Tag Archives: Fraser Lake Camp

“Big Dipper over Fraser Lake”

Big Dipper over Fraser Lake 2013

“Constellations shine with light that was emitted aeons ago, and I wait for something to come to me, words that a poet might use to illuminate life’s mysteries. But there is nothing.”
― Nicholas Sparks

My first foray into astrophotography. Wow! There’s a heady handle!

I’ve seen so many spectacular images of the Milky Way and constellations that I was determined to try my hand at this. So, with tripod in hand, and some sage advice from the internet, I set out to capture an icon of the north, the Big Dipper, Ursa Major.

My first impression was “Man, it’s dark!”, I have to find my way down to the waterfront in the dark, try to retain as much of my night vision as possible, set up my camera without falling in the drink, and hope for the best, based on a few dubious night photography articles, not knowing what my camera was capable of.

In a nutshell, star shots require a fast lens, like my Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8, fully open to let as much light in as possible, a steady tripod, and a long exposure of no more than 30 seconds, because anything longer will show visible star trails. Yes, the earth turns quickly enough to show that movement in a long exposure photo. Still sticking to my maximum 200 ISO discipline, as side benefit of which is reduced noise.

Well, here goes. All set up, according to untested instructions. Frame composition, without being able to really see it…set aperture…focus…click…..wait, for longer than expected…don’t move…hope….click…look…hey, not bad! An image, vaguely resembling my intent appears as a preview on my teeny,tiny, screen. Make a few more images, just in case. Mission accomplished. More waiting. Overall , a process of hope and anticipation of what might be.

Now, back to the computer, download images, adjust in Camera Raw…smile! Images turned out, success on the first try! The Big Dipper reveals itself from the background, exactly as expected (and hoped for with crossed fingers). Unexpected surprises: there is still residual light from a sunset long since passed, lights from cottages across the lake shine brightly, and the Big Dipper dominates the frame, exactly as hoped for. Deep sigh of relief, this stuff actually works!

I’m so happy to have been able to capture this scene, which is not only familiar, but such a big part of my outdoors experience in a place which I love. It’s the first recognizable constellation to reveal itself and show itself in such a wonderful way, hovering over Fraser Lake, floating over the remains of the day. I am at peace.

Nikon D300
Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 @ 17mm
30 sec, F/2.8, ISo 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Advertisements

“Afternoon Forest” – Fraser Lake Camp

“Afternoon Forest” - Fraser Lake Camp

“I will not be just a tourist in the world of images, just watching images passing by which I cannot live in, make love to, possess as permanent sources of joy and ecstasy” – Anais Nin

It is a joy to experience, at the deeper level, some of the scenes I come across in my journey through life. Places my feet have travelled many times, at once become magical with the addition of the elements of light. It’s that particular moment when the sun shines between the trees in a winter afternoon can makes a simple forest into a wonderland of light and texture, and then, it’s gone, never to look quite the same again, except in that brief moment, as an image captured and remembered.

Above is an image of the forest along the shores of Fraser Lake, near Bancroft, Ontario. I’d spent most of the day snowshoeing  through the forest trails and along the frozen lakeshores. Overnight, a wet snow had fallen and stuck to trees and grasses. A rapid daytime cooling preserved the effect well into the day. I was fortunate to be returning to camp by way of the Lone Pine trail when the scene presented itself to me.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 120mm
1/120 sec, f/2.8, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Winter’s Dance”

"Winter's Dance"

A switch today from my mono posts of late and a look back to a winter past, in abstract. The above is a view through the edge of the forest at Fraser lake Camp, near Bancroft. There was a bit of fog in the air and frost on the branches. The whole scene had a dreamy feel to it. Since the vertical elements were present, I decided to try a vertical pan to add more of a surreal feel to the image. When looked at the final product, I had the sense that the trees were dancing, as they seemed suspended above the ground, as the branches wove and blended together. The thin horizon helps to anchor the whole scene.

Nikon D300
Nikor 28-70 mm  f/3.5-4.5 @35 mm
1/2 sec, f/25.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com

“November Fraser Shores” – Fraser Lake, Ontario

"November Fraser Shores"

A look back to last month, when I spent a few rain soaked days in the Fraser Lake area. This photo, made from the boat launch at the north end of the lake, encompasses a lot of what those days were like. It was still quite mild for mid-November, but a slow moving low pressure system had set up and filled three solid days with off and on rain, mist, and variable winds.

The mist created the nice layered effect of the trees on the far shore, while mid-frame, a few late migrating ducks take a rest just off shore.

For friends of mine who know the lake, you can see the Fraser Lake Camp ‘barge’ resting on the dock as well as the connecting bridge that spans the dual swimming docks.

For me, the image portrays the ‘resting’ time between a busy active summer on the lake and the inevitable winter to come. It’s a bit melancholy and that is the reason I chose to produce the image as a black and white.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/30 sec, @ f/2.8 -0.33, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com

“Old Barn” at Fraser Lake Camp

“Old Barn” at Fraser Lake Camp

This photo was made last November at Fraser Lake Camp, near Fort Stewart, Ontario. It is a wonderful children’s camp, established some 60 years ago. The Old Barn is the only original building still standing on the property. It’s all log construction and sits at the edge of a field, surrounded by planted pine forest. I found this to be a wonderfully serene image, full of transitions. The lines of dark clouds are harbingers of the winter to come, yet grass still shows through. There is snw on the ground, but it would stay for long, as the meager sun warms the ground. There is also a shift from agriculture to native forest.

I have found several other buildings like this is the area, which was hoped to provide farming opportunity at one time, but the soil is just too shallow to support any sustainable farming. There are still a few operating farms, mostly livestock and hay.

It is interesting also to see gradual transition to native hardwoods, as can be seen to the left and right, with encroaching birch trees and poplars. The world is full of change, some rapid and some that can only be observed over years and decades.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300mm f/5.6 @ 70mm
1/160 sec @ f/8.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com