Tag Archives: garden

“My Shady Place”

“My Shady Place”

“It is in the shade that you look up at a tree and appreciate its efforts.” 
― Matshona Dhliwayo

The versatility and adaptability of nature is endless. Here, a small fern has found a place in the shade that allows it to grow, protected for the heat, and largely isolated from competing plants.

I often see theses mini gardens, some filled with ferns, others with small trees or mushrooms. It seems that all it takes is for a little soil to form and a seed to fall in the right place to create these private places of growth.

This one caught my attention along the trail as the sun was reflecting brightly from the fern’s leaves and the moss encrusted bark of the fallen tree in an otherwise shaded and green forest floor. As you can see, the moss is quite dry since we have had very little rain over the past few weeks and the forest is showing the stress of this weather. But, this little fern seems to be doing quite well init shelter.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/50 sec, f/3.5, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Garden Sunshine”

“Garden Sunshine”

“It was June, and the world smelled of roses. The sunshine was like powdered gold over the grassy hillside.” 
― Maud Hart Lovelace

I noticed, as I wrote this post, that I have not posted an image since May 31st. That’s what happens when you step away from something for too long; the time gets filled with other things.

The discipline of posting every day has been a very fulfilling experience for me. It forced me to be inspired when I was not and has taken me into the world of writing, which is not something I believe I am very good at. Posting and writing daily has caused me to consider my photos on a much deeper level. Writing about them has allowed me to go back to photos and the words that wrote and reflect back on that time and place. It has become a journal of my journey into me deliberate photography and has expanded my ability to explain much of the ‘why’ behind the photograph as well as the ‘how’.

So, today, as the rain finally falls outside, bringing much-needed moisture, summer is upon as, and so too, are roses.

As those who follow my blog will realize, I have a love for gardening and most plants do very well in my gardens. The one plant I have not been really interested in  is the rose. I love the look and fragrance of them, but have not felt a desire to grow the. My father was an avid and successful rose gardener, but for some reason, I never picked up on his particular passion. Perhaps that will be my challenge for next season.

The rose pictured above is actually named Garden Sunshine by the Richmond Hill Horticultural Society and is described by the hybridizer as ” “brilliant yellow, like sunshine in a plant,”. That is an apt description for this beautiful rose. What the description leaves out is the magnificent fragrance. I’m actually looking forward to having them in may garden.

The blossoms I photographed were given to my wife by a family friend who has several of these roses in his garden.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
3.0 sec, f/29.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Honeybee and Oregano Blossoms”

“Honey Bee and Oregano Blossoms”

We have to know our place in the ecosystem of which we are a part, and this means living ‘consciously’: being aware of nature and how it affects us and how we, in turn, affect nature.” 
― Sebastian Pole

I am so pleased lately to see so many bees. For the past few years they have been scarce, especially honeybees. There are many pollinators out there, but honeybees have been exceptionally rare around here. It’s a frightening thought, to lose our bees, though I know many efforts have been made to preserve and increase the population. Thankfully, those efforts seem to be paying off.

When I went out today to check on my herb garden, it was with great pleasure that I noted the many honeybees flying from flower to flower. Purple, seems to be the draw this month.

Of the many images I made today, this one pleased me the most. The bee itself is in sharp focus yet even at 1/400 sof a second, the wings are still a blur, emphasizing the speed with which these bees move. It was, despite the bright light, tough to get a clear shot. But, here it is, a moment in the garden, the cycle of life, captured.

One of the pleasures of gardening is having these processes close by. The oregano plant itself is from last year’s planting, asi t winters over quite well. This garden also has basil, mint, and rosemary, but the oregano is the one with the bright, fragrant blossoms. Of course, bees were not the only participants, numerous flies, wasps, and beetles joined in the feast, but the honeybee stole the show for me.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/200 sec, f/16.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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Tuesdays of Texture | Week 30 of 2017

“Nodding in the Garden”

“If it comes, let it come. If it goes, it’s ok, let it go. Let things come and go. Don’t let anything disturb your peace. Stay calm and carry on.” 
― Germany Kent

“Nodding in the Garden”

Here is my entry for Del Monte Y Mar’s Tuesdays of Texture Challenge Week 30 of 2017

 I had no particular reason for making this image, other than it was peaceful. That’s often the way of it; I have no intention of making a particular image, it’s simply there, and it appeals to me. Often, I don’t even know why at the time, I just know I need to capture this moment. It’s not till I sit down to review the images of the day that I become aware of the ‘why’.
In the case of this image of purple hosta blossoms, the ‘why’ is still not revealing itself to me. So, I sit and enjoy it, for what it is, taking in the colours and textures, reveling in the memory of a soft, summer day.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/125 sec, f/16.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Texas Buttercup” – Oenethera triloba

“Texas Buttercup” - Oenethera triloba

“Waiting for you
is as delightful as
waiting for sunset.”
― Kamand Kojouri

Hey, will you look at that, a flower that is not pink for a change. The seasons are turning, and as my lovely peonies fade into memory, yellow has returned in full force.

This flower, which we mistakenly named ‘moon flower’ when we first got it from my mother-in-law, who also called it that, because it opens at dusk. It’s a fascinating plant to watch, though with foliage that very closely resembles dandelion, some do not survive till summer. I’ve pulled a few before realizing the error.

In any case, the flowers start as elongated pods with pointed ends. You can actually sit and watch them twitch before they open rapidly. Yes, they actually move from the energy of their opening. Then, in the blink of an eye, the pod bursts open at one seam and the delicate yellow petals unwind, yielding this wonderful, bright yellow blossom. The split pod can be seen below the flower in the image above. As the plant gets bigger, it may produce three to five blossoms in one night. The blossoms are short lived though, shrivelling up at dawns light, having been pollinated by moths and other night flying insects.

I have yet to watch one open this year. This one was already fully opened when I saw it.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
0.8 sec, f/36.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Bursting Forth”

“Bursting Forth”

“Everyday can be extraordinary
And ripe,
Like a flower burst,
If the will is there.”
― Scott Hastie

As a follow up to yesterday’s post, I revisited the bud I photographed the day before, titled “Opening Soon“. Well. it did open and I’m still amazed at how all this pomp and frill can fit inside such a small bud.

The peony season is beginning to wind down and we had a torrential downpour yesterday, which did not help them much. Yet, some survived and keep providing us pleasure through their soft and intricate blossoms.

This was, however, my only peony image of the day, as it was bright and sunny today, so I ventured out to see how the wild orchids were fairing. More on that tomorrow.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/36.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Hanging On”

“Hanging On”

“Ants always eat sweet food … but none of them haven’t diabetes ?”
― Ali Ghasaby

Among the residents of peonies are, of course, ants. Ants of all sizes and shapes thrive on the sweet nectars the peonies offer from bud to blossom. It would be a rare occasion when I bring a peony blossom indoors that an ant does not emerge at some point. It’s a given.

As I photographed my post-rain peonies, I took the opportunity to try my hand at photographing the ant as it clung to the edge of a leaf. Since I was shooting handheld, I had to adjust my aperture up a bit, which meant I sacrificed depth to get an acceptable shutter speed. If I had to do this again, I would have bumped my ISO, and closed the aperture a bit more, but this is how I learn. There will be more ants.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/320 sec, f/5.0 ISO 100

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com