Tag Archives: granite

“Yellow Hawkweed Garden”

“Yellow Hawkweed Garden”

“Nature takes hold, in the smallest crack or hollow, filling them with life and laying the foundation for the next generation.”
– Ed Lehming

Among the solid stone of the Canadian Shield I find not only lichens but entire gardens of beautiful plants. Here, a crack in the granite is filled with a variety of Stonecrop known as Sedum Acre or Wall Pepper, with tall Yellow Hawkweed growing from it. The crack has produced its own little garden. And when this garden dies off in the autumn, it will produce even more compost, providing nutrients for a larger plant next year.

These little gardens were everywhere, some filling low spots but most popping out of cracks in the stone, as I stopped by Ontario’s Burleigh Falls to make some picture of the fast rushing water.

A side benefit to photography is that I often find new subjects to photograph while on my way to my intended destination. I was actually a bit disappointed in the images the waterfalls yielded, though I am still in the process of reviewing them. We’ll see if anything comes of them in future posts.

For now, I am content with what presented itself: some lovely plants and the great texture of the moss-covered rocks. What’s not showing in this image is the swarms of mosquitoes that greeted me on this rainy June day.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1/100 sec, f/8.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

 

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“Tenaya Creek Rush” – Yosemite National Park

Tenya Creek Rush

I love the movement of water. So, on my visit to Yosemite in 2013, I spent a good portion of my time hiking the shores of the many creeks and cascades throughout the park. Tenaya Creek, pictured above, parallels the Mirror Lake Loop trail and there are many opportunities, close to the trail, to view and photograph the creek as it churns down toward the main valley. What makes it even more beautiful, is the effect of the large granite boulders that litter the creekbed. The water churns over and around these boulders with such power and urgency. Close to my home the creeks are small, slow flowing meanders filled with small rounded rocks, with very little colour.

The mountain cascades, in contrast, are fast flowing, crystal clear and flow over pink and gray boulders. It’s much more active and colourful.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 70mm
1/2 sec, f/29, ISO 280

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com

“Beaverpond Treeline”

“Beaverpond Treeline” - near Kaladar, Ontario

As noted in a recent post, there is an area along Highway 7, in Eastern Ontario, with a very unique topography, made up of long bands of granite and close packed, narrow, and parallel valleys and ponds. Unlike regions like the Adirondacks, with its beautiful rolling mountains, this is like a miniature, compressed version. From the highway, the ridges don’t seem to be for than a few meters high and are populated with thin trees.

I imagine the reason for the thin trees is that they seem to be growing on a very shallow layer of soil. I don’t see very many large, mature trees, and I wonder if they were harvested aggressively at some recent point in history, or if this is a natural phenomenon.

The long, narrow valleys are also perfect for beavers to build their dams and make long chains of connected ponds, that follow the highway along, sometimes fading to a grassy meadow, before transforming into a pond again. The challenge to photographing this area from the road is that the highway winds along these ponds quite closely and there are very few places where you can pull over safely to make a photo.

The photo above was made at one of these few pull-outs but represents the scenery fairly well. I’d like to come back here some time and spend a few days hiking the ridges or canoeing the ponds to get a better sense of this strange place that is so unlike anything I have experienced before.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm
1/80 sec, f/4.5, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com

“Cold November at Burleigh Falls”

"Cold November at Burleigh Falls"

During my drive back from Bancroft this past Thursday, I commented to my wife that it looked like and felt like February, rather than April. Spring has been slow to arrive in southern Ontario this year and my thoughts wandered back to November, when I stopped at Burleigh Falls to make a few long exposure photos of the falls there.

At this particular time of year I basically have the place to myself. No tourists taking snapshots, no fishermen trying their best to land the big one, and no kids running madly around the rocks. Long exposure is an apt term for this. It was very cold and blustery and though I love this location, it was experiencing long exposure myself. However, the light was buried and beautiful and made it possible for the image above to be made. I particularly like the colours of the water in contrast with the pink granite in the background and the purplish sky. For me, it captures this moment beautifully, without the bone biting chill.

Nikon D300
Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 @ 38 mm
1/8 sec @ f/25, ISO 200