual.

Yet, among all this death, spring offers her bounty of fresh life, in the form of wildflowers, growing in abundance at the base of these dead trees. There are Spring Beauties (Claytonia virginica), also known by some as May Flowers or Fairy Spuds (the roots and flowers are edible), with their bright pink faces and delicate stems. Then there are also Trout Lilies with their mottled leaves and bright yellow flowers. Mixed in among them, though not pictured here are red and white trilliums, to name the most predominant in my area. It seems every year there are more, which is wonderful to see.

To think a few short years ago I would walk these same trails and never notice anything but the white trilliums. There is something to be said for slowing down and just looking. It’s amazing what we can see, if we take the time.

Nikon D800
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Forest Floor Melt”

“Forest Floor Melt”

“Life is only a flicker of melted ice.” ― Dejan Stojanovic

Along the trails lie small depressions, filled with water, and lined in ice. The ground beneath still frozen as the sun gently warms the ground, freeing the scene from winter’s hold.

This scene, though it repeats every year, was particularly interesting, since it was such a mild winter and the only significant snowfall happened only a week ago. The result was very clean ice and snow, without significant dust and dirt contamination, making the ice quite white, rather than the usual gray. The trails, despite this late snowfall, were surprisingly icy, making my hike a bit treacherous, as I’m carrying my camera gear with me and really don’t want to fall.

The forecast, here in southern Ontario is for a warmer than usual spring, and I for one, am looking forward to that and continuing to get out there and document my experinces.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 190 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Forest Floor Eruption” – Stouffville Reservoir

cropped-e2809cforest-floor-eruptione2809d-stouffville-reservoir1.jpg

A slightly different view of the forest for you to ponder.

I spend a lot of time in the forest hiking and making photographs. People ask me where I find the wildflowers that I photograph. My response is, “Along the way”. I see them, because I know what to look for, where to look, and when to look, since I have experienced them in previous walks. Many of the flowers only bloom for a short period. So, if you miss them, your chance that year is gone.

A few years ago I went for a walk with a friend who wanted to show me the creek where the trout run. As we walked to the site, which he was very familiar with and had visited many times, I stopped and made several photos. He really had no idea why I kept stopping, until he saw the photos from the walk. He had no idea he had walked past so many beautiful sights. That’s the day I realized that the trick, if that’s what you call it, is to slow down and immerse yourself in your surroundings, to start really ‘seeing’ the finer details. I’ve found that once my eye picks up on a particular flower or plant that I have not seen before, I suddenly see them everywhere. It’s not like they were not there before, I’ve simply tuned in at a different level.

Many experiences in life also seem to be like that. Things go unnoticed until you encounter them once, then you see them easier and know them for what they are. As above, you become an experienced observer.

The photo above contains all the wildflowers I have recently photographed. Can you spot them?

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 70 mm
1/125 sec @ f/5.6, ISO 250