Tag Archives: HamletWhitevale

“Early May Bloodroot”

“Early May Bloodroot”

“The places of quiet are going away, the churches, the woods, the libraries. And it is only in silence we can hear the voice inside of us which gives us true peace.” 
― James Rozoff

There is peace in the forest, a peace that I dearly need in this busy world. In the forest, I can participate in the natural cycles, I can anticipate the next species of wildflower to bloom, or to come to leaf.

Bloodroots, have become a spring rite to me. Since I discovered them a few years ago, it’s been a regular visit to my favorite groves, close to home, to simply enjoy them as they emerge from their leafy cloaks.

There is such a purity to them and they seem so delicate and so fleeting and they are among the first early spring blossoms to appear.

The more I see them the more I am able to create more natural looking images, rather than the typical straight on shots. Many grow out in the open in small bunches, but I am really drawn to those clinging to the shadows of logs or hillsides. Here, they grow next to a fallen tree, among the tangle of vines. This composition feels more natural to me that those out in the open, as it includes elements of the forest they flourish in and I chose to preserve this particular memory of this spring’s cycle.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm

1/160 sec, f/16.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“The Final Stretch”

“The Final Stretch”

“Are you tired? Are you feeling that you will not be able to reach your destination? Then all you have to remember is that those who reached their far and hard destinations also felt the same way on their way! Knowing what others felt will give you a great power to complete your journey!” 
― Mehmet Murat ildan

I was looking for a suitable quote for this image and Mehmet always seems to have something that resonates with me.

The journey of the countless rainbow trout up Duffins Creek every April fascinates me. Since I saw salmon spawning in BC, these mass migrations have been a thing of wonder. The distance the fish travel, through almost insurmountable obstacles; strong currents, shallow water, and tangles of fallen tree limbs, to name only a few.

Yet, they persevere and most make it to the destination. In this case, a large dam that separtarates the introduced rainbow trout from the native brown trout. It’s at this dam that I witness the greatest ‘stretches’ as the trout leap high in the air, hoping to conquer the dam, to no avail. It’s their final stretch, literally, as they extend their brightly coloured bodies through the air. Once they figure they can’t go any further upstream, they spawn in a deep pool at the base of the dam, and make the return journey to Lake Ontario, this time, with the current to their favour.

In case you are wondering, I sat on a rock near the base of the dam for about an hour, waiting for just the right moment, and testing my reflexes, to make several images and settling on this one, which nicely shows the colour of the trout as the sunlight shines on its outstretched body. Also an act of perseverance.

If you like this image, I made another one similar to it, 3 years go, in the same location.

https://edlehming.wordpress.com/2015/04/17/rainbow-trout-jump-whitevale-dam-pickering-ontario/

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 200mm
1/2000 sec, f/5.0 ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Squirrel Corn”

“Squirrel Corn”

“The flower that wilted last year is gone. Petals once fallen are fallen forever. Flowers do not return in the spring, rather they are replaced. It is in this difference between returned and replaced that the price of renewal is paid.

And as it is for spring flowers, so it is for us.”
― Daniel Abraham

Several days ago, I posted an image of a plant known as “Dutchman’s Breeches” and mentioned that a similar plant also grew in the area. I recalled making an image of it and went in search of that image. Here it is. I’m also noticing, by going back a year, that my photographic technique and style has changed significantly.

I also noticed that it was a year ago when I purchased my Nikon D800 and I have become very comfortable with it. I’ve also updated lenses to be a bit more task specific. Last year I used my trusty 70-200 f/2.8 to make this shot, and now the rain has finally stopped, I’ll be heading back to retake this image with my 90mm macro.

The year over year comparison is interesting in several aspects: I can look back at how I photographed and what I photographed. I recognize that my knowledge of native plants and wildlife continue to grow, and I see the subtle seasonal differences in weather and growth patterns over the years. I thought last year was quite cool, but this year has proven much cooler and much wetter, with more than our monthly May rainfall coming down over the span of a few days, and now a brief cool down. I’m still waiting on trilliums which were plentiful this time last year.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 200 mm
1/80 sec, f/2.8 ISO 220

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Bloodroot Detail”

“Bloodroot Detail”

“A picture held us captive. And we could not get outside it, for it lay in our language and language seemed to repeat it to us inexorably.”
― Ludwig Wittgenstein

I was hoping to get a few more images before the bloodroot stopped blooming and was happy to see I had not missed my chance. I took my portable studio with me in hopes of being able to find a few specimens that lent themselves to this technique. A small grouping, just off the hiking trail presented just such an opportunity and I set about making a few images.

The image above appealed to me the most, as it shows the freshly emerged plant, with the flower about to open, a very similar scene to my earlier post. However, the black background does its job in really isolating teh plant and forcing us to observe the details. It’s still my favourite method of photographing plants and works fairly well outdoors, if teh light is not too intense and the air is calm.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/6 sec, f/22.0 ISO 100

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Trailside Periwinkle”

“Trailside Periwinkle”“It’s an odd thing, happiness. Some people take happiness from gold. Or black pearls. And some of us, far more fortunate, take their happiness from periwinkles.”
– Patricia A. McKillip

While hiking into the forest this past weekend, I came across a patch of periwinkle, still green even after the winter snows, though showing some wear. As I looked closer, I noticed a few blossoms had already opened. That’s a bit earlier than previous years. Though only a few blossoms where open, you can see plenty of buds waiting to open in the next few days.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/36.0 ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Start of the Spawn”

“Start of the Spawn”

“Give a man a fish, and you’ll feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he’ll buy a funny hat. Talk to a hungry man about fish, and you’re a consultant.”
― Scott Adams

With vegetation emerging and the ground warming, all the elements are aligned for the beginning of the annual Rainbow Trout on Duffins Creek. It has started, ever so slowly, the water a bit murky with spring runoff, but it has started.

There is a real pleasure for me to witness this large migration from Lake Ontario, many miles below, up Duffins Creek and the many obstacles along the way, to the waters above Whitevale, where they spawn and eventually return to the lake.

This one is the first real opportunity which presented itself. Though the lighting was not ideal, it’s still a nice representation of these beautiful fish. More to follow.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 200 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Bounty Awaits”

“Bounty Awaits”“When I see a dancing butterfly,
When I see a half blooming flower,
Their eager wish to make this world happy,
My mind dances with joy,
My soul emerges in happiness.”
― Debasish Mridha

The temperatures continue to warm, rain falls, off and on, and the cycle continues. New growth seems to accelerate. What was a mere bud a few days ago, now begins to show hints of its future form.

This flower cluster, which a photographed four days ago, has opened up even more. I’m still waiting to see the leaves a bit larger to assist in identifying what this flowering shrub is. I have to admit, looking at this process close up, through a macro lens, is very interesting. The forest was also quite a bit brighter this day and I was able to ease up a bit on the ISO settings. Here’s the previous image, if you missed my earlier post.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/80 sec, f/4.5, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com